The Biz Dojo

S3E12 - Creating Space for Well-Being w/Elena Iacono

October 26, 2021 Elena Iacono Season 3 Episode 12
The Biz Dojo
S3E12 - Creating Space for Well-Being w/Elena Iacono
Show Notes Transcript

This week in The Biz Dojo, we're joined by Elena Iacono, a communications and well-being expert, cookbook author, and much (much!) more. 

Elena shares her perspectives on how to create safe spaces for well-being, and we discuss how to lead through challenging conversations about well-being in the workplace. She also shares he perspectives on the global movement towards better understanding of mental health challenges, and how to ensure you're able to connect with and support your friends and family when they need it most.

So, cook up a delicious snack and pour a Biz Dojo Coffee (Masters Medium - OR - Dojo Dark) as we talk through everything from a love of winter to creating space for wellness the next time you're interviewed for new role.

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Seth Anderson:

So I don't know if you know this. But I like sports.

JP Gaston:

But would give it away the multiple jerseys hanging behind you or the most posters on the wall or a couple couple dead giveaways you're wearing right now probably the t shirt you're wearing underneath the sweater you're wearing, right? Yes, there's a good like sport.

Seth Anderson:

The reason I bring this up is I am. I'm in my happy place right now. Because sports is in like full swing. We've got playoff baseball. We've got Monday night football, hockey is back. And my beloved Toronto Raptors are back in action. And I realized that absence makes the heart grow fonder, like this last couple years of like janky seasons and things all over the place. Just like having that fall weather, all the sports where they're supposed to be at the times that they're supposed to be doing the things that they're supposed to be like, we're not having like random NBA Finals in October and stuff like that. It's just like this, like this inner peace that has come from that, that I'm very pleased with. And I forgot that I missed

JP Gaston:

and not just professional sport. Like I'm back to playing hockey again. Which is, man, is that ever good for my brain? Yeah, it's nice to just the first time that I skated back out on the ice. First of all, I thought that I was going to face plan for sure. Like, I haven't stepped on the ice with like full pads and whatever in a very long time. So I was you know, standing at the gate just waiting to get on the ice is like okay, I'm gonna gingerly step out like a Tim that hockey. Now, it makes sure that I stay up. I don't want to Bambi in my first. It's nice. But yeah, like now I'm playing, you know, two, three times a week at the moment. And it feels so much better. And not just when I'm playing but when I'm home thinking about it or just like, relaxed from the experience or, like just means so much to me to be able to be involved in sport, too.

Seth Anderson:

Totally. And same here, you know, getting involved with lindens hockey, he's decided that he wants to give that a go this year. And you know, for years, like I've always loved playing hockey, I love playing hockey when I was younger, especially Paul and hockey with your friends like what's what's better than that. That's, that's like the ultimate. But for years I like it physically hurt me to skate. And largely like not taking care of my body, right? So amazingly, come to find out you lose 100 pounds, you get some core muscles. And all that pain is gone. So now I can actually go out on the ice with my son and his team or, you know, just by myself. And it's an enjoyable experience instead of excruciating pain. And again, it reminds me like why did I go on this wellness journey, and it was for things like this. And now you're like in the moment and it's like, Ah, this is why I did all that work. This is why I went to the gym at 6am. This is why, you know, I stopped eating out every other meal this like all those sacrifices add up to being able to go out onto the arena, and have an enjoyable experience with my son that otherwise I physically could not have done that. But three, five years ago,

JP Gaston:

what for me like it's actually inspiring me to get better, like I'm in a pretty good place, I've actually lost some weight and been taking care of myself physically and mentally more and more. But being back on the ice, like it's making me think about some of the other things that I can work on like flexibility and insurance and all those sorts of things and it's just like, it makes me want to do it. It especially during the pandemic like I would sit on my couch and be like I don't want to do it like the wand is not there but you go out and do it. And it just makes you want to do it more and do it better and improve yourself and I feel like that about a lot of things in life but certainly on the physical side like Once you get going, it's like cleaning for some reason, cleaning my house. Like once I get going, Man, I just want to keep going and make sure everything's in its place and feeling better.

Seth Anderson:

But that's it. You want another life hack, you said flexibility. And that was something I've been big on last year, especially, just because I pulled like every muscle in the lower half of my body. And it was a real challenge. And so I kind of thought, like, I'm gonna have to do like 100 hours of yoga a week to kind of get as flexible as I need to come to find out hitting the hot tub for 10 minutes before you work out. absolute game changer. Yep. absolute game changer. And I assume saunas probably have a similar impact. There's no sauna at my gym. But I've been, as everyone knows, seven or eight weeks now into this fitness program. And I've barely had to stretch. I haven't pulled anything. I've been doing more intense workouts that I've ever done before. And one of the key enablers I'm chalking it up to is that 10 minutes in the hot tub before each workout.

JP Gaston:

I've started, I haven't done that that lack of a hot tub means that I have to wait for water to pour into my tub, which

Seth Anderson:

just lets you get that hot water tank that does the not on demand thing or On Demand. It's on demand,

JP Gaston:

which means it's not ready, which is really another product. But that's a whole separate conversation. Just kidding. But no, I've got the I've got the roller now just I, you know, years ago, I blew my knees playing hockey. And I've got the roller that I just instead of doing all of the stretches and whatnot that people say you need to do, I just roll out my legs to get the stretch of the muscles in. And man does that make a difference? Like I just feel so ready to go when I do that. Now the downside is if I show up late, I end up not doing any stretching or any rolling, which is not good. So I happen to be the guy who's always like an hour early because I never want to be the guy who's laying on the ice and pain because his knees don't work anymore.

Seth Anderson:

I just I'm imagining Jake Taylor and Major League at this point.

JP Gaston:

So I live my life by major league. I also have essence in my locker in the

Seth Anderson:

Joe Do you have Joe boo? Is Joe boo kicking around? Yeah, have hats for bats.

JP Gaston:

People are like, what are they referencing? Go watch Major League.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, yeah, I got, I don't know, Charlie, I got a guy on the other line of votes and white walls, I'll have to get back to you. Anyway, I could do major league all day long. But you know, the reason why we bring this up is you know, today we're gonna talk a lot about personal wellness and how that you know, a, how important it is and be how it affects, you know, the way that we show up at work, the way we show up in our lives, and some practical advice from Elena on her journey and some of the stuff that she's doing in the wellness space.

JP Gaston:

Well, I think too, like we've talked a little bit about, we've got a podcast, but we've also got a coaching practice. And we've built out sort of a methodology behind our coaching and a lot of that centers around all of these different aspects of wellness interacting through some sort of self awareness. And so when you do tackle your physical health, or your mental health, it becomes easier to also tackle some of the other aspects of your life like your environmental wellness or, you know, just working on your mind at the same time as your body. It just it's it's all an enabler. Yeah. And I think we covered that pretty well with Elena.

