The Biz Dojo

S2E20 - The Season Finale: Shooting Your Shot w/Ambrose Firkus and Parker Mackay

June 01, 2021 Ambrose Firkus & Parker Mackay Season 2 Episode 20
The Biz Dojo
S2E20 - The Season Finale: Shooting Your Shot w/Ambrose Firkus and Parker Mackay
Show Notes Transcript

This week in The Biz Dojo, we're joined by Ambrose Firkus and Parker Mackay from Shoot Your Shot.

We get into how these two have face challenges together as entrepreneurs, and how complimentary skillsets can lead to success on or off the ice. As strong advocates for mental health awareness, we also chat about the importance of well-being on performance, and how support systems play a pivotal role in finding success. 

Then on the podium,  brought to you by Beyond a Beaten Path, Seth and JP take part in National Say Something Nice Day - saying something nice about everyone who has made this season successful. From winning multiple awards to liking, commenting, subscribing and leaving reviews - we truly want to thank all of our listeners, guests, sponsors, friends, family and anyone who took a moment to in any way interact with the show.

So, sip on your delicious Biz Dojo Coffee (Masters Medium - OR - Dojo Dark) while you take in the final episode of season 2, and keep track of our summertime adventures and exciting events for The Biz Dojo by following our social feeds below!

Don't forget to visit us at the links below, and follow us on social media for exclusive content:
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Seth Anderson:

Welcome to The Biz Dojo, Seth and JP powered by dq grill and chill airdry season two, Episode 20. We're here, season finale, we're here, what a journey. What a journey.

JP Gaston:

So many twists and turns along the way to

Seth Anderson:

mostly good twists and turns. It's like

JP Gaston:

all good twists and turns. But surprising twists and turns along the way with, you know, the people we had on the show. And I think we were pretty confident after season one. And going into Season Two with Bill and having an award come our way, we were getting pretty confident that we were going to have a solid season and we would be comfortable with whoever came on. And then just, I feel like just guest after guests was just incredible.

Seth Anderson:

I wonder if we put out not too much. But I think it was hard for people to keep up at some point with all the content we were putting out, you know, week after week after week after week. But, you know, the good news is, is you can go back and listen. Yep. Anytime. Yeah, it's not live. I think one of the neat things to see has been, you know, one, some days, I'll just go in and have a look at the last couple days of downloads. And it's like somebody went in and listened to all of it, or half of it, or, you know, five or six episodes, which makes me feel like we're onto something in terms of you know, people picking up over putting down and feeling compelled when they do find it to go listen to multiple episodes.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, I see that right after an episode releases with a new person. And I love the diversity that we have within the the guests that have joined the show. And you can see that you know, it's a it's a new crowd, in some cases on a different part of the planet, finding The Biz Dojo and listening to an episode and thinking, hey, maybe I'll check out another one, and then another one, and then another one. And yeah, there's that that binge watch mentality that that kind of happens, which I love. I love seeing it in the stats.

Seth Anderson:

Oh, it's great. And it's great that our guests maybe get an opportunity to share their stories with another group or person that otherwise may have never heard from them. So I think that's the real special sauce.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, well, and to that point, we had a pretty a couple of pretty special guests. We wanted to end the season with a four person podcast because you wanted to make my life. It's hard. It's

Seth Anderson:

difficult than I usually do.

JP Gaston:

Yeah.

Seth Anderson:

Listen, we were gonna do this episode earlier in I think see vlog after we had that run and four person episodes and you were like, now I can't I just, I simply can't.

JP Gaston:

So many tracks to put together make sure they sound good.

Seth Anderson:

I think it worked out well, though. I'm really happy that we're finishing the season up with Ambrose and Parker. So for those of you who didn't catch the chopping it up episode back in, I can't remember agenda. It was a while ago, up until recently was our most viewed post ever, actually, which was pretty cool. We were happy to have the boys from shoot your shot back in the dojo. And really, that's the first time we've had a chance to catch up with someone in terms of, you know, they were just starting the business. They hadn't even ordered an article of clothing yet. And you know, now they're it's flying off the shelves? shelves, I guess I would say

JP Gaston:

the virtual shelves. Yeah, yeah, it was interesting to to touch back with them. Cuz we were when we first talked to them. We were kind of just on our on our start, right? We had just really finished the first season. But that was just us getting our legs under us and talking to them again, I think was was it was good for us. It was good for them. It was like all of our conversations. It's a great conversation. And we went down many paths, but really focused on health, right mental health and overcoming mental health challenges. And

Seth Anderson:

yeah, no, I thought that was a key thread throughout the conversation, just you know, what they've learned from the game of hockey, some of the best practices and leadership and things that they've taken with them into, we'll call it the normal world or the regular world and the nine to five world and, you know, it's just it's cool to see that they both have such a passion for giving back to the to the game they gave them so much. And, you know, recently since we did the interview, actually, Parker was named as assistant coach of the spruce Grove saints in the ajhl. So, you know, he's definitely got a passion for coaching. And, you know, that's largely the the premise or foundation that we built this show on was it was a passion for coaching and leadership. And obviously, he embodies that and Ambrose actually had an opportunity to work with many years ago in sort of that capacity and, and to see what he's done in terms of, you know, taking the reigns and coaching. Some of the under 18 teams, elite level hockey is really impressive as well.

JP Gaston:

So season two, Episode 20 final episode of the season, but definitely not the last thing that will, you know, come from us between now and season three. So I would say stay tuned for that. But maybe we can get into the episode now.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, let's do it. Here's the studies to get us there.

Voiceover:

Welcome to The Biz Dojo, your hosts. JP Gaston

Seth Anderson:

Welcome to The Biz Dojo with Seth and JP. This week for our season two finale.

JP Gaston:

Man that flew by JP I don't even know what day of the week it is right? That's like that was so fast.

Seth Anderson:

It feels like a million years ago that we interviewed bill. But anyway, very lucky season finale. We are joined again by our friends Parker MCI and Ambrose Fergus. Welcome back to the dojo fellas.

Parker Mackay:

Thanks for having us again. It's, it was awesome the first time around. So a lot of things have changed since then. But we're excited to share it. Yeah, no,

Seth Anderson:

we're happy to dive in. And we're gonna go a little bit longer. So for those of you who don't know, Parker, and Ambrose joined us on an episode of chopping it up, when was that like February, like 100 years ago? Yeah. It does seem like it was a while ago. I have no idea.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, no, it's been a while we'll link it will link it in there. And yeah, and on all of our all of our social cues, if you're listening to this podcast, hit up our social feed.

Seth Anderson:

Awesome. So today, boys, we're gonna we're gonna get into your journey a little bit, we want to hear a bit more about your background where you guys came from what inspired what you're doing right now. But I think just because we had you in before, how things are going these last couple of months, you guys are in the midst of a startup, an apparel, lifestyle clothing company, shoot your shot. I know, Parker, you've got some other things going on? How's it? How's it gone? these last couple of months? What are you guys learning? Let's, let's dive in there.

Unknown:

I think last time we talked, we were just more or less excited. I think it was kind of the starting point. Right now, I'd say we're still kind of at that beginning point where there's been a few curveballs thrown our way, just kind of through COVID, and just timelines and stuff that haven't been hit just on our side as well. So a lot of learning with that stuff and kind of pushing each other through. So

Seth Anderson:

a lot of a lot of learning, I guess to start with for sure. What's one thing that you totally underestimated about running a business that you've learned? For me

Unknown:

shipping costs? just realizing like, I knew that there'd be expenses, but the added expenses, you just you kind of never, you never realized how many different situations you have where you're throwing an extra, maybe one or $2 per item towards something else, whether it's the hat box, or like we like I just said shipping and stuff. So that's probably been the biggest learning curve for me is realizing that that type of stuff is a lot more difficult.

