The Biz Dojo

S3E15 - Set Goals, Achieve Your Dreams w/Jordan Walsh

November 16, 2021 Jordan Walsh Season 3 Episode 15
The Biz Dojo
S3E15 - Set Goals, Achieve Your Dreams w/Jordan Walsh
Show Notes Transcript

This week in The Biz Dojo, we chat with Jordan Walsh TV personality and multi-preneur. 

We get into conversation about his focus on wellness, both physical and mental. Jordon recently took on running 100km (62mi for our US friends) as part of his wellness journey, and we talk about some of the incredible inspiration that led to a day of running (followed by weeks of recovery).

Jordan shares how he focuses to achieve both business and personal success, and works to keep himself at the top of his game not only for himself, but to ensure he can help his family, friends and business partners achieve their own success.

So, whether you're on a run, a walk, or just sitting on the couch - don't forget to perk yourself up with a little Biz Dojo Coffee (Masters Medium - OR - Dojo Dark), and  get ready to take on the world!

You can also visit us at the links below to join the discussion:
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Check out Newsly (https://newsly.me) and use promo code B1Z2021 to get a free month of premium description.

Also this week, we're sponsored by SearchHustle.com - check it out, and don't forget to choose "The Biz Dojo"  as where you heard about the program. 

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JP Gaston:

Hey, you should be listening to us on the news ileap. Just visit newsleave.me to download today and listen to the entire internet, including podcasts like this one. You can also check out our conversation with founder Jani season three, Episode Eight.

Voiceover:

This episode is powered by airdry DQ grill and chill owned and operated by local entrepreneurs. Check out one of their three airdry locations today and pick up a blizzard ice cream cake or Dilly bar. The Biz Dojo is also brought to you by beyond the beaten path. If you're on the lookout for a personalized gift, had to be on the beaten path.ca and get started on your custom creation beyond a beaten path, personalize it, because everything else is boring.

Seth Anderson:

So last week, I was driving as I do in your car, in my car. With my son by my side, as is often the case, and we were leaving his final basketball practice of the season. And so about, I guess a month and a half ago, we made the decision that he was not going to play winter basketball and then he was gonna play hockey. Yeah,

JP Gaston:

I mean, as a hockey player, I played a ton of basketball as a kid didn't play a lot of hockey. I kind of wish it was the other way around at this point.

Seth Anderson:

Well, you know, I thought Brad Craig had a pretty cool program. It's it's, you know, it's called rec, or pond hockey or something like that. It's really fun based. And it just seemed like a great opportunity to get him to try the game. Right? Pretty low pressure environment. And it's also in Redwood, there's not a lot of things happening directly in Redwood. But once the outdoor ice isn't and it's all outdoor, which I think it's so it's kind of got mystery Alaska vibes to it.

JP Gaston:

So those 5am practices outdoors are not going to be fun. Well,

Seth Anderson:

we'll see. So anyway, we decided to do that. Anyway. We're leaving his final basketball practice. And I always asked him how to go, what'd you learn, yada, yada, yada. And he's telling me how great it was and how much fun they had playing mini games. And then we get to the corner and he's super quiet. And I'm like, What's up, and then he just started crying. And he cried almost the entire way home. And he wasn't like, sad, necessarily, I don't know that I would use sad to describe it necessarily. But like, he just really, really, really enjoyed his time there. And, you know, he wants to continue and he will, like I said, you're gonna keep playing basketball. Don't worry, you got lots of basketball left in you. We're gonna give this hockey thing you know, try and, you know, we always go to the Cochran gym and play and stuff. But just to see like the emotion flat out of him of like, how much he took away from that experience and how much it meant to him. It was hard for me not to get choked up. And it just reminded me of how impactful sport is on us as people and especially in those formative years.

JP Gaston:

Absolutely. We've talked a few times about me starting my coaching journey as a

Seth Anderson:

seven year old.

JP Gaston:

And like, I still I still remember playing on that team. I still remember, I didn't play on the team, I coach, but I remember playing on the team. And then the following year coaching that team and every time I've coached anything, whenever the kids move on to another sport, or it's just you know, their last year or whatever, it's hard as a coach to like, just, it's emotional. Like you're excited for them. You're happy that they're continuing on to do something they love you hope they took some stuff away. And it's like, it's like a happy, sad moment. combined. Yeah.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah. That's how I would describe it. It's like, Man, I had so much fun, and I really loved that. But you kind of want to do it forever. Yeah. But then there's that lesson that comes with it that everything ends and to enjoy what it was, I don't know. It was a it was an impactful moment. And then you fast forward, you know, a couple of days. And we're playing hockey, and I'm helping coach's hockey team. And yesterday, we had practice. And at the end of the practice, he's like, this is the best thing I've ever done. Like he enjoyed it so much. And it's like, it's just so cool to see him kind of goes through those ebbs and flows of life, but just how much good, fun, fulfilling stuff that he's getting to do and how much of that is through sport. And I'm just trying to try to drink it all in and you know, enjoy it with him.