Seth Anderson:

Yes. So let's let's dive into it. And maybe on the way end of the episode for this week's reflection, what's something you've come to discover maybe in the last couple of months that you missed during the COVID period that you've been able to tap back into? Welcome to The Biz Dojo with Stephan JP. This week, we're joined by Elena Iacono. Elena, welcome to the dojo.

Elena Iacono:

I says Hi, JP, how you doing?

Seth Anderson:

Awesome. Beautiful, beautiful fall day here in Calgary.

Elena Iacono:

I guess. I spent half my day inside cleaning my bathroom. So I will be going outside after this. Second taking the sun. It's so beautiful. It was raining all day yesterday. So it'll be nice to be outside for a bit.

Seth Anderson:

We've had a delightful fall. I would say JP like it was like 20 degrees. Yesterday. I was outside working in the yard all day.

JP Gaston:

We had that one day where it was like snowing a little bit before and I was worried that it was like winter is now here. Enjoy the next seven months of snow real fast. Yeah.

Elena Iacono:

Anyway, what do you like to do? What do you like to do in winter? Like winter jam,

JP Gaston:

warm up. I know I like to like I play hockey so I play far too much hockey and winter and then ski and snowboard and all that sort of stuff. It's funny I

Seth Anderson:

was talking to my son the other day he declared that winter is his favorite season. And then I asked him all of his favorite things about winter. And it was things like hot chocolate, sitting by the fire blankets, and all the things that he does the same. But he's playing hockey this year. So maybe that'll become his new favorite winter activity. We'll see. So, Elena, you know, I didn't really give much of an intro there. How do you? How would you describe who you are and in what you do,

Elena Iacono:

I would describe myself as someone who just loves to see people thrive. And I think that really helps me every day as I work in well being and, and mental health and just doing amazing things every single day with some amazing people to help the people that we work with in our organization keep well, and I think we're approaching that two year mark. And I just think that we've really dug deep to keep well and it's just so inspiring to see all the amazing things people are doing, located here in Toronto, and yeah, just every single day thinking about my contributions to you know, well being and how I can guide people to just stay healthy. So it's it's an incredible journey every single day.

JP Gaston:

We didn't we didn't ask you what what you enjoy about winter now that I now that I know Toronto, cuz I mean, I was automatically thinking West Coast when you said it was raining. Soon as you said that I was like West Coast. But yeah, no, no, I got up in St. Catharines. So I'm interested what, what you do for for fun in winter.

Elena Iacono:

I'm originally from Ottawa, born and raised. And so like skating on the canal for views, just like epic and last winter, last winter, my husband and I, we live on a on a major Provincial Park and we love to go hiking to the trails. And we heard on a Sunday afternoon, one random Sunday, kids, like slap shots. I'm like, don't even tell me. So we discovered this pond. And like, it's our thing we go every weekend and winter. So we're gonna it's gonna be winter to get new skates, and we're just gonna hit the pond every weekend. love it so much. So fun. Awesome. And I think like sets kid sitting by the fire, keep it more, even more otherwise.

JP Gaston:

So here we've got bands where you can skate on the, quote, pond in the middle of the mountains, and you have that mountain backdrop. And then they do have little fire pits set up all around the outside with benches. And they they sell hot chocolate and everything. And I think I spend more time on the bench with a blanket drinking hot chocolate than I do on the ice when I go skating there. But man, is it ever just a beautiful setting to reset yourself? Oh, yeah.

Elena Iacono:

So, so nice. And there's just something so magical about being in nature and skating. But I saw, you know, all the parents who are watching their kids play hockey last winter. So I think I have a business idea. I'm going to set up like a little coffee stand or something. I don't know how I'm going to make this happen. But I want to see like a little bar. And we can like have snacks in the woods. I think that'd be so cool. Let's see what the Provincial Park has to say. But that's my mission this winter.

Seth Anderson:

Oh, no, just maybe tapping into your journey a little bit. How did you get into health and wellness? On the corporate side of things? Like what? How did that journey come together? For you?

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, it's good question. I think about that every single day, just because I love this space so much. And I feel so lucky to be here. My whole backgrounds in communications. And I think over the past almost 20 years of doing that. I always realized that how we connect and the relationships that we you know, set up for ourselves at work really helped drive purpose and makes people feel good. And, you know, I never really realized that there were things behind it like satisfaction, engagement, good mental health at work. But as my career has evolved, I recognize just how vital it is that people are connected to a broader purpose or, you know, respect is shown in every type of relationship or conversation at work. So fast forward a bit, I moved over to our well being team at TELUS. And it's just so fantastic to be working with our director who's leading some amazing work, I love her. Hi, Janet, she's probably gonna listen to this. And just just doing some amazing work and I pivoted over and now I've got this new career and just just loving it so much for the principles that I said that every day, we get to come up with initiatives and drive forward our strategy to keep people well, and we recognize that being well allows you to work with more productivity, sure. But it also creates such an amazing culture where people want to stay. They say great things and they strive and that's just bottom line, what drives me every single day. And some of the things that we do, we've got incredible work, we do a lot of like physical cool well being challenges. But the work that I'm most proud about is the evolution of our mental health strategy and culture that we've created. And we've done things like empowering people to take good training and, you know, learn really the nuggets of good self care, but also being a bridge to support for others. And that like that's cool for me at the end of the day when I see that, you know, says you've had a conversation with a colleague or even you and I are connecting JT will talk for sure. Now now that I know that you're on the team to you know, just how are you helping someone get through the day and I think that's the stuff that keeps me going How much

JP Gaston:

is that changed? You're talking about? It's been two years. I'm imagining that that has changed considerably in the two years.