Seth Anderson:

And really manual, I would say we've learned that with our little coffee gig shipping cost more than the coffee and it's very time consuming to print labels and get boxes and all that stuff. Absolutely.

Wyatt:

Yeah, no, for me. I'm actually like, as far as just kind of surprises, I guess, or curveballs you'd call them like, that'd be very similar. Like a lot of the stuff that Parker has already mentioned. Shipping was a big one, like you're trying to try and get our product as far as we can and have people enjoy it. But I think a lot of the a lot of the surprise for people is when they get to the end of the website, and it's like holy, it's 13 or it's 15, or it's 18 or is 20 bucks, even just get the product and that's even us still losing money on it. So it's it's a challenge, though, we are trying to keep the consumer happy, as well as trying to run a business at the same time. So I think that's just been a big curveball curveball for myself anyways, and particularly exacerbated or made more difficult sort of being in a remote area.

Seth Anderson:

Have you guys looked at centralizing your operation into like a bigger center in any way or, you know, getting distribution out of like an Edmonton or Calgary or something like that?

Unknown:

Not necessarily at the moment. But it definitely is something to look into. I know that just talking to a couple people that have done other things. Travis bush out in Vancouver he said that it's it's a lot cheaper when he is taking it into Vancouver rather than the smaller areas that definitely do. It costs a lot more to ship from these smaller center. centers. Even Lloyd is tough. So yeah, for sure. Something to look into no question.

Seth Anderson:

So those have been the challenges. You guys have something that you didn't expect that's been really awesome or sort of a great part of the experience so far.

Unknown:

Yeah, I think kind of when we touch base The first time I think just being able to work alongside Park see and we've known each other for so long, but now getting to see just the business side and how his brain really works with all that stuff as well. Like it's been a learning curve for me and I've learned a ton just working alongside him already. So that part I've really enjoyed and I just just the sales part of being able to create something that we truly believe in and then kind of not push it on other people but allow them to see kind of our our vision with it as well and the sheer shot lifestyle. So just taking the as being able to live that life, I think partially and I do a good job of ourselves kind of being ambassadors of the brand. So I think that part's really cool for me to seeing guys even around town here and Lloyd guys in the fire department that are supporting it big time. And they're they're just as fired up as we are whenever something new comes out. And then vice versa. Same for sorry, not vice versa. But similar things in Irma like you go home for on a golf and you run into three people wearing hats or two people wearing sweaters. So the support so far has been incredible. I would say

Seth Anderson:

I feel like I predicted that, that everybody in Aruba would buy at least one thing. So

JP Gaston:

we did we did talk about that.

Seth Anderson:

Over your parks.

Unknown:

Yeah, it's been so fun working alongside my best friends. So that and again, seeing how his brain works, we feel like we mesh well together. He's got a lot of really, really good ideas. Sometimes I have to tone them down a little bit. Because he gets frickin likes to shut me down. Not in the sense of I mean, Rosie comes up with some incredible stuff but when he gets too fired up maybe about one thing or not, that's a bad thing like super passionate and I love that I feed off of his passion and everything that he does on the social media side. I've learned a ton from him. He's getting me out of my comfort zone as well. So I feel like just as a person in general I've grown a bunch just working with them and and yeah, we had a draft the other night like an NHL playoff draft and it was only six people but five of the people in it were rocking hoodies and just to see the support when even you're going shopping and waiting right to the Walmart. You see somebody rockin a hoodie that that you kind of know but you're not they're not just buying it because they know us they're buying it because they actually want the product so yeah, it's it's definitely rewarding. And it's fun to see. Honestly, I

Seth Anderson:

wear my shoot your shot hoodie or my The Biz Dojo ad every day. So everybody, my day job, see, so

JP Gaston:

every Caitlyn,

Seth Anderson:

and everyone in your video calls all day. Oh, I think to that point, you just made their parks JP and I the last few weeks, we've actually got to talk to quite a few different people who are involved in partnerships. And it sounds like you guys have the complementary skills. And I don't know JP if you have any thoughts on that, but I feel like that is one of the the keys to success. We've heard from everybody.

Unknown:

It's fun, because we are so tight. So we can run things off each other. And I instantly know if I have a good idea because I can see it if bros is equally as excited. And at the same time we're not afraid to get in each other's face either. And know that it's not personal or, or anything like that. Because in a partnership obviously things maybe you do not see eye to eye on every single decision. So it to be able to work with somebody that's comfortable enough to tell me that maybe I'm thinking my thought train or my thought pattern isn't exactly what he's thinking and vice versa. It's it's running really smoothly. So just even add on that I like we've had a few things or if I throw an idea parks, I got to trust them well enough that if he doesn't like it right away, I know, okay, like that's not something I'm going to push for and then vice versa, like Park see, we've had the conversation already. between ourselves just if you kind of mentioned like, if you throw something to me or I saw somebody you and the other person isn't kind of jumping off the wall about it, we know right away like it's not gonna happen or might not be worth pursuing.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, so I thought I'd do that all the time. That's Wow, parks are pretty much the same process and pretty much the same. It's, I mean, it's it's a great skill set to have though, right? Like you've you've each got kind of your, your lanes that you swim in and you teach each other along the way and you learn from each other along the way but you're also not afraid to you know, jump over and tell the guy you're not quite doing the right thing right now. And and it keeps the business on track. And it's it's not easy to do. I mean people people talk about that in any business that you know, influencing others and having those conversations is not an easy thing, but it's especially not easy when it's a friend you know, especially at the start like did you guys feel at the start like there was that friendship on the line feeling almost if you were starting a business together Did you know dive in headfirst? I was diving

Unknown:

for sure. But never it never crossed my mind. Like for me it was just excitement to be honest with you.

Seth Anderson:

I actually had another angle on that sort of thought though, because I was looking back at I was on elite prospects before this call having a gander at the old stat lines. Were where you guys linings in AAA Be sure someone had to take care of it. Yeah, right. And I'm just looking even that last year like parks, you had 32 points bros you had 47 which was just stupid and 106 pins to go along with it. Not that I mean someone had to take care of me. So now you guys are running a business by hindsight being 2020 some of those, you know, skills that are coming in handy being able to confront one another, be honest with each other. Can you trace some of those those relationship elements back to those days of playing hockey together?

Unknown:

Yeah. And Seth, I'm, I mean, I'm scared to maybe even share this. But we live together in that last year of midgets as well as that triple A year, and we slept in the same bed like,

Seth Anderson:

I moved in with Rosie. And I guess like from there, it was three o'clock in the morning, winning Madden, Super Bowl championships, gone bananas, like all that stuff, kind of we've talked about and it just so the tightness is it's just there, it's always been there. And it kind of always will be so a lot of those bonds forged in those years. And maybe you know, Parker will dive into your story a bit here first, though, from there, you want to spruce Grove play for the saints have an unbelievable run. cap that off with another unbelievable run and mini Duluth win a national championship as a captain, you know, you're only a couple of years removed from all of that. But when you look back and sort of that eight years, it's I don't know it? Was it eight years between those two stops like, yeah, seven eight, Jake? Yeah. Yeah, what did you learn about yourself? And I mean, I'm sure you're still learning a ton about yourself every day. But you know, if you'd look back at that timeframe, and how are you applying that to your life now?