JP Gaston:

Not just sport, but taking on something new and different. Right? Like it's sport sport is the vehicle. Yeah, but just cool that he's just trying something different. Cuz there's, I mean, there's a lot of parents out there who wouldn't let their kids try something different. So You know, kudos to you for having him try something new and different and encouraging him. And there's a lot of kids who, you know, sure I'll quit basketball, if I can play more fortnight or there's a lot of there's a lot of kids who wouldn't try something new. So it's, well, it's tough to some when they do,

Seth Anderson:

yeah, it's tough to jump in when you're 10. And we'll see other kids have been playing since they're five, right? Like, that's, that's just the reality of it in the hockey world, you know, a lot of kids start in that five, six year old range. And he's 10 and jump in late, much like I did, and, you know, I just reassure him that he's at least 10 times better than I was, when I first started. And he's only gonna get better if he, you know, just puts in a little bit of effort and does his best. And, you know, the most important thing, though, is just having fun. And he's already got to meet a bunch of new kids that he never would have met otherwise, have some experiences, again, that he never would have had otherwise. And it'll all kind of help him build and develop his character going forward.

JP Gaston:

And in this episode, we talk with Jordan, a fair bit about sport, and specifically, he goes into running a high

Seth Anderson:

100k. Like, I can't even I did

JP Gaston:

a marathon blow. So like, I think it was 2008 2009 is a while ago. Yeah. Back when I used to have legs that worked. I ran a marathon, I just decided, hey, I'm gonna run a marathon and found the closest one, which was happening eight weeks later,

Seth Anderson:

was it just like myself outside of your house? You're just like, I'm looking for every Oh, there's one and you kind of went?

JP Gaston:

Yeah. And I just I, I jumped in at the start. And then I took a cab to the end, and I won.

Seth Anderson:

Oh, very Homer Simpson. Yes. Yeah.

JP Gaston:

No, I ran it. It was good. But that was, that's 42.2 kilometers. And at the end, as I, as I crossed the finish line, I basically told myself, I would never run 42 kilometers, even cumulatively, for as long as I like that. It hurt. There was two weeks where I just needed people to do things for me. But just the drive to try something new. And to get an experience, like it was on my bucket list, just just to do a marathon. I didn't care about time. Like I had no aspirations of running the Calgary marathon and being chosen to go to the Boston Marathon. Because of my amazing time. I just wanted to cross the finish line. Yeah. And I will say the halfway mark that they they always talk about there being this sort of wall at the halfway mark is absolutely real. Right? It feels like you ran into a wall, in part because, you know, I saw guys running the other way who were on the last 300 meters. Of course, it's like sheets, that guy's gonna be done. He's gonna go home, have some lunch, hang out with his family, probably watch a couple movies, come back here and watch me finish later tonight.

Seth Anderson:

Is that a deflating moment? Or would it inspire you to kind of finish it up?

JP Gaston:

I think I was self inspired through most of it. Because because I did have the mentality that I just wanted to check it off the list. And however long it took is how long it took. I would say it was mildly deflating. It was inspirational for for a moment, but only because I the first thought in my head was, well, I must be near the end if those guys are finished. And then I saw the next mile marker and I was like, oh,

Seth Anderson:

was how old? were you when you ran it? Were you in the last read like a, like 28 or 29 or something like that?

JP Gaston:

Yeah, I would have been 13 years ago. So 2728.

Seth Anderson:

Okay, I read a book. Just I read a book. That's it. Just

JP Gaston:

That's it. I'm moving on now.

Seth Anderson:

called when the scientific or the science behind perfect timing or something. And it is by Daniel Pink. And it talked about how you're like, I can't remember the numbers, but like 60, or 70% more likely to run a marathon at the ages of like 2829 or 3839 4849. Because you kind of get that itch to check off bucket list items. Mortality becomes a thing that you started thinking about. And in those ages, you see a lot more people running marathons, apparently

JP Gaston:

interesting. I don't think any of that crossed my mind. I was literally just like, I'm not doing anything. I'm not playing any sports. So I was playing a little bit of ball hockey, I need something to do a little exercise and then gave myself eight weeks, literally did not run further than a half marathon in my training. And I only did that once and at the end of it thought I'm never gonna finish this. Like, I ran 21 kilometers and by the time I got home, I was like, there's no like, there is no way this thing's in three weeks. I've ran a half marathon once and I'm out for a week. So this is gonna suck.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, I have no aspiration to run a marathon. Maybe I will one day but it's not a niche that I have.