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, I think the approach where we are hasn't changed. I think if anything, we've just leveled up just because of our organizational commitment to good well being. But what I'm seeing outside of our organization, I mean, we're very progressive, but what I'm seeing outside of our organization is people are starting to think about, yeah, like, what is this concept of well being, it's more than just a yoga class. It's more than just, you know, a fitness schedule, those things are all really important. But I think, where we're seeing really good thought leadership, and I was just reading a piece from Deloitte this morning, where we're seeing some really good thought leadership is okay. The social contract between an employer and employee has really changed. People want great flexibility, they want to work for a place that is taking care of them. And they want to have legitimate healthy workplace relationships. That's mental health at work, you know, when we're able to connect and work well and strive for excellence. But our mental health is intact. I mean, what else? What else do we want? And I think leaders are really starting to see just how important every single word that they save with their colleagues and employees, how that impacts someone. And I mean, works, work, work is always going to be here. But I think how we're thinking about how we're doing work is changing. And where we do work is changing. So I think all of those things do affect well being. When we're at work, will we ever solve people's personal well being concerns or issues or challenges? No. But we can be a really strong bridge to supportive care. And I think that feeds into broader social responsibility. And I'm seeing a lot of companies doing that. I mean, where we are. We're just doing some amazing things. So yeah, I've seen I've seen I've seen a significant shift, and slowly but surely, other organizations are thinking about what they can do to keep their employees

JP Gaston:

well as well. I do a lot of work with well being but not being in it fully immersed every day. I don't, I don't I see, you know, the calm app, and those sorts of things are starting to get, you know, more and more recognized. Are there a lot of advancements on the technology side when it comes to enabling mental health, physical wellbeing,

Elena Iacono:

I think so that there's a plethora of technology that's available from Viet virtual care, or, you know, mindful meditation, or I love even just seeing the communities that are being built, you know, just using social media, and everybody is playing such an amazing part in creating a bit of hope and optimism for each other and for themselves. Things like, you know, going live on Instagram, and Seth introduced me to clubhouse which never really took off for me. I don't know, I like seeing people.

JP Gaston:

either. He was very excited about it for like, and then I stopped hearing about it. So I knew it was no longer

Seth Anderson:

you know, what actually killed it for me, I think was the nonstop notification notifications about that I didn't care about and I just,

Elena Iacono:

yeah, well, I remember. It was like a random Saturday, we had a quick call. And I was like, in the middle of making wild boar, I love to cook by the way. And you're like you have to try Clubhouse. I'm like, okay, so I tried it. And then I joined some conversation of some people up in Ibiza, and they were talking about, I don't even know what they're talking about. So I like translated the little sentence on like, get this. But this doesn't even make any sense. Like who? Anyway,

Seth Anderson:

I see now that Twitter is actually trying some kind of version of that, though. Have you seen that? Recently, they have like, at the top of their app, they have this like, conversation thing you can join because they tried basically doing the the Instagram story thing and that failed. So I think they've kind of they've got some kind of clubhouse CPL going now. But anyway, yeah. Didn't. Didn't take off. For me that

Elena Iacono:

didn't take off. But but you know, it's a nice attempt of creating a community. And I'm sure it's super popular Adam grants on and what have you. So yeah, I mean, it's just going back to the concept of JP, back to your question, like, just that sense of community. And there's great technology, there's great initiative. And I think there's a lot of empowerment. And I think people have, like totally rewritten their own values, we've had to face some really tough situations. I myself, in my own personal life has had to say goodbye to a very toxic friendship that plagued me for a long time. And it just really helped me reevaluate what matters. And I think a lot of people are there. And it's just so fantastic to see this sense of enlightenment. Yeah, so it's pretty cool. Pretty cool space to be in, right? I mean, well, beings,

JP Gaston:

not new. But it feels very new. Like it's only been the last three to five years where it's really started to be a focus for organizations. And that's really when it starts to become more of a thing. I'm sure in three to five years, it'll just be the, you know, another thing that's happening in the background all the time, and everyone will think oh, we've always had well being we've done it since the dawn of time. But no, it'll only be 10 years old at that point.

Elena Iacono:

Well, I hope so. And I think but I think that I think that there will be some people in some places that are saying okay, yeah, no, we have been doing this and well Like, think of it, like what I'm going to answer your question, but what is well being mean to you what, like, tell me what that means to you in it in a workplace perspective, from a workplace perspective,

JP Gaston:

if I can bring myself if I can be myself and bring myself and I can leave feeling like myself and like, I can go do the things I love to do at home, then I'm feeling pretty good. Like that's, I mean, I applied to the job as me, I got hired as me, let me be me at work. And let me let me do things that make me feel productive, and like, I'm a part of a community at work, but also let me be able to go home and disconnect from work and feel like I'm living a life doing more than just working.

Elena Iacono:

Yes, if you want to, that's amazing.

Seth Anderson:

I mean, I have a lot of thoughts on this. And I think it's not that I disagree with the concept of work life balance, I understand the sentiment, and it makes sense. But for me, I have found my my wellness, my overall human wellness has improved, the less I've thought about work life balance, and the more I've just thought about finding balance within myself. And what this sort of COVID period has provided me is the, you know, the ability to slow down and have some time and space to figure out what that is. And for me, whether the the task that I am doing is something related to my day job, or the podcast, or parenting, or, you know, just taking care of myself. I think what good looks like is when you can find a flow between all those things, and it doesn't feel like you're constantly like starting and stopping and having to kind of get yourself amped up to do something you're just kind of in like a flow state of life where things come at you and you and you just process of and you deal with them the best you can, at least for me, that's what I've found to be wellness. And I haven't necessarily described it. I don't know if that all connected. But that's, that's that's what comes to mind for me.

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, I think and I think that's, that's bang on, like each of you have your own perception of what well being is. And that's the whole point, you know, it's personal, it's unique to you. And I agree with both of you. And just for me well being means, you know, I'm I'm, I have a really broad sense of meaning. And yes, it's being physically fit. And it's about being, you know, doing my fundraising and all my fun stuff I love to do, but it's just for me, I thrive when I know I have meaning. And then I'm like constantly learning. That's when I'm at my best. And so just JP to answer your question. I think there's a lot of places that have inadvertently been addressing this through a really amazing cultural experience for their team members. But I think you're right, the concept while being is, is trendy, but it's, it's it's here to stay. And I think how you think about enabling everything you said, Seth, and all the things you said JP, you know, empowering people to bring their whole selves and being their whole selves, I think that's going to be where more organizations are focusing on. And so wellbeing has always well being has been around since Aristotle. And this is such an abstract concept. But I think what's so amazing is organizations really realizing that, yeah, I have to really make sure that I'm not only understanding who my team members are and the employees I bring in, but what do they need to keep thriving and working in flow and feeling mentally safe and all that? So that's, you know, it's again, I feel so privileged to be able to play a part in this in this realm. It's really cool.

Seth Anderson:

When you touched on right at the end there that piqued my interest is the concept of creating safe spaces. And I think that is increasingly important. In the workplace, it is probably important everywhere, but what advancements have you seen on that front? And do you have any, like, I guess, tips or tricks for folks, when it comes to creating those safe spaces that work because there's a fine line between, you know, creating a safe space, and then you know, creating maybe, inadvertently, like a therapy session or things that can go a direction that maybe you're not qualified or prepared to handle for what what kind of guidance you have on that front?