Unknown:

Uh, yeah, big time. I think just there's a lot of learning curves in that. Seven years, even in midgets, too, but I think the most important one for me is being able to self evaluate myself. And that happens. I mean, that was happening after every game, or every day, I kind of knew when I played well, like, instantly, and that's something that I feel like, has helped me get to where I am today, just being able to hold myself accountable first. And over those eight years, or seven years, I think, finding ways to win, where whichever way it was, I mean, just learning the process and understanding that it is a process and that you're not going to make things happen right away all the time. And I guess that's the biggest part for even in the business side of things right now, like understanding the process, and that it's going to be slow maybe at times, but being able to stick with it and stay passionate about it and continuing continually find ways to succeed. I think in those seven years is a big part of, of my learning curve, for sure.

JP Gaston:

How did you? How did you keep them the positive mindset through that like that? Can't you know, you've got your ups? You've got your downs, how do you how do you stay positive, like you've done?

Unknown:

I don't know, really, I think it's just natural, honestly, like, just the way I've grown up, just being able to enjoy everything. And just, I literally am so thankful that I'm able to enjoy what I do. And what playing hockey showing up to the rink every day, some guys are a little bit negative at times. And it's like why, like, you're here with your best friends. You're playing the game you love, you're going to school, or you're not going to school, and you're just playing juniors, like there's a lot worse situations out there. I feel like so, I mean, even now, I'm not working a nine to five job, I'm trading a clothing company with my best friend and, and doing some skill development on the side and stuff like that, like what's not to love about the lifestyle that I'm living right now. And I kind of just I feel extremely fortunate, I guess. And so I've always kind of had that mindset.

Seth Anderson:

One thing I'm curious about, you know, in the hockey world, is, you know, your wins and losses are very defined, right, your objectives are clear, win as many games as you can grow as a player, teammate. And ultimately try to win a championship whatever level you're at, that's, that's, that's really what your goal is. I mean, you want to win a championship and you wanna be the best player you can be. And it's, it's relatively easy to measure those things because either you win, or you don't ship your products, especially when your products, how do you define success? Now, you know, in your post career, you're only a few months into that, but when you look at the business side, what what is what is good look like? How do you measure your wins? What is what does that look like for you?

Unknown:

Well, that's something that I'm still learning again, it's there's very similar things to I mean, the hockey world or the sports world and the business side of things, but being able to get sales and, and get yourself out there and network and I guess, create that work. And that's what's unreal. Well, Rosie and I, as we both have different networks and the same networks, we're both still rocking the hockey side of things. He's got firefighting, which is even better, but I feel like just being able to sell whatever we create, and whatever we do decide to build, like the hats like we sold, I think 90 in the first day, like that's a success, right? Like, I feel like whatever you are creating, we were setting out some polls and stuff like that as soon as you No, once you release those things, if they're selling right away To me, that's that's a success.

Seth Anderson:

But it's nice to get that success right away and, and get that momentum going. So super happy for you. And that's great. I guess pivoting over bros, you know, if you'd look at your junior hockey career, you know, un un Parker sort of entered that world and in a similar type of a place, and it didn't maybe go as well on your end, just from a pure hockey perspective. But what did you What did you learn in those few years about yourself? And what were some of the challenges that you've overcome to make you I know, you're a really amazing coach and I definitely want to get to that but sort of setting up your life and what came after hockey? What did you learn in those few years?

Unknown:

Yeah, so I kind of threw myself I guess I had been, I guess called it retired or I had stopped a little bit earlier than most of my peers just with the concussion stuff and a lot of other stuff that was going on as well. So through that it was there was honestly if I'm being completely honest, are some lonely times are they but if I didn't have my fiance is incredible. She has, I think I've been a completely different spot. She's been my rock through at all, like she's pushed me and continued to push me. Sometimes I I'd rather it not. But she's, she's been a rockstar in all honesty, and just continue to push me through. And I'll be forever thankful for her. As far as what I've learned stuff, kind of touching on what Parkes has talked about, I think I figured that out a little bit later in my life. As far as taking the losses, kind of learning from them. I think earlier, like, especially in my junior career, it was a lot I took it to heart, I found out I was one of the guys that was relied on heavily offensively. So if I wasn't producing it was a lot of it fell on my shoulders, I felt. So trying to try to take some weight off myself in a capacity has been something that I've tried to do a little bit, trying to allow myself to a begin to trust other people a lot more as well. And just beginning to beginning to surround myself with the people that I know I need to be around to in order to succeed in everyday life now. So as far as the business side, like parks here with this stuff, and then do the hockey stuff that the company we have up here like just surrounding myself with the right people and allowing them to carry some of the load as well. I feel like it's something that I've learned. It doesn't have to be just myself or relied on myself, I feel like I put a lot of pressure on myself. If I'm being honest, I feel like a lot of coaches did as well. I feel like that's something that I've been trying to trying to work on is just reminding myself that you have people in your corner and using them kind of not using them. Sorry, that's not the right word, but having them in my corner and allowing them to work with me.

Seth Anderson:

You know, for those who don't know, I mean, you and I spent the better part of a year together. That was a long time ago now. like six years ago. Yeah, no kidding. And I actually think about it and you actually came out to a practice one time parks and it was the three of us hawks wasn't there that day. And we ran a practice. I don't know if you guys remember this, but there was my favorite practice the whole year. And I've talked about, you know, my time with the the bisons and jamming and coaching and what that all meant to me. And that year in particular, you know, when I kind of stepped up and took the coaching reins when every part of my body was telling me not to do that. And I had every rational reason not to, and just did it anyway. And the things that I learned that year about myself about others about leadership. It was amazing. And I know Ambrose, you went down that road, you kind of you were probably more in the coaching realm than the playing realm, you kind of got on the ice for a few games there. But you are a big part from you know, helping me even see what a good leader was. And I thank you for that. What inspired you to go down the coaching road at that point? Because I mean, I know you got involved with the bisons, the next year, you're basically only a few months older than the players and you got right in there and ended up winning a national a Western Canadian championship the following year. But what what inspired you to get right into coaching outside of when you were done playing?

Unknown:

I think right away, Seth, I knew I knew something I needed to be around and continue to be around. It's always been something since I was two years old, or as far as I can remember that it's something that I wanted to do. And I wasn't gonna let that concoction take that from me. And then like I've mentioned already just kind of the things I learned through being a player that I wanted to pass down to the kids as well. Like a lot of the offensive bearing that I talked about earlier, like you see that still even in coaching kids like you see them, they're putting all the pressure on themselves again. So just being able to go through kind of what I went through and being able to see it from the player side, I think it's very easy to still relate to the players. And I think I think being able to get through to them or try to get through them. Like you're not going to get through to everyone but I think just the odd bits and pieces here where you do get through and you can just see the difference that actually makes in their lives. I think that part is not part it's incredible to me.

Seth Anderson:

Do you have any? You know, in the first few years that you've been doing the coaching thing is there any stories or Kids that stand out where, you know, you've really feel like, maybe not you made an impact on their life, but you created the space for them to grow in a way that you maybe didn't expect. And you're just super proud of them.

Unknown:

Yeah, absolutely. Like there's, I would say, on any given team that I've had here in the last five years, I think there's anywhere from two to five kids on each team that you, you just you drastically see. And it's not only the hockey side, like outsides always gonna be there, for a lot of these kids, like, as far as the skills or whatever that may be, like, a lot of these kids already have that stuff. It's just, it's fine tuning out. So that stuff's a blast to do, I like making a difference personally. So to me, it means a lot when they break up with their girlfriend, and they're giving me a phone call, or just stuff like that, when they're having issues and they know that they can come to me, I take a lot of pride in outside of it, just the personal side, being able to feel and just be there for them to be completely honest, like with whatever I whatever they need, like if their haircuts, or whatever the case may be like, I'll be the one that will be honest with them. Or if they need, if they need a pat on the back, I'll give them that as well. So I think that's where it goes back to me just being able to relate to them still. So I really enjoyed that part.