JP Gaston:

Well, meanwhile, as I'm coming up to the finish, I ran the last like a kilometer With this woman who was like easily in her 60s and I caught up to her, which means she was ahead of 28 year old

Seth Anderson:

because you were your goalie pads on your

JP Gaston:

wish? No. So I got and, and it was great because her son actually came onto the course and jog with her a little bit just as she finished the race. And so the three of us were chatting, and it was like her seventh marathon or something. So that instantly made me feel better. I was like, okay, good. This is a this is a veteran marathon runner. tactics that allow her to skip the line or something. No. Yeah, exactly. And yeah, so we just ran the last little and then I'm, I think I talked about it on the pod too. I'm one of those guys who's like you got to finish strong. And so I just took off from her for the last 100 meters, mostly to make it looked like I beat her. But it was it that was that was probably the most inspiring piece. Like I loved getting the little thing at the end that said, hey, hear you hurt yourself for five hours. But I think the most inspirational piece for me was just having the conversation with her and talking about her journey and it was great. All three sport.

Seth Anderson:

Very cool, very inspiring. Well, let's get into the episode, shall we?

JP Gaston:

Let's do it.

Seth Anderson:

Welcome to The Biz Dojo with Seth and JP. This week in the dojo, we're joined by Jordan Walsh. Jordan, welcome to the dojo actually. Welcome to the dojo.

Jordan Walsh:

Literally as you see, I think I'm the inaugural interviewer inside the dojo and I gotta say you're, you got a lot of Vancouver Canucks and two little Colorado Avalanche.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah. I apologize. I have one Vancouver Canucks picture in here. My boy Trevor Linden Kirk McLean games six Stanley Cup Finals Linden with the blood all over his jersey. I think one of the most iconic hockey pictures of all time is to

Jordan Walsh:

get picture and you got your son named Linden after Trevor Linden.

Seth Anderson:

It wasn't it was part of the inspiration for sure. Very cool. That's cool. So JP can join us. JP is on the big screen with us. And we apologize in advance if the audio is a little choppy. We're gonna we're gonna work through it as we start to do more interviews in the dojo. But like I said, we're joined by Jordan, Jordan, even wear a bunch of hats. You're involved with a bunch of things. Maybe introduce yourself to the folks that are listening in today.

Jordan Walsh:

Yeah, so Jordan Walsh born and raised Wainwright, Alberta. That's how I know you Seth from your time back with the GDB Bisons which I know you've elaborated on a little bit for those consistent listeners to The Biz Dojo podcast. You know what you took me under your wing I was only 18 years of age. Honestly, our connection runs back to my my green days and business not saying I'm still green, only 27. But he took me on your way and gave me a chance and I took it and ran with it. I know. We're gonna talk a little bit later on about transitioning from sports into entrepreneurialship which is exciting. I mean, that's something that I learned a lot from back in Wainwright and continue to take and run with. So now I you know, I've moved from radio over to television a number of years ago. I've got four other companies that I'm a big part of we got two television shows one called the rifleman, which is hosted by myself and airs in Canada, the United States on Sportsman's channel, kind of my main bread and butter. And what I built on my other legs off of our second show was backwards backstage with myself good buddy, Brett kissel and a couple members of his close family. Great, great time out there with everybody. And that's really you know, what we've engineered other businesses on obviously the deuce vodka, which I'm proud to be a part of, and a product that our team is very, very proud of. Available in Alberta and Saskatchewan, and our distribution company, all the products that we utilize, you know, inside the shows, we also imported the United States and distribute through Western Canada. And I guess in a nutshell that's you know, what, the last six years of my life then very excited to be in the dojo to name talk a little bit more about that and some other more personal stuff

JP Gaston:

you said in a nutshell, that's a huge nutshell for sure. Like there's a lot of stuff that is the biggest nutshell

Seth Anderson:

not saying that show

Jordan Walsh:

yeah, no, for sure. Tell me about it. I hear about it all the time from from my fiance that I've got too much on the goal and it is a tough balance for sure. But

Seth Anderson:

how do you balance that like what is your how do you prioritize the many nuts in the shelf?