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, and I love I love I love that you're asking that question. And hopefully your audience takes something away from this, but I think so two things. One, I think we all play a role, we all play a role, whether or not we're in a senior, you know, leadership role, or, you know, single contributor type team member, we all play a role in creating a safe space and even you know, think that all of this translates to our personal lives to with our friends or family. And so I think, number one, just being non judgmental, and just being someone who fosters trust in every single day, and who is stands for trust, confidentiality, and it's just, you know, humble humbleness every single day. And I think what I mean by that is, you know, if I'm having a conversation with a colleague, I, I, I'm committed to having great workplace relationships. If I can see that maybe she or he is off, you know, just take it offline and just have a personal conversation and just be like, Look, I'm here for you, you don't have to tell me anything. But, you know, here all of our mental health resources that are available, or let's grab a virtual coffee or chat. But I think what I what I'm seeing is significant investments in leadership training, team member training. This is just in general, I'm not speaking where we work, Seth, but just in general. And I'm also seeing just a commitment of people just going easy on on themselves and each other. So I hope I'm answering your answering your question, but those are some of the things I think we can all we can all do. You know, and if someone comes to us, you know, just the whole basic element of, you know, thanking them for coming to us, and just telling them that it's a safe space. And I think, I know I said, I see you do this with your team, you know, you you create a space where there's, you know, it's vulnerable, it's confidential, and you and your team are having amazing conversations. So you know, kudos to you on that. It just gives people permission. And I think it gives yourself permission to also set the right tone, one of

Seth Anderson:

the things I've been wrestling with a lot, and one of the points you made, there was around judgment. And JP and I talked a lot over the last year or so on the pod, at various points about I would say judgment, as well as biases and how those sort of can surface and come out either in the workplace, personal life, whatever. But I have found if you can really like slow yourself down and realize when you're coming from a place of judgment, or when you have a bias that's surface and, and sort of become aware of that and set it to the side and think, Hey, what is it like on coming from that person shoes? Or how do I come from a place of compassion instead of bias or judgment? As a leader? You know, to me, that's the best starting place is being able to recognize those because we all have them, we're all, you know, conditioned to have them I think, just in the world we've grown up with, and if you can get past that, and just start to see people for who they are and meet them there, wherever they might be. I think that's the starting point of creating some of those spaces that you talked about.

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, I think and I'm just put aside your own ego and put aside your notion of you know, I know everything or whatnot. But like I'm being I've personally been tested with this concept that you just said, but yeah, you're right, we have to just put aside our ego, and we have to just think about what someone's really going through. So yeah, keep keep doing that. Because you're an inspiration to me,

JP Gaston:

like I've said, and I talk about bias all the time, in part, because I'm just like, so interested in bias. Rapson articles. Yes, that's totally my jam. But I think people don't realize, like, every single thought you have, every single decision you make, everything you do in life has a bias of some sort, you have been informed from somewhere to think the way you think about a topic. And that could be from great experiences that you that you've had, and it could be a really well informed bias, that could be the right thing to do. And your brain clicks, and it does the thing, and it does it quickly. And you don't even have to think about it, it's perfect. But for some people, like you were saying, they may be come up in a different environment, they maybe have people around them who struggled in the past with certain things, and they form a different bias. And especially when it's a really well informed, it's really hard to set that to the side and say, Okay, I am here to listen and understand you. And I'm going to take the time to really get to the root of this so that we can work through it together.

Elena Iacono:

It's hard. I mean, where do you even start? Where do you even start, and you just have to park all of that. And I think that's, that's that's the compassion that I think we need to keep bringing to our environment and our spaces and our friendships and everything else that we do, you know, and that just creates a stronger sense of belonging and a stronger sense of support. I think that's something that's missing. And that, you know, that that that really does end up fueling everyone's well being because you've created a space that's non judgmental. You know, I actually really enjoy having those those, those tough conversations, because I leave always learning something, though, I think it's a matter of, you know, the right decorum, just having those discussions. But yeah, good, good. I agree with what we both just said,

JP Gaston:

Do you think there's an element in the hiring process when it comes to well being like, I know, we need to create the space when people are here. But is there something that we should be doing in the hiring process to make sure that the people coming on under like, we always talk about culture as a part of the hiring process? And I know well being part of culture. So of course, there's that aspect, but is there something specific about well being that should be within that hiring process?

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, I mean, like anything when you're in an interview process, and you're exploring the candidate, and the candidate is exploiting you, as a leader or an organization. It just I, I'm really, I mean, I haven't had an interview in over like, five years. But I mean, some some of the experiences that people have told me are, you know, I'm being asked what I like to do in terms of my community work or my community involvement. You know, what would you do? If you found yourself in a situation where someone was experiencing a mental health concern? What would you do? And I think those questions are super important if you're hiring someone in a leadership role, but also in a, you know, single contributor, team member role, you know, you want to be able to make sure that the culture that you're creating, from a well being perspective includes people that are willing and do look out for each other. And I think, you know, other questions that could be that can be tapped into are things about just general humanistic type questions, what do you love to read? What drives you? What? What have you so those are the type of questions that really indicate someone's total being. And I think that that's the concept is just seeing someone as an entire whole person with interests outside of work, and you're giving permission for that person to not change. And I think that's so so important that that's well being in an eye for me, like, I, if I was going through that type of process, I would want to know, and I hope that people who are going through interview processes are empowered to keep at all of their, you know, personal passions, because that's important. It makes us who we are from a total rounded perspective,

Seth Anderson:

interesting topic. interviews have always been a challenge for me, it's not, not my se Fe is not something I like to do. And I think part of that has been, I've always thought about interviews as a one way process, where the person's person or persons on the other side of the table, or zoom, if you will, whatever the situation is, they're judging my qualifications, my answers my everything in determining whether they, you know, they're going to pick me for this job, but and I'm like you, I haven't had a an interview in a while. But when I think of it now, student interview, like an interview is really a two party process, like, and I think if you had into it with that mindset, like you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you, in terms of role fit, and, you know, your qualifications and experiences. That's, that's got to be a much better way. I think the next interview I have, I have to go into it with that mindset, because it is actually a totally different mindset than going into it and placing all the expectations on what the other person judges you to be.

Elena Iacono:

I agree. And there's someone, someone in my life who has such a laser sharp focus on this. And when they prepare for these types of situations. Yeah, they prepare and anticipate for the questions that they'll be asked, but they grill the employer and I just like I've just marked been, I've marveled at the confidence behind that. But it's just so important. Like, this is where you're going to be spending, like, how much time do we spend working, we need to make sure that it's just as good for us as it is for them. And I think it's so important. And if you have to think of it as a conversation, like you said, Yes, of course, is we're in but you know, it's a business meeting. It has to be professional, but I think it has to be as natural as possible. So I think for anyone who's going to an interview this week, or whenever you're listening to this podcast, don't be don't worry about not, you know, asking a question that is really important to you. I think if anything it makes it bodes well on you. So, go for it

JP Gaston:

well, and to your point, like you spend a good chunk of your life working and not just like, people think you spend time working from eight to four, because that's your schedule, but your brain is still at work. When you come home, you're still thinking about that present, like you're still fundamentally you are still at work, you might not be in PowerPoint, or Excel doing something, but you are at work mentally. And I think that's the work we need to do, right. Like in the in the mental wellness space.