JP Gaston:

Did you develop that from somebody? Like were you inspired by somebody along the way? Or were it was that something that you found, you didn't have. And so you've made sure to make it a part of your coaching.

Unknown:

Think a bit of both like my my culture, major Kyle top, he was really good with this stuff, too. And then obviously, I've been working around him up here in Lloyd two with the ice hockey side. So getting to know him a little bit more, and then looking back at my career, you have a lot of time to reflect and not playing. So looking back at it and being able to see kind of not I don't want to say neglected, that's not the right word, I don't think but it's not enough time has put into the personal side. And partially, you can probably touch on this as you played a little bit higher. But as you get there, it's more it turns into a job. Right? So coaches are more or less wanting to if you don't perform, it's not. It's not a sit down like Hey, is there anything we can do? Or like, hey, did your girlfriend break up with you? Like, what's the case, it's just like, if you're not performing, you're just you're not gonna play. So this time and outside I think is where coaches even at the higher level, in my opinion can maybe not change, but they can change your mindset a little bit with that, like if if there's stuff going on off the ice, they're not going to perform on the ice for you. So I think, especially with today's athlete, like you're just seeing it so often if you don't take care of yourself off the ice, it's gonna be impossible, impossible to perform, I believe. Honestly, I

Seth Anderson:

think that that spills over into the workplace, I think JP, yeah. That like you can't, you can't just lead by blunt force, like, hey, go reach this metric, or go score this goal. And if you don't, you're out like it just people are human. And we need to realize leadership, I believe that's our job as leaders in whatever position we're in, whether it's running a company coaching, managing a business, whatever, we're leaders, and you're nothing without your people. So I love that you said that, because that hits on, I think a really important point. That's, that's affecting the entire world, not just the hockey world, it's everywhere, like, people need to feel safe. I completely agree with that. Just to touch on that pros,

Unknown:

like, you know, you nailed it, like, that's why he's had the success he's had since he's been done playing and coaching because he can relate to these kids. And these young, especially the young, like, adults, I mean, I guess at the end of the day, some coaches right now, a lot of them are expecting you to perform, because you're the one that's putting food on their table, essentially. So if you didn't look at it in that manner, and you actually cared about your athletes and the people that are performing for you, I feel like you'd have even more success. So just to be able to take a step back sometimes as these as these older coaches maybe and just realize that in order for these kids to perform, they need to, like you said, Seth feel safe. And I think that's very important message. I think the biggest thing too, like even though I don't want to go too far into it partially, but just my thought were even when you're saying that, like if it's a we'll call it a skill guy, if he's not being skilled that night, there's a chance that there's something going on, he's not choosing, he's not choosing to not be skilled, or if there's a third line checking guy or whatever the case may be, you can relate it anywhere. If they're not where you're expecting them to be, there's a chance something's going on. Otherwise, like there's no there's no real, I wouldn't call it an excuse, but there's no real reason that it's not other than something's happening, whether they're not feeling well or like I've used the girlfriend excuse a few times, like it's, that's kind of what I've learned a lot through dealing with athletes here in the last five years, is if if they're not doing what is expected or what you see the mouse or what you've talked to them about or what they expect of themselves.

Seth Anderson:

I think asking those questions will open up a lot of doors as far as even just development and performance wise as well as helping them individually. One building skills beyond the rank as well. And one of the things and when I mentioned safety there, my thought was in the vein of like psychological safety, like being feeling that you can, you know, say something and you're not going to be punished for it, you know, you can, you could, you could talk about the issue you're having with your girlfriend and you're not going to get traded or, you know, kicked off the team or whatever like that. There's a certain level of psychological safety that I think is been missing in that environment. And, and so proud and happy to hear that you guys are conscious of that and bringing that to the forefront because it's important, and it's been long overlooked. I think parks the other the other thing that I've been thinking about a lot lately, and JP knows he's probably heard me say it, like 100 times is great leaders and great coaches create space, like the space they create is is productive. It's positive, it's conducive, it's, you know, you guys talked about it earlier, you guys can confront each other on a bet on an idea, you can kind of have not necessarily have at it. But there's a space there where you guys are comfortable enough to have confrontation, or to talk about the good things like there's a space created. And I just wonder, from your perspective, because you've been a part of such great programs. We talked about a little bit whether it was Lloyd sprues, many to lose. What did you see from some of the coaches or leaders there? What kind of space did they create that allowed that type of performance to occur?

Unknown:

Yeah, I think just especially in spruce Grove, it was more of like the systems and our coach there. Jason McKee, us, I feel very good coach, especially when it comes to systems and stuff. wasn't as much of that mindset, he was more of a harder coach like he was hard to play for and stuff like that. But again, he he did understand at times if there were issues, but he was also really good. Like there wasn't rookies weren't unloading the bus. If they're like, you couldn't chew on the bus. There was no like, it was cut and dry that way, like everybody was equal there. And that's what helped create that space. fair

Seth Anderson:

and equitable across the board. Yeah,

Unknown:

yeah, absolutely. Like, if you were going to hate anyone, you hate him, but you're not gonna hate each other. Like, it's not gonna be vets and rookies, if that makes sense. Yeah. So I feel like there with that atmosphere in that culture. That's where a lot of success came from. And then I feel just in Duluth, it was, it was similar, but there's just a lot of again, accountability, but more so you see it from the coaches, like they're the ones holding themselves accountable first, they do so much preparation to allow us to succeed. It's video, it's on ice, it's on the board. So you're seeing it three different ways and just how they go about that. And then at the end of the day, yeah, they're still gonna hold you accountable. But I think, realizing that there's a line that you can cross nowadays and, and they do a very good job of not crossing that line. So I mean, yeah, every coach still in today's game is gonna come in and then intermission and probably read me out if you're not playing well. But you can't just it can't all be on these coaches to baby every single athlete that they have either. So I think a little bit of atmosphere there was really good at both at both places, especially in Minnesota, Duluth, but, um, yeah, they were also just, it's toeing that line at the same time.

Seth Anderson:

I think that's a great point too, because, you know, psychological safety, creating a space leadership. Some of those things get coined as, like baby and kids or you know, all that kind of stuff. But I really think like, if you feel safe, if you feel like your coaches got your back, if you feel like they have your best interest at heart, you're just going to perform at a different level and you're going to be more open, you're going to be a little bit you're not going to hold your stick as tight. If you make a mistake, you're not going to be mopey, and have your head down like you're just going to get back up and if you're allowed to make mistakes and in that environment and I guess you know burrows maybe back to you what what do you try to do you know, I know your coach in high level now triple A, what what kind of environment do you try to create as a as a coach,

Unknown:

I think exactly that like Park she's talked about, but we've been able to do here is we try and prepare better than anyone would a junior a better than anyone would anywhere else. We barely try and instill that in our kids. So instilling the confidence right away like Parkes already touched on, they know firsthand that we're putting the work in. So it allows them time to kind of explain Parsis already touched on so much of it, and it allows them to feel that much more confident in what we're saying and what they're what we're bringing to them, I guess if that makes sense stuff and just outside of it, allowing them to see the preparation and allowing them to be part of video sessions at times and allowing them to be part of different stuff and constant meetings with kids where, like we're only at the AAA level, but we're having meetings with kids, daily, weekly, whatever they need, the door's always open and you always hear this open door policy. You don't see it very often but the kids that have played for us will be able to back that up that whatever they need. They know the doors open or the phone's always open and allowing them to know that we're there to care. It really has been the biggest thing I've tried to do.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, I love that the open door policy is a great policy, but people will only come to your open door if they feel psychologically safe.