Jordan Walsh:

Yeah, I mean, I wish I had a direct answer for that. And it probably varies for everybody but honestly for me, I try to intertwine them and I think that that's what I started with in the beginning Think of it like a spider right like my The body my spider is kind of television and hunting outdoor related television. And that's where everything else stems off of, you know, my relationship with Brett Brett kissel, the country music artist, he wanted to do a show in COVID. Obviously there's there's no concerts going on his tour last year got canceled his tour this year got canceled, we still wants to perform and interact with people. So we started a television show which I produce and then one of the hosts of off that, you know, when now part of his his vodka company. And I guess he just, you can ever buy a beer for the wrong guy is a label that I like. So just using my television show, to meet people meet other business opportunities, and then kind of prioritize which ones I think have a chance to be successful, and invest a little time and maybe a little money to in those. The distribution side of things is a prime example of that. I'm marketing these products on my show, I'm running my show, why wouldn't I double dip and import them into United States and then sell to all the storefronts from Mart now marketing your product and distributing it. So I think for me, it's not so much prioritizing one or the other, it's how can I connect and bring in not only my businesses, but other people's businesses, and try to make, I guess, the end of the day myself dollars, but other people's dollars. So that, you know, you might have a sponsor for 25,001 year? Well, if you sell $40,000 worth of product, that marketing is paid for. And it's just a bonus. So you know, you're going to have those clients year after year after year. So I guess to answer your question, and tie it all back together, I don't know if I prioritize with businesses, one over the other. It's how can I intertwine them all, so that it's a snowball effect that everything just grows and grows? And everyone that's involved is is coming on ahead? And I think that's very important. You know, it's, you hear guys like Grant Cardone, and and you know, Ed, my lad always talk about its revenue streams, you know, if you want to attain wealth and sustainable wealth, you got to have more than one revenue stream. I don't think there's a magic number. Some of them say there is, you know, maybe some people, it's three, maybe it's 567. But you've got to continue to build off your main revenue stream, and devolves into others. tying that back to family. Well, you got to, like my buddy, Brett says you got to make a life not. So at the end of the day, you can have all the money in the world. If you don't you guys know what if you don't have love in a family, you've just got a full bank account, you don't have a full heart, you're not going to go far. So I try to monitor that I don't have any silver bullet for that. But when I feel a little bit like I need some family time, like this weekend, for example, you know, we get away to Jasper, and it is what it is.

Seth Anderson:

We're going to talk quite a bit about business, some of the things you've learned along the way. One of the things that you did fairly recently, when when did you run that? Okay, yeah. Oh, end of August, end of August. So you're a guy who's accomplished quite a bit, you're 27. Now if you're in the back half your 20s

Jordan Walsh:

Yeah. And it feels like a two I swear I'm getting older by the day. Literally,

Seth Anderson:

that is literally true. We are all getting older. So you're you're trying to figure out what's my next challenge? What's the genesis of, you know, sitting on the coach one day to running 100k?

Jordan Walsh:

Well, and I know you can talk to this too, with the terms of you know, fitness and health and physical, physical health, because you've taken a lot more snaps than I am. Congrats to you for that. But thanks for me, it started a number of years ago when I was in New Zealand, I guess about three, two and a half, three years ago, before COVID. There, I went to New Zealand and I went on a tar hunt, which for those who don't know, tar is like our version of a gold like the white Billy goes to live on the top of the mountain. Yeah, that's their version of that. So you got to go to the top of the mountain in order to get that. So I go down here to New Zealand and I got a good buddy of mine at the time and actually a mentor and a life coach at the time Derrick stone from stone Performance Academy and I don't work with Derek anymore, but he's, he's a great guy. And, you know, he, he changed my life and a lot of positive ways. And this was one of them. I'm over there. And you know, I'm 24 and I kind of realized I'm out of shape, like I'm not out of shape, but for 24 What I'm trying to do, I'm out of shape. And it's not going to be acceptable when I travel around the world. And I'm not physically capable enough at whatever age let alone 24 to get to the top of a mountain to get my job done.

Seth Anderson:

And so when you say out of shape, like you're huffing and puffing as you're going up the hill

Jordan Walsh:

everybody's just a hat on the you know what I mean? And you know, I'm a young guy I should be up there with with these older guys right now they're in great shape but for me it was an eye opener. If you're in better shape, I'm going to do better so it came back and ever since that I started running and and you know working out and I I really subscribe to saunas, like that is a life changing thing. That's my thing. Yeah, if you want to, you know, some mental clarity and get your your peak performance to another level. Invest in a sauna don't have to be $10,000 so you can get a 70 $100 Sauna they all heat up for the most part. They all do the same thing.