Elena Iacono:

I've been doing so much research and reading on like this whole concept of the future of work. And it's just these big phrases, but like, what does that even mean? And so from a well being perspective, I think, I think what we need to keep thinking about is who are the people that we're who are the people that are joining an organization or who are working there? What type of work are they doing? And what are they prepared to keep doing? And what do they want to stop? And that's and how do you approach that thinking through a well being lens. And so you're right, you know, you we need to make sure that we're either joining organizations that completely aligned with everything that we stand for. And then we're hiring people and bringing people on board who are just as passionate about our own, you know, the organizational purposes. So, addressing well being in an interview, I think people are doing it, I don't know if they actually realized that it is well being and it's just so great to see people moving beyond just thinking about the physical fitness component of well, wellness and wellbeing, but it's it's just it has to tap into concepts that bring to life the whole person

JP Gaston:

to good point to on the others. I didn't think about that until you just said it. If you're sitting in an interview, and you have these questions that aren't being answered, if you get hired, and you don't ask them and you don't get the answer, you're going to be surrounded by a bunch of people who also didn't have or didn't care about these questions that were very important to you. And that's, there's a good chance that's not going to be a good cultural fit for you.

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, yeah. And I think and I think like, we're seeing it in Gen. What comes after millennials, Gen. Zed, right? And then does it go back to Gen eight, like, I feel like it's going back to the starters.

JP Gaston:

Like Gen a Gen.

Seth Anderson:

What was DNA? Like? Is that a thing? When did they start with this generation thing?

Elena Iacono:

I don't know. But I feel like after Gen. Zed, it's like going back. I honestly, I was laughing about it a few weeks ago. I'm like, what? That doesn't make any sense. But anyway, the the next next gen of talent, I think, I think about my niece, she's like 17, and she is so committed to health and well being and, you know, making sure that her mental health is supported, and rightly so. So I think about her entering the workforce in the next I don't know, she's actually starting university in September, or I think she's deciding which her plans are, anyway, we know that people are going to continue to make Well being a priority. And so I have a point, I promise, it goes back to JP, what you were just saying, asking the questions, but also from an employer brand perspective. I think organizations need to keep attracting and leveraging their competitive advantage of well being and, you know, you're in an interview, and you should be asking the potential leader, you know, what are your mental health support? What, what happens if I need time off? You know, what are we doing to support good mental health for everybody, and so on. So I think just back to your point, JP, those are important questions to ask. Thanks for making me think of that, because I'm going to think about that now, all week.

Seth Anderson:

I was thinking, you know, because I think a lot of times people associate the term mental wellness with, like, you've made a couple of statements already, like yoga and physical fitness, and meditating. And some of those, some of those things, which are components, you know, can can be tools that you can use to promote good mental

Elena Iacono:

health, very important, and I don't want people I like, I don't want people to think that I think that that's not important. Those are critical. Like those are, those are what, you know, for some people that fills their cup, and you know, good on you. Keep going.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah. And so for me, I feel like mental health is a constant journey, like, it is not something where, you know, you put in a bunch of work for three months, and then you're, you're cured. Like, all of a sudden, you have great mental health, like it is, it is a grind, it is a journey, there's going to be ups, there's going to be downs. And to me, it's having as many habits, tools, resources, coping mechanisms, available to yourself, so that when those situations occur, you can deal with them quickly and efficiently, without spiraling into a bad habit, or negativity or what have you. And, like, I think that that's the thing like mental health isn't, is an ongoing process forever and ever and ever. And there's not really a destination, I don't think

Elena Iacono:

it is an ongoing journey. I mean, think of it, our heart keeps ticking, we have to make sure every single day our cardiovascular health is manageable and managed properly. So this way, we don't end up dropping to the floor, you know, and it's I mean that in all seriousness, we have to, we have to keep thinking about our mental health and our total well being, like we do our physical health and all that important stuff. And yes, so many right tools, so many great resources, supportive conversations, discussions like this. I mean, like, look at what you guys are doing, you're fostering a community here. And hopefully, this helps someone down the line. But I also think, when you work for a company that makes it a priority to do this, and I'm not just saying like, you know, having a campaign here or there, or just benefits, like a company that really prides itself on doing this. I mean, wow, like, that's, it's it's so powerful. It gives me goosebumps. And that's why I feel so fortunate to be a part of that. But yeah, no, I think it's so vital. And I think organizations that recognize this are going to be in it for the long run. Right. And I think team members are team members want to be engaged in, you know, great career development and great learning opportunities. But I know that when my boss helps me take care of my mental health, geez, like, we just had a conversation just recently about, you know, purpose and meaning and learning. And it was the safest conversation I've had ever and it was so tough because I was really thinking about, you know, big ideas, but she made it a safe space and that's what matters. That's what matters. Well,

JP Gaston:

I think like physical health, mental health is it's tough to start. Once you get the cycle going, your feet will keep pumping, you'll you'll keep rolling, but it can be difficult to get in like the first time you have one of those conversations or the first time you open up to a friend or a family member that you To trust or anything like that, to have a real conversation about mental health, it's not easy. It's not

Elena Iacono:

easy, because first off, the person who is sharing is obviously worried about judgment or stigma or fear of maybe having someone hold that over their head. But also, you know, trust. But hopefully, people have trusting friendships and relationships at work. But it's also it's not it's not easy on either the person in this situation, because then the person who's on the receiving end may not know what to say. Or maybe they'll just be so nervous and just start talking about themselves when all you need to say is listen, thanks for coming to me, and then just zip it, let the person talk. But what I want to see is more people becoming self interested in learning about mental health resources, like we're we were thinking, what's that new show on Netflix? I can't even watch it. What's it called?

JP Gaston:

Speed games?

Elena Iacono:

Yeah. So watch it. I hope you love that show. I'll never watch it. But then once you're done and you're making dinner, think about you know, what, what if someone was going to come to me this week with a tough conversation, what do you really know where to even guide them? You know, there's so much out there, Canadian Mental Health Association, the Mental Health Commission of Canada, there's so many free resources that we can just keep proactively educating ourselves on and let's just all commit to being a good ally and a good bridge to support so I'm not saying don't watch Netflix, because when we're done this, I've got to keep plowing through Seinfeld's finally on Netflix. But just, you know, stand up and just commit to being a socially responsible friend, who's going to be there, you know, if someone's choking, what do you do just wait for the ambulance to show up. Hopefully, you're trained in CPR, and you offer some support. I, I do believe in a day where we have all gone through Mental Health First Aid training, which is offered by the Mental Health Commission of Canada, they did not pay me to say that I'm just joking. I just really love that organization. And just go get, you know, just figure out what you can do to support those in your life.