Unknown:

Right? Yeah, 100%. And I think sometimes you got it, you got to be able to seek that out too. You can visually see or you just see, you get to know the kids well enough that you can pick up on some things pretty quickly. So as long as they feel comfortable, even if you ask the question first, as a coach, like they're, they're more than willing to open up. And a lot of times, it'll lead to something that the player themselves didn't even realize.

Seth Anderson:

And that's coaching a lot of times is sometimes you need to tell the kid what they don't want to hear. And absolutely, you know, you're not doing anyone any service if you just kind of let them keep making the same mistake over and over again. And, you know, Parker, again, maybe back to you, you've had a ton of success. Is there a moment you can think of where a coach told you something that in the moment you're like, furious, but it actually maybe made you a better player and help you get to another level that you didn't know you had?

Unknown:

Yeah, I think so. And I can't like put a finger on it, specifically, but I feel like it's way better to hear that stuff as an athlete, even if they're saying it a little bit more in like a pissed off manner. But I'd rather hear the honesty than it just just not here at all. And then maybe you show up the next day, and you're on the third or fourth line or something like that are out of the lineup. And you don't know why. And that's what's frustrating. And that's where I feel like Rosie, I can already tell like, if you're gonna do like, if you're going to reprimand somebody, at least give them the opportunity to know why and understand why they're maybe being sad. Or if you are giving them all these tools to be successful, and they're choosing not to be successful again. I'm not putting that on me. I'm putting that on the athlete, in

Seth Anderson:

my opinion. 100% was same as business, right? Yeah. Can you can you give all the tools and it's a it turns out, it's a will not a skill and someone isn't coachable? Like that's a totally different conversation. And I think that applies in whatever

JP Gaston:

vocation you, you do. That's the coaching side. What about the athletes side? Like what advice would you give to a to an athlete who's maybe in some of those situations where they're either not getting that feedback, or even they are getting that feedback, and they're not sure how to handle it and what to do with it.

Unknown:

I think a lot of that is on a player as well, they need to the player and the coach need to figure out themselves kind of how they operate. There's a lot of kids, I'd say it's a 5050 split, there's some kids on each team where you might need to kick them in the ass a little bit more. I would say there's 50% on a team that you're going to need to kind of baby a little bit more until they fully trust you. And it's a lot more to get in. And I think as long as as long as they keep their eyes open and they keep the just the open policy. They'll be brain like nothing's ever shut off. I think as long as you try your your damnedest, it's going to be tough at times, like parks and Seth have already mentioned like you're going to hear stuff you don't want to hear that's part of that's not just part of sport, that's part of life. Yeah, I think if you can learn that right away, and it's not, it's not that we're coming down as a coach to be to be negative towards you. It shouldn't be. If anything, if you can take what we're saying or what anyone's telling you in any aspect. That's just something to learn from. I think you're going to be better from it. Like anything that's being corrected. Whether you believe it's 100%, right, or 100%. Wrong. I think that's where a lot of athletes end up getting into trouble, we'll call it is they kind of have their own mindset already. And they're just not open. Have you.

Seth Anderson:

I've been actually reading this book, I think you'd like it. Burroughs. It's called mindset by Dr. Carol Dweck. And it's sort of the science behind it. She did a lot of study on Oprah or growth mindset versus fixed mindset. And we had a we had a guy on the show a couple weeks back, probably like a month back now. Jason Krauss and he also has a book that I think you guys would like called the science behind success. And he was actually a professional bobsledder. So he was on the Canadian national team. And he missed going to the Olympics by a blades with like, this much. And, you know, at the time, absolutely devastated. Like he said he was in the worst place has ever been in his life. He trained for eight years. And and just missed. Anyway, he now looks back on and says the best thing that ever happened to him because it led him down His life path and all that he's figured out since then. But that is this book mindset he recommended as must read for anybody in who's coaching or leading anyone. And it's a bit dry at times. It's like 10 hour long audio, listen, but there's a lot of research on this whole fixed mindset versus growth mindset. And what I'm learning is you can actually spot it, barely, I want to say easily, like there's some pretty common things that people do and I think the points that you just made about, you know, half the kids, you kind of got a baby, half the kids you can sort of come down a little bit harder on A lot of that comes back to like fixed mindset versus growth mindset. So anyway, I'm just sharing that with you. Because I think it's, it's interesting once you know how a kid ticks and you can change, right like you can, you can start out in a fixed mindset based on your world and what you're living in, and your conditions, but you can actually start to move towards a growth mindset. Once you become cognizant of it, and someone's there to kind of help you through it.

Unknown:

I've actually been thinking lately a lot, and I came up with a little quote that I've really started to fall in love with, and like just failure leads to success if it's taken the right way. I think everyone in the world other than Parker, MCI has a failure, that you're gonna end up if taken the right way. I truly, I truly think that you can turn them into successes, whether it's just a learning curve, or something you learn from it again, other than parks, that guy just succeeds. But for the most part, I think that kind of applies to most people.

Seth Anderson:

Most humans are something of a gimme go.

Unknown:

I do want to add, just like and not to get too deep, again. But on that fixed mindset or growth mindset, I think a lot of it is just respect and like, I've co like just started coaching this HSL team a little bit, and you can see it in some factors. And maybe I look too deep into it. But for me respect is how do you treat someone who is below you or beneath you that maybe can't offer you anything, right? And being able to everybody has a message or something to offer. So being able to take everyone's, I guess positive nature, whether maybe they are good at systems, maybe a coach is good at systems, but he doesn't relate it very well. Or maybe somebody is always negative, you can always learn from people, no matter what they are, even if they do offer you something, right. So I think that's where that growth mindset comes into play big time.

JP Gaston:

I think I mentioned it quite recently on a pod. But there's 8 billion people on the planet, the odds that you are the best at something is pretty minimal. And even if you are the best, there are other things that you can, you can do, right? Like there's other things you can learn and there's other like people you can learn from. So take the opportunity.

Seth Anderson:

Absolutely. I can vibe on this on the mindset stuff all day long. It's interesting, though, like, having spent many years in the hockey world, and I'll be honest, my youth of playing hockey or my the youth, my words are not making sense. When I played hockey when I was a kid, it was not the best experience as a poor kid started late at this old jofa lead like the I don't know if you guys you guys might be too young and had like the big like lines on a JP nose on talking about his helmet. Anyway, I had a bad experience. And so I left hockey for a long time, like a long, long, long time. And then I came back I put my hand up to leave the bisons and I think the only reason I was selected is because literally nobody else wanted to do it. And I remember walking in there and you know, I had no credibility. I hadn't played hockey since I was like 12 years old. I don't know anything about systems. I've watched hockey, like I'm the biggest hockey fan in the world at the time, I named my kid after Trevor Linden, like I was all in on hockey, but I hadn't been in a local hockey rink in 10 years. And he brought up the point there about a coach might not know something about systems or he might not be as good at that. And like everybody gets fixated on like the systems part. And I can tell you like we talked a little bit about that last year when I coached we went 30 to two and one. I mean, you were there bros it was a pretty good group of guys. We probably should have won at all we didn't. But like I didn't know Shabbat systems. Right un brought Hoxton. You know, there was everybody there knows about systems. But it was much in my estimation, much more about creating the environment, the leadership, getting everyone bought in excited having fun again, that was the magic of the season. It didn't have to do with systems.

Unknown:

Yeah, no, absolutely. I think I don't know how much credit you've gotten for that program down there when it's tough, but you deserve a lot of it for the culture. Like that's exactly nails what you just read, I think everyone in the room. And I don't want this to sound rude by any means. But everyone in the room knew that as well. And I think you'd even brought it up a few times, just Hey, like, I'm not I'm not the smartest talking coach, I'm not going to draw you the perfect PowerPoint. I'm not going to do this. But the way you're able to bring everyone together. And there was it was incredible to just be able to watch and be a part of it just towards the end of the year, like what you're able to do and just as far as the team side went like it was, yeah. There's a reason we all still get together. Yeah.

Seth Anderson:

So anyway, Parks up that point just triggered something there because yeah, absolutely. That's awesome. It's great to hear. There's so much wine, and it's the same in the business world too. I mean, I'm sure you guys have come up against it, right, like you didn't, I mean, you went and got your schooling and everything. But you know, all of a sudden you get into the business world and you're 789 years of playing hockey doesn't mean ship and you kind of got to start from, from the ground up. But I promise you, those skills, those mindsets, the things that you learned, as long as you keep that growth mindset and keep learning and growing. You're going to be Usually successful.

Unknown:

Absolutely. No, I I agree Seth and I appreciate it. That's awesome. Great story too.

Seth Anderson:

So maybe on on the way out of here, we've already been going for almost an hour here. I feel like I could do this all day. What what are you guys's goals for shoot your shot? I mean, I know it's I think it's more than just clothes. I mean, you kind of talked about the brand the lifestyle what what's your guys's plans for this whole thing?

Unknown:

Yeah, for me honestly, the start was just clothing and that's where I like I said like working with broses opened up the social media and not only that, but the mindset thing and I think we've we've kind of cohorted with entertainments or company out of Lloyd there and they want to get our story out we want to get our story out so I think that that's where broses helped me significantly is and that's where I feel like we just we add more it's it's more than just apparel that you're representing you're representing a lifestyle and I think that's the important part here and again, all credits ambrozy there because when he brought up the hats and stuff like that, then the hoodies and that we want to start this company my envision was just let's sell apparel, right but I think there is definitely something more there and we can relate to a lot of people so yeah, I guess just to touch on or even a little bit deeper poxy exactly where you're going with it just the sheer shot the mentality I think a lot of people through through I've been doing in the last little while up here and Lloyd getting to know a lot of different people just throughout the whole province of the country and even the world just different conversations I've had with people in different different readings different stuff I've been looking into and you just hear so often of how boring work is or how boring you're at home life is how boring the weekends can get how boring and just to me it's just not not something I've ever really lived by kind of a park she touched on at the very start double lovingly does and being able to kind of put himself in those shoes where he's able to do what he enjoys. I think that's kind of where it all come from and in my brain anyways just honestly shooting your shot taking the risk. It might mean less money it might mean whatever the case but I think if you if you can truly try and make yourself happy in that in that scenario. I don't think there's any way you're going to lose so to me that's exactly what we're trying to I guess put forward and I think a lot of people are kind of build steam behind that. So I'm looking forward to see what American take this stuff.

Seth Anderson:

That was a quote JP That was beautiful. Well done, bro. What do you guys working on personal development wise? I mean, you know, it's a little tougher when you're you know, you don't have a game to get up for to you know, make sure you go to the gym and all those kinds of things. But what how do you guys stay motivated? Any podcast books? What do you What are you guys doing to stay sharp?

Unknown:

While we're both honestly extremely busy. I'm still working out though. A little bit like that lifestyle I don't want to get rid of but yeah, we've all we've talked about doing like a sandbagger thing or, or some type of like building off of what spit and Chiclets does maybe getting some golf episodes out there. And I think just honestly, again, we kind of go day by day and I feel like that's what has helped us and maybe it's we we live it a little bit slower but we're starting to roll here. But in my opinion, that's that's kind of where we're at so and where I'm at personally.

Seth Anderson:

Are you gonna take a run at like the Canadian amateur circuit there?

Unknown:

Yeah, we've been we've been doing a lot of golfing a lot of golfing lately so it's always something fun I mean, I love the game so anytime I can improve but it would be fun to maybe enter a tournament on a weekend or something. So

Seth Anderson:

What's up bro to be like a Canadian champion in the next five years

Unknown:

that's fine by me bro to be on my bag. Anything on your walking like dagger a car kind of got

Seth Anderson:

anything on your side pros that you're working on?

Unknown:

I'm personally I think Seth since I've stopped it's just been first I've just I've tried to never be satisfied are things it's a it's a different mindset and it's kind of tough at times. I think along with the successes and the ones that are gonna continue to come I just I'm never gonna be satisfied with it. I think for me it's always that growth mindset that we talked about taking the little wins as they come but always always wanting more. I don't I don't want to leave anything left on the table when time comes so living everything I can to the absolute fullest with that side and just like I said, leave no stone unturned any aspect

JP Gaston:

where can where can people learn more about shoot your shot and whatever else you guys happen to be up to?

Unknown:

Yes, we actually we got a website at www dot shoot your shot dot shop. That's also been another learning curve that we've been trying to figure it out kind of as we roll, the whole nother whole nother beast that we never even really

Seth Anderson:

We know that Yeah,

Unknown:

absolutely. So that's where that's where the website is. Our social media stuff is all shooter shot. So we're on Facebook, Instagram, all that stuff there, we're actually going to be releasing our polos, I believe tomorrow or the next day poxy. I'm not 100% sure on that one yet. We're just waiting to get some pictures done up. So those will be good to get out. We're looking forward to getting everything all we got some more hats coming in here should be this week, too. So a bunch more stuff. It's pretty cool. We get to see, we get to see everyone checking out our website. So we have anywhere from seven to 20 kind of visitors a day still. So trying to build that and make sure you get everything out there and have everything everyone wants. So you have any recommendations from our way and we'll Docker sum up for you? Absolutely.

JP Gaston:

Parks's gotta wear those polos on Canadian. Yeah, we got

Seth Anderson:

I feel like a you know, maybe some purple like the like the Sunday reds a nice biz dojo Limited Edition. Absolutely. Get behind that. We can talk you can talk. Absolutely. Unreal.

Unknown:

But again, like just even you guys doing this and having us on like, this is another way to share our story and share what the company is about. And I think we're gonna do a couple videos just talking to our entertainment guy and kind of just even sharing it on our lot or on our website and, and on Instagram, and Facebook and everything helps. So

Seth Anderson:

we'll be we'll be sharing this all over the world. We've had downloads and how many content continents are there? JP, I forget.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, we haven't we arctica listens yet, but every other continent is covered. Wow. That's awesome, though. Andrew. will be you start getting orders from like Denmark, and we'll know who to send the money to. Yeah, sorry about the shipping. And that might hurt. Awesome.

Seth Anderson:

Oh, we really appreciate you guys dropping by today. Thanks for coming to first season finale. We're super excited to share with everyone and wish you guys the best of luck. And I'm sure this will not be the last time we have you in the dojo. Yeah, thank you very much for having us. I was unreal. Again. Appreciate it. Thank you very much, guys.