Seth Anderson:

It's really interesting one, because often, people don't ask for help. How do you like, I guess through your learning through that? Does it give you any tips or pointers or insights on how to spot someone who may be going through something that, you know, they're not upfront about it or not saying, hey, I need something but you you know, something like, how do you navigate some of those situations where you know, something is up with someone, but they're not talking about it? Yeah, and then you kind of got to straddle that line of being a leader, and then being too intrusive. Like, there's a lot going on there. Wondering if you have any insight on that.

Elena Iacono:

Yeah. Like you're talking more from a workplace perspective. Yeah, it's hard. I mean, it's hard also, because we're still we're still virtual, and who knows when things will go back to, you know, I hate the word normal, because like, it's been two years, like, this is two years of time has gone. So we're not going back to the way it was we you know, that's, that's the past. But I think, you know, hopefully, if you're a leader, you know, you know, what, you know, gets your team members going, and if someone becomes withdrawn, or, you know, you see, you see something maybe slipping in their work, that's just so unlikely of them and unusual event, like, just take note of it. But I mean, if I was in that situation, I would obviously, take note of it. But then if it was like a week or two that elapsed, and the person is either late for meetings, or just seems off, I would, I would just book a virtual coffee and just be like, listen, hey, how are you? You know, let's just have it, let's just have a conversation. And if the person's in a tough spot, and you do that, and you reach out, I don't know how they'll react, but I just feel like you're kind of throwing out a lifeline. What do you think?

Seth Anderson:

I mean, if I'm picking up what you're putting down, you know, trust your intuition. And, you know, yeah, there are ways to engage with someone that it's not like, hey, there's obviously something wrong with you tell me about it. It's more of a Hey, what's up? How you doing? Yeah.

Elena Iacono:

Intuition. Yeah. And I think and that's like, that's why that's why I'm just so it's exciting for me to see that more leaders just in general, and you know, across all industries and across the country are really asking themselves. Jeez, like, am I am I displaying humanistic leadership traits where I'm either guided by intuition, or I know my team well enough to see that maybe they're off. So yeah, it's it. But see, that's the thing we try to come up with this model of like, what do we do? Just Just think about? Think about the basics, right, those basic relationship skills of intuition or non judgmental listening. So I think those are the things we just have to keep tapping into the answers are within us. I feel like sometimes when we think of this mental health at work, it's over complicated. I think if we just kind of dialed it back, we would we have the answers within us in terms of how we should be responding. And yeah, what we should be doing to support.

JP Gaston:

Whenever I had a team member like that, I would think what what do I need? If I'm in that situation? What do I need whatever is happening to them? What like, how would I want someone to respond and not how would I want a leader to respond? Because I think instantly everyone assumes that they don't want their leader involved in their life. But how would I Want another human to respond to me or to reach out to me to have a conversation? And when I walk myself through that, it always comes back to I would be okay with my leader coming to me just to have a conversation to say something like, Hey, you don't quite seem like yourself lately. Let's let's just chat. Is there something happening at work? Is there something I can support you in? Is there you know, any way that I can offer you some supports? Or you because like, it could be work related, it could be home related, it could be any number of things, and just opening up for the conversation is so important. Yeah. No,

Elena Iacono:

JP, you raise a really good point. And so I agree with everything you just said. But there may be some instances where people don't have great relationships with their leaders, let's face it, this, this is the reality for many people, they just go to work, do their thing. And, you know, it's just strictly professional and business. But here's what a leader can do, if they may not have a great relationship, and a great relation, let me take that, let me take that back. And, you know, an open relationship with an employee, let's say, I think it's the leaders responsibility to just make sure always to be talking set the right tone, you know, set the right tone, make sure that you're highlighting all the resources that are available, share anecdotes, continuously demonstrate that you're creating a safe space. So this way, number one, an employee the team is always listening, the team is always looking for the cues from the leader that either makes Make, make the point that they're they're supporting the resources, and they know they're communicating about resources or that should someone ever have a problem, they can go to the leader. So I think it's it's, it's on the it's the leaders accountability to make sure that they're constantly talking about it. And and I'm seeing people do this, I'm seeing so many people take it upon themselves to educate themselves on what their company offers them. So this way, if an employee does come to them, they know what to do.

Seth Anderson:

One of the things that we've talked about quite a bit over the last couple of years, and I know you came in did a little bit of a presentation with my team about it a couple of times now was around seasonal affective disorder, and just kind of wanted to pick your brain on that a little bit, just given the time of year, we are in the throes of fall days are getting shorter weather's getting colder, you know, that does have a real human impact a lot of people, and I know this is an area, you've done quite a bit of research, and you've spoken about this. What is bad? And how can, how can people learn more about how it may be impacting them and what they could do about it?

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, seasonal affective disorder is a type of depression. And psychologist and clinical psychologist think of SAD, seasonal affective disorder as a type of depression that settles in when, you know, the colder months come in. And the third Monday of January is considered Blue Monday. And it's a time where people are at their lowest point. And it's I think it's mythical because it's, you know, coming out of the Christmas holiday season, if you don't celebrate Christmas, it is a time of, you know, gathering with friends and family, and then you're in the throes of winter. If you're in Canada, we're so far from the equator. So that creates limited amount of light, and so on, like you said, so but I think seasonal affective disorder can hit I said anytime. It could, it could, it really is driven by this notion of either a reduced rude, or either you're eating a lot or you're not eating enough, you're super sleepy, you've lost your passion and your motivation, and your drive and even just your overall excitement for the things that you you know, typically love. And it can it seasonal affective disorder can hit us at any time. And you're right, you know, we're gearing up for another long winter as Canadians, what can we do about it. And so things like just making sure like the back goes back to the start of this discussion, thinking of the things that help us fill up our cup, you know, what really is needed in our self care plans, or our approaches what feels what feels our day. And I think it, you can also bring in some light therapy, I'm not a doctor. So I'm not going to say go take vitamin D if maybe your body can't take that as a vitamin, but you know, have a good discussion with your doctor and by myself ramp up my own vitamin D levels just helps me focus and stay good. But I think it can affect us at any time sad, and it's just doesn't just come to us in the winter months.