Voiceover:

Thanks to Parker MCI and Ambrose Fergus for joining us today. From shoot your shot. Visit, shoot your shot dot shop today. Now stay tuned for the podium. Brought to you by beyond the beaten path visit beyond the beaten path.ca. Well,

Seth Anderson:

there you have it, folks. Season Two is now complete. Big thanks to Barker and Ambrose for hopping in the dojo with us a great time catching up with those guys. And I have a sneaking suspicion like many of our guests, that will not be the last time that we see them in the dojo,

JP Gaston:

and there'll be a rubber match.

Seth Anderson:

So with that, and heading into I guess, our season finale of the podium. We are that brings a tear to the eye. Yeah,

JP Gaston:

everything's a finale right now,

Seth Anderson:

we need some time to recoup and regenerate our creativity on our top three lists, I think and leave our houses and leave our houses and be inspired by new and different things. So this week on the beyond the beaten path podium, we are going to switch it up a little bit. Yeah,

JP Gaston:

we're gonna we're still gonna, we're still gonna have a top, we'll combine our threes. So we really have a top six.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah. Well, I don't even know if you can put a number on it. We've we've got a top bunch of you can't sustain stay with us for a minute. Cuz I think, you know, we really want to take a moment here. And thank everybody that helped make this season possible.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, June, June 1 National say something nice day. And we would like to say something nice to all of the folks who have really helped contribute to the show whether, you know, now or in previous seasons, I say seasons, the previous season.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, and I think, you know, one of the things for me that I've been dabbling with is just thanking people, genuinely without any. Absolutely. Hey, I appreciate you. So if you're listening to this podcast, if you've been on this podcast, if you've liked shared retweeted something from the podcast, if you have recommended a guest if you've like if you've done anything in any way that has helped to promote our community or the environment that we're trying to create, if you've shared something you heard on the podcast, whatever the case may be, just know that we appreciate you. We do. We really do.

JP Gaston:

And you know, I think it's It starts with our listeners. I was thinking maybe we we end on our listeners, but really, I want to start on our listeners, you whoever this, whoever is enjoying this ear candy right now, thank you for taking the time out of your day to listen. And many of you have provided feedback as well about how we can change and improve the show and really get you what you need. And the show started out, you know all about Seth and I wanting to learn to lead better ourselves and hoping that what we learned would be able to be shared with others, and they take something from it. And clearly you have, and you're offering your insight into how we can make it even better. We love that.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, and there's a few listeners that come to mind. I mean, I think there's some that like every single post we put out. So we appreciate that a lot. whether any on LinkedIn and Instagram seem to be the two most active places. So you know, we appreciate you taking the time to hit that like button, it means they mean something to us, you know, someone's someone's listening, someone's taking something from it, someone's growing maybe as a leader, and we appreciate you letting us know.

JP Gaston:

And it helps like the other thing is, we want you to do it organically if if it is something that you like or that you want to subscribe to do it. But every time that happens, it helps get in front of another user somewhere else who might take something away from the show. So every one of those likes, subscriptions follows. Comments, views are helpful. Yeah, absolutely.

Seth Anderson:

All of it. So thank you for everyone that has done that to this point. Next on our list of folks, we'd like to thank maybe the suppliers or people that we've worked with, you know, to help promote their products and they've helped us on the other side as well. So Sasquatch coffee comes to mind. Sasquatch coffee right now it's delightful. I had some this morning. Obviously we had them on chopping it up. That seems like a lifetime ago as well in

JP Gaston:

a roundabout way they've been on every single episode. They've had a coffee with The Biz Dojo dark or a medium roast with me almost every single time.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah. And you know, we've been able to grow their base of coffee lovers with well over 100 pounds of dojo, dark roast and masters medium created and delivered out to the folks who listen to the show. So

JP Gaston:

and soon it will be available on Amazon. So Amazon more more to come.

Seth Anderson:

Another exciting thing you know, we're we're hoping, hoping that'll help grow the distribution a little bit, but it's been it's been a lot of fun getting in the coffee game. Also, you know, we have to well, you know, obviously this episode was with with Parker and Ambrose from shoot your shot. I feel like I wear their hoodie and hat just about every day now. So love representing not just the brand but what it stands for. Right like shoot your shot. I think we actually exchanged text messages almost certainly weekly where it's like I shot a shot.

JP Gaston:

I also think it's funny that we've we've now done so many video and audio like this is we're recording right now for the sake of the podcast. But we've done so much video that I mean for the benefit of the listeners, Seth you know tilt his head down every time he talks about shoot your shot to make sure that if we are doing video that you know you can see the hat and it's it's a great hat. Great and he's not lying. He wears

Seth Anderson:

no and we we just did a episode of sports journeys. It's Conor McLennan and completely unplanned but he was here with his shoot your shot gear as well. So yeah, it's you know, it's great to see those guys having success and on the other side of that or I don't know the other side but to top that up as Stephen living still, I think maybe the company is hoodie that I own, you know, those those Cold Spring mornings when I want to go for a coffee on the deck there. That's the hoodie like that. That's what I'm taking with me.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, my wife walked downstairs weighing in today.

Seth Anderson:

There you go. Steph has claimed it.

JP Gaston:

Yep. Yep. I like all my hoodies. But that that is now the one that gets torn because it's just so comfortable. It's like wearing one of those like fleece lined sleeping bags. So good. Yeah.

Seth Anderson:

I yeah. 100%. So shout out to staff. He's doing amazing things. It's awesome that we, you know, are connected with, I don't ever have to go to a store and buy clothing again. Just go online and live in and shoot your shot as long

JP Gaston:

as you need to know.

Seth Anderson:

That's funny. You

JP Gaston:

need an undergarments.

Seth Anderson:

Awesome. Did you did you want to tackle the sponsors JP,

JP Gaston:

we never got into this game intending to you know, become a sponsor podcast, for lack of a better term sellout. But as we joked about earlier in the season, we sold out. Really, really the sponsors have helped us do the things that we need to be able to do to get this show to as many people as we can. So they've They've helped foot the bill for you know, putting together the podcast putting together the video stuff, making sure that

Seth Anderson:

putting together that everything table that I'm broadcasting to you from right now,

JP Gaston:

the sign in behind you, so we're really thankful for our sponsors be on the beaten path

Seth Anderson:

you know, we'd love all of our sponsors equally but we got to give a huge huge shout out to be on a beaten path for

JP Gaston:

a one day one from day one. Believing in the show before the show was a show and the concept of the show super thankful for that and for being on the podium for being on chopping it up for supplying not only us but many of our listeners when they reach out to get personalized items providing promotional material like just fantastic so really appreciate be on the beaten path. Did you on to the next one

Seth Anderson:

sure dq grill and chill Airdrie you know really appreciate the support from them, you know, they made I don't know I'm gonna call it a big bet on us and we just really appreciate their support. And you know, without them I don't know that we would be in a position where right now we're we're you know, incorporating as a company and we're sort of setting the wheels in motion to to take this thing to the next level and whatever that entails. So really appreciate them stepping up and believing in us and also, you know, I love I love blizzards like very few other things in my life. So I'm happy to have happy to represent,

JP Gaston:

especially that New Girl Guides. Man lizard. It's a good day to go get one

Seth Anderson:

I tell you, actually it's a good week.

JP Gaston:

So if you're in Calgary or Airdrie it's a great week to go get a blizzard because it supposed to be in like high 20s low 30s all week.

Seth Anderson:

You know if I was picking a desert for my last meal, maybe we'll do that as a podium topic in season three.

JP Gaston:

Last week, perfect.

Seth Anderson:

Girl guide Blizzard, I don't know what else would Trump that in the desert category.

JP Gaston:

My my plan for my next Blizzard is to try a mix of girl guide and cookie dough. See?

Seth Anderson:

I don't know, man, I don't know if you mess with the classic. But let me know.

JP Gaston:

Let me know I just need to dry. And then I mean, the other, the other sponsor that we definitely need to mention done in one creating the dojo when

Seth Anderson:

we are just the biz. So appreciate the work that that you've done and for for believing in us as well. No big thanks to all three of those companies. And you know, we look forward to working together in the future. And we'll see what season three holds. But we really thank all of you and appreciate you. We've got our guests on the show would not be the show without you. Rough count. We've had about 34 different individuals in either the podcast chopping it up, or sports journeys, our new YouTube show. That's a lot of people

JP Gaston:

when I think of that include our our reporter in the field.

Seth Anderson:

No, no. So it's probably up over 40 if you include that. Yes,

JP Gaston:

yeah. Yeah, we've had a few.

Seth Anderson:

So thank you. I mean, I don't know if we can go through and list everybody you know what

JP Gaston:

listeners can go through and list everybody by listening to each other? Over the summer while we're not here?

Seth Anderson:

Yes,

JP Gaston:

yes, you can? Where would be the best way to say thank you to both them and us.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, and if you have any feedback or or anything that you'd like to share with them any any feedback that we've ever gotten from an episode we've passed on directly to the, to the individual who was on the show, so

JP Gaston:

but every single guest is really taking a chance on us, right? Like they're giving up their time, their energy to come here and have a conversation with two guys who hopefully know what they're talking about. And, you know, a good time and

Seth Anderson:

we're creating a space and we're asking some pretty candid questions sometimes and you know, people need to be vulnerable to some degree to be open some of the things that we ask and and then trusting enough that we're going to represent them well, with the final recording and, you know, treat treat that conversation with no dignity and respect. And I think we honor that like that means a lot to us that they would trust us with that.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, for sure. And it's not I mean, it's not it's not every show that branches out and you know, gets a top chefs and gets CEO and gets nonprofits and gets and that makes it that makes it makes it harder on the guests to determine whether or not it's a show that they should be a part of.

Seth Anderson:

I remember one day where we recorded I want to say Did we record with with Darryl and Rachel and Jacob and tray, like all within 24 hours and I can't think of like for more diverse different conversations. And I remember at the end of it just being like, wow, that was like running a mental marathon because you know, the questions you ask, you know, Trey, for example, young up and coming basketball player, versus they're all CFO for hire. Like, it's just, there's a lot of range required to wrap your head and do the research and then get into it.

JP Gaston:

Well, and those, I mean, those were kind of on the heels of Marius, and like, just, yeah, it's it's a little mental gymnastics sometimes to work through, but we try, and we try and do that, to bring the best out of the guests that that we can,

Seth Anderson:

I think what I'm most proud of is, you know, as as a show, and, you know, as the creators of it, is, I'm proud of everything we've put out, like, there's nothing I've put that we've put out that I wouldn't put my name beside at this point. And, you know, like, we haven't rushed, anything we haven't compromised, I think the integrity of the show are what we're trying to do. And therefore, you know, I think that leaves us in a pretty good place as we wind down the season.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, absolutely.

Seth Anderson:

So with that, like you mentioned, we'll be doing some stuff over the next few months. Check out our website, things. You know, there's, there's some new things popping up there all the time. I think we're gonna fire up a mailing list so that we can kind of keep people up to date a little bit more. And, you know, keep up with the social and and we've got some really cool creative things that we're we're working on on the side here.

JP Gaston:

Yeah. And we've got, the other thing that we should probably mention is we've got the coaching service that we've that we've started, and I guess also thankful for the clients who have taken a chance on us as as coaches.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, it's early days. But I think both you and I are coaches, by nature, and by trade in a lot of ways. And, you know, if you're looking for some personal development, support, and help to get to the next level of whatever it is you're trying to get to, we'd like to help you.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, for sure. And our last, I guess, our last think, families,

Seth Anderson:

or families, yeah.

JP Gaston:

Give it giving up time for us to, you know, be able to sit in our basements, and, and record and edit and throw this thing together and make it a success. You know, those those awards that we've gotten the accolades that come from people, they're as much all of the support system that we have in place as they are hours, if not more, so really, really thankful for, you know, Steph, and Declan and I would also say my parents and sisters and brothers, my sister, sorry, Mel, sister, and brother, the rest of my extended family for supporting the show, and, you know, making it a part of their social network and sharing with their friends and colleagues. And, you know, it's it's helped to get the show out there. And it's not unnoticed by any means. Really appreciate it.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah. 100% I mean, I would echo those sentiments, Caitlin Lin, and Jovi, you know, they know when dad's podcasting, and it takes time, and it's not just one where in the booth, stop reading around

JP Gaston:

dad's podcast, they,

Seth Anderson:

like you mentioned, though, it's not just when we're in the booth or in the dojo, the amount of effort I know, you know, for you with the the editing and the audio engineering and all that kind of stuff. You know, I can't thank you enough for making that sacrifice. To do that, and then, you know, I think the other side of it is finding guests and show themes and interview. Like, there's a lot, there's a lot that goes into it. You know, basically when we're not in our day job, or we're not with our family, I think this is what we've decided to do with our time. And it's been hugely worthwhile. And the friendships and connections we've made, I think will last a lifetime. But we do definitely need to thank those that have sacrificed and supportive along the way.

JP Gaston:

All right, I run out of Kleenex.

Seth Anderson:

I think Lastly, you know, lastly, lastly, lastly, this the third, lastly, the final, the final, final. Lastly, we are all in on on going for the world record for longest podcast, I think at this point. So that is probably going to be all consuming in some ways for the next couple of months. And then we've gotten to require support from our families again, so

JP Gaston:

pre emptive Thank you.

Seth Anderson:

I know, I was telling one in three days. He's like what you mean? like it'd be on the podcast for three days? And like, Yeah, he's like, What?

JP Gaston:

You're gonna, what,

Seth Anderson:

why, why? And the Why is I think increasingly we feel like we can do some good in the world and beyond ourselves beyond our guests, you know, one by one, how can we you know, harness some of the positive energy that we've been building and put it towards a great cause in a

JP Gaston:

cool way to like not just not just go out and do it. charitable event, which I think is fantastic in its own right. But I think we've we've already been talking about being able to do it in some some pretty cool ways that will benefit listeners benefit our guests and make something memorable for everybody. Yeah.

Seth Anderson:

And so we're I think we're just about locked down in terms of which specific charity we'll be working with. And we've got a lot of planning to do to kind of get everything together, thinker to to organize, as it turns out, five seconds of dead air, and we're dead. So

JP Gaston:

I'm pretty sure. I feel like I could talk forever. But at some point, I do like sleep. So I'm sure I will have to

Seth Anderson:

figure that out when we've got some pretty cool people that are interested in helping us out. So people that talk for a living, as well. So I think we'll do it. But it's got some planning to do.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, talk for a living and live for talking, I guess.

Seth Anderson:

Awesome. So thank you. Again, thank you for all the support. And we look forward to staying connected through the next 910 weeks. And we'll have lots of exciting developments on the way and then we'll

JP Gaston:

stay tuned to the social channels, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, kind of Facebook, kind of, kind of, and then LinkedIn and Instagram. Stay Stay tuned to those for sure. And keep checking out our website.

Seth Anderson:

Tick tock, maybe Tick Tock. We'll see. That's another talk all the ticks Thanks, everyone. I know it could be

JP Gaston:

Thanks, everyone.