JP Gaston:

I have a couple of close friends who actually are impacted by sad and it was really rough understanding how to communicate with them over that time like sometimes they wanted to talk sometimes they completely disconnect I mean, it is absolutely a form of depression. So all of those things that you see with an any other type of depression you see with it? Is there any sort of tip or trick or advice you would give to somebody who has someone in their life who is impacted by sad?

Elena Iacono:

I think there's a few things that you can do and I think the first thing is just recognize I don't take it personally. And that happened to me personally one time where I thought, What did I do? Turns out it was the person just going through a tough time. So I would say, you know, just just reach out. And even if the person doesn't text you back, they see that that text is coming through, and just offer your support. And when the person's ready, they'll reach out. But just try not to abandon that person, because just that random text or that random, funny article that you send them or whatever it is, just let them know that you're thinking of them. And again, these are just really basic things. But I think thing that happens first is oh, man, we feel so bad at what I do. We, you know, we typically, it's just, it's not about us, it's about that person. And we just need to remember to be compassionate.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, I know, for for one of my friends who experienced it. And he's a musician, and he's very big on the going out and seeing bands and whatever. And but in winter just shuts down, it doesn't want to leave the house doesn't want to go anywhere, do anything. And I know that a lot of his close friends, because we've now had conversations about it, because we are very open with each other about it. And it's a great relationship. But he has mentioned in the past that, you know, some of his friends will just keep hounding him to go out. And they don't understand that. Yeah, I told you yesterday, I wasn't going I told you today I wasn't going and you're actually not helping the situation by asking a third time. Whether or not I'm going like be be there be supportive invite me for sure. I appreciate that. But, you know, don't try and force me to do things because you think that that's a that's a cure for my effectiveness disorder?

Elena Iacono:

Yeah. Do you feel that that stigma is slowly starting to evaporate? Or do you feel just in general, in Canada, we have more work to do, like, just, instead of, cuz in that type of situation, you know, I can see how the person asking would be like, Oh, come on, just suck it up. Let's go. You know, what the heck's no problem? I've asked you so many times. But I'm gonna ask you the question like, do you feel like we're becoming a little bit more understanding and compassionate?

JP Gaston:

I would say, in general, I think we are, I will caveat that by saying, I am also surrounded now by people, because I've done a lot of work on my own mental health and surrounding me with people. Like I think a lot of the people around me probably do a lot more work in that space. And the in there certainly a lot of folks out there who still don't understand it. Still don't do any work on mental health or don't appreciate mental health disorders, like I certainly see it. When I do things like play hockey, I'm a goalie. So I sometimes skill on failing on teams that I'm not regularly a part of, and just in the conversations that happened in the room, you can see those sorts of things. haven't advanced the way that you would hope they would across society, but maybe within your own circles. But I do think that they've advanced, like for sure, I think there's there's been a lot of advancement there. I can tell that in this maybe sad indicator of society. But I can tell that because I can see the commercials on TV, I can hear the commercials and radio, once it starts to permeate the media, I think it's there has been advancement, and there will continue to be Yeah, and

Elena Iacono:

there's a lot that we you know, just, there's a lot that we don't know about mental health disorders and illnesses. So that's why like, I really do invite everyone to check out the Mental Health First Aid training. It's like a nominal amount, it's $200, I think, to take the training, and you learn about the different types of mental illness. And I think we've just as a society, we don't know where to start. And I feel like there's just like, I think we're just so scared by opening the door on mental health illness, because we don't know how to talk about it. And for some, it is a really scary, like schizophrenia, schizophrenia is very scary, and for the person who's the person who's living with it, but also the family members, too. And friends. So I think it's just really important that we educate ourselves. We're aware of the different types of conditions that exist, like we would diabetes, or heart conditions or whatever. And just think of it like we would any other type of illness that people encounter

JP Gaston:

is a physical illness. Because I think those are the ones people, people understand them, right. Like, I think specifically about something you're just saying, like heart disease, like there has been a ton of advancement. And now there's all these different types of heart disease. And everyone appreciates that there are all these different types of heart disease. But on the autism spectrum, the autism spectrum has changed considerably with the research in the last several years. But people don't appreciate that in the same way that they do physical illnesses and physical issues that people might face. So I think in the mental wellness basic, you're already a little bit behind the eight ball because people struggle, you know, it's not they don't see a broken arm. They don't see any sort of physical impairment. They just hear that you have some sort of thing that you're struggling through. And it's hard for them to appreciate that there's a wide range of things that could be going on. And some of them are really impactful. And some of them are just on the surface. And you can't see them. You probably don't know about them, but to that person. They are dragging them down.

Elena Iacono:

They're very real. They're very real. Yeah, I agree.

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Erin Evans:

Hello, this is Erin Evans from the Erin Evans podcast. And you are listening The Biz Dojo

Seth Anderson:

during COVID I know you had a challenging situation with your your grandma passing away and you ended up doing something very inspirational out of that. And so for this week's question was mama SAS. So we have a weekly segment where my mom asked the question of the guests and I love this. Yeah, I'd center you know a couple of things about you and and so she this is what she came up with. So my my Nana's cooking was a huge inspiration for me. And her recipes have become family or treasured family keepsakes, she actually took like a handwritten, probably handwritten recipes and laser them on the cutting boards and stuff that's very impactful to her. It's important to me to preserve them, and share them with my family by you know, lasering them on to items and whatnot. Wondering if you have found as you've gone back and looked at all the old recipes, if there were some commonly used ingredients that are now obsolete, because in our Nana's cooking, there was things calling for a can of lard or grease that was kept under the sink and some some things like that. So just wondering if you kind of came across any interesting ingredients when you were going through that process?

Elena Iacono:

That's such a good question. Not really. So my grandmother actually, that's the beauty I'm going to send you both works that you already have it but um, when did you send your mom the link to the book? Please give her a copy of the PDF?

Seth Anderson:

I did not. But I will. Yes.

Elena Iacono:

Okay. And to anybody who's listening, if you want it, let me know, I'll send it to you. So basically, here's what we did. So we raised $60,000. For food banks, Canada in three months, I replicated all my grandmother's recipes, gave every dollar to food banks and such amazing work that that translated to about 300,000 net new meals, which is incredible. And my grandmother didn't write down the recipes, I replicated them and I replicated them by memory because the ingredients were so simple. I mean Italian Italian cooking is it's the best Italian food is the most simple. So things like when you make your own pasta, you kind of make sure you've got the right flour and the right best organic yellow eggs. Actually, the best eggs are usually really nice and orange, rosemary, I mean, jeez, every time I think of my grandmother, or I smell rosemary, now I think of her. So I don't know if anything's become obsolete. But I think what's becoming obsolete is the way we're preparing things and the dishes and just you know, doing it with our families and you know, really making time on Sunday which by the way, I have a pot of sauce on the oven stove right now. Just really making time for the enjoyment of food and preparing things and it doesn't have to be you don't have to be Italian to do this. It can be any culture which is so amazing. And just making the mindful time to try your hand. So I think yes, the pandemic has helped re inspire this and I hope that people stay with these behaviors of cultivating good food practices at home. So it wasn't an ingredient that's become obsolete but I think a way of preparing food has changed.

JP Gaston:

I I love cooking love do you use

Seth Anderson:

grease under your sink for anything?

JP Gaston:

Yes my my under my under sink grease use regularly.

Elena Iacono:

What do you do with that? Like Apparently you're supposed to save green

Seth Anderson:

used to be a thing I don't I don't I don't know.

JP Gaston:

I don't know what what's really good is if you'd like so if you're like making a soup or something. Oh the all the fat comes up to the top right like we I just made a bunch of turkey soup after I rotisserie my turkey. Um, so I had this like super flavorful soup after, and all the fat rises to the top and you can scoop that fat off. And then you can use that fat to cook something else and it adds the flavor to the next thing that you cook. Now, I don't know how sanitary is just under the sink for, you know, weeks on end and be like, hey, now it's time let's go.

Elena Iacono:

I never know what to do with that oil. I just like I put it in a in a I don't dump it down the drain because you're not supposed to do that. But I never know what to do with it. So I'll call you.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, no, it's really it's really good to cook with. Like, if you can use it within a day or two. I actually put mine in the fridge and I just let it harden and then I throw it in the pan and it's just like butter just melts and then you just cook whatever in it and it adds that flavor to it. But it does also mean that for a few days we like everything we ate tasted a little bit like the turkey that we had a son

Elena Iacono:

meal that keeps on going. Yeah, exactly.

Seth Anderson:

Like it's very quickly evolved into just like a foodie podcast, but you get Jordan west on the line. And

JP Gaston:

yeah, let's do it. 100%

Elena Iacono:

I listen, I'll come and talk about I love food. I love cooking. I love eating. But just quickly, I made a carbonara with one jolly, which is like peak. Pink Cheeks. I save the oil that the guanciale Friday I like it because it emits so much. And then I cook the pasta in it. Oh my God, it was so good. Not good for the arteries. But it was good for you. It's good for myself.

JP Gaston:

It's very good for the amount of saliva in my mouth right now to because now I'm getting, I mean, very hungry.

Seth Anderson:

I guess just on the way out of here, I know you got to pass on the stove, and you need to get a fresh coffee. And yeah. What are you working on? Personally, from a development standpoint? And how are you feeding your mind?

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, great question. I love to read what what what I have been gravitating towards is reconciliation. And just really understanding what that means. And I have to say, I used the day, not going to call it a holiday because by no means that's not what it is. Commemorative day, I use that day to read Bob Josef's 21 things you may not know about the Indian Act, it has changed my life. And I have to say I was embarrassed and ashamed that at almost 40 years old, I was only learning about this now is because I went to a Catholic school. I don't know, I'm not going to blame it on religion. But it's just blew me away with respect to what has happened, but continues to happen to people. And so indigenous peoples rather in Canada. So just that's something that I've been personally committing myself to and just really understanding what reconciliation really means. You know, how do I become an ally? And how do I keep learning more about things that are so significant from a cultural perspective, and that we have to make sure that the Indigenous People's Voice continues to be carried on there. They're a fundamental part of our of our culture and our history. And it's something that I'm just committing to

JP Gaston:

have you taken the course from you have a the indigenous candidate course.

Elena Iacono:

No, but it's on my list. It's on my Can you have you taken it?

JP Gaston:

Yes, yes, it is really, really good.

Elena Iacono:

This is what I'm reading right now. It's Jodie Wilson Raybould. From where I stand, if you can see it. It's amazing. And yeah, so I'm just trying to just understand this. And I can't like again, I'm not only am I embarrassed, but I'm very angry that we weren't taught what actually happened when we were younger. And I think as adults, we we need to commit to learning. I

JP Gaston:

think it was about the second week into that course. It's separated by week, I think I did the first week in like a day because it was just so good. And then when I was doing the second week material about halfway through, I just had to pause it and walk away from my computer, and really think about like, what have I been taught in life? And why was this missing?

Elena Iacono:

Yeah, yeah, I understand what you're saying. Because I was I this is the what I was reading 21 things you may not know about the Indian Act on on the day, I had to I read the whole thing. I just sat and I committed myself to the whole day, but I had to stop at one point, put it down and go for a jog. I was so upset about it and so upset about how history was rewritten. Does that even make sense? Like

Seth Anderson:

I think something JP and I have talked about quite a bit over the last year and I'm working on the course and what halfway through and I kind of paused it during the summer but I'm gonna get back at it and it's definitely a lot of things in there that to your point of being embarrassed like I just didn't really know or I want to say like maybe forgot that it was taught but I don't think it was taught a lot of stuff down pack with all that and I think you know what we're trying to figure out is how do we create space and be an ally On this front as well,

Elena Iacono:

I don't think we were taught this. I don't think we were taught this hate and and we were not taught this it was glossed over swept under a rug and, well, it, it demands a lot of our demands some very hard questions. And I think, what do we do? What do we do we need to keep learning, we need to keep asking ourselves what we can do to be an ally. And we need to just keep keep, you know, really committing to, to, to to understanding.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, I think it's really important. I know a lot of people think, well, how are we going to change the past? We're not, we won't happen. But what you can do is understand what really happened in the past so that we can affect the present and make a better future.

Seth Anderson:

I agree. Well, so. That's awesome. Well, thanks so much for joining us today. Elena. It's been an absolute delight. I don't know what else to say. It's

JP Gaston:

been it's been like two hours too little. But yeah,

Seth Anderson:

it's been great to have you back.

Elena Iacono:

Why don't I bring this up to my kitchen and I'll walk you through the fundamentals of roasting. Wild boar?

JP Gaston:

Yeah, we'll start a new podcast episode one with wild boar. Sounds great. I'm in this kitchen coming to you.

Elena Iacono:

So good. It's so so good. Like that movie. What's that movie? My Big Fat Greek Wedding. Oh, wow. Make lamb I don't I'm a vegetarian. You don't eat meat. It's okay. I'll make lamb great sitting down with you both today. Thanks for having me. And yeah, let's just keep looking out for ourselves looking out for each other and just keep you know, live in life as well as we can

Unknown:

do. I mean

JP Gaston:

thanks for coming in today, Elena. Hey, thanks for listening. Have you ever thought about how to unlock your own potential and what a coach could do for you reach out anytime. We'd love to set up a free discovery session with you to see if coaching is right for you. And if we're the right coaches, just send an email coaching at the biz dojo.com