Seth Anderson:

You have Asana, yoga, Asana, JP

JP Gaston:

many a time usually when I'm at some sort of resort or something. I'm like, Oh son, I am definitely taken advantage of that. Oh, yeah, I find it way more like I love pools but I like I find pools or work Yeah, trying to float. You're trying to move around saunas, just sit down and enjoy and get in your own head for a few minutes and get a sweat on. And yeah, I like absolutely.

Seth Anderson:

I think there's, like just heat therapy in general, like, I've recently gone back to the gym pretty significantly, like four times a week, and I hit the hot tub for 10 minutes before every workout, and my body has never felt better. Yeah, like, I don't have to stretch as much I do, I still do a bit of like a dynamic sort of stretching routine. But it's like 1/10 of what I was doing when I used to go to the gym pre COVID. And I find the hot tub beforehand just been a total gamechanger

JP Gaston:

heat in general man, like, yeah, I went, I went to my chiropractor the other day. And they always throw like the hot towel or whatever over your shoulders or on your back. For the first time ever. When I walked in, there was a new chiropractor. I've never been to him before. But the receptionist came into the room with me and through the hot towels on my back right away. And I just laid there for 10 minutes while I waited for my appointment time. And then he walked in and my back was already ready to go. And it was like the most amazing thing ever.

Jordan Walsh:

And the beginning, you're probably like, wow, what kind of chiropractors Yes.

JP Gaston:

What's going on here?

Jordan Walsh:

For sure. No, I think you hit something that really, you know, speaks to me. A lot of people when they're in the mountains on a vacation or whatever, that's when they go to a sauna. That's when they go to a hot tub. So like, yeah, all the health attributes you mentioned. Plus that mental clarity of hey, you know, your body automatically associates that gap with with a vacation or with a feel good scenario in the mountains. Well, now, you know, I've just built it into the basement, my whole so you get that physical wellness, but you also get a lot of mental clarity and a lot of my good ideas and a lot of you know, just keeping my brain clear and on track happens in the sauna,

Seth Anderson:

mental clarity, I think it's interesting, you bring up the point of sort of being able to put yourself somewhere Mm hmm. And I've had this conversation and some of the coaching I've been doing. And I know JP and I have talked about this, like if you envision your ideal day or you're the perfect place, but if that's Assad on the mountains, and you can kind of just put yourself there mentally just for a moment. Yeah. Before a stressful event before you run 100 Maybe what did you do that? I guess my question now that I'm thinking about did you have to do that at all while you were running your 100k?

Jordan Walsh:

Well, and you're talking about that Happy Gilmore, happy place. anybody's seen the movie Happy Gilmore. That is exactly jobs. Peterson right there. It doesn't get any better. Yeah. my happy place. Did I do that on the run? No, I guess I did, in a sense, but I didn't go like when I'm in the sauna. This will sound really weird. I always like I'll close my eyes. And I'll do almost like a meditation. And I wouldn't call it that. But I'm better at meditating. I think I don't do enough of it. Whatever you call it a meditation. I guess maybe you could I just I'm not really familiar with with meditation, I just try to get through a zen place and turn my brain off and just feel good and focus on I need to do at the end of it.

Seth Anderson:

Survey says that sounds like meditation. Okay. Well, I think meditation. You know, there's a lot of people who talk about it, but like you can, I don't know what you think about this gap. But I feel like if you're on a walk, and you're just like totally in the zone, that's like a form of meditating.

JP Gaston:

My favorite video, the moment meditation on YouTube. I've watched that thing a million times. But it just teaches you like how in the moment to really hyper focus on the things around you and block out everything else. And whether that's like a thing you're doing or on a specific thought, or however you want to use that focus. I actually use it playing hockey all the time. I've actually played games where I can't even think of things outside the rink. I get so focused that I literally just see blackness in my mind when I think of anything other than hockey. It's it's a really weird feeling. But once you've done it a million times, and I've watched that video, probably 2 million times to get to that. But once you've done it enough, you start to experience it like that. And it's just it's life changing.

Seth Anderson:

I think Jordan is familiar with blackness in the hockey rink, but it has more to do with your concussions but oh yeah.

Jordan Walsh:

Secretly the best thing that ever happened me but I mean I still pay for it every day in full

JP Gaston:

Hey, everyone, if you didn't already know this episode is sponsored by search hustle.com. Your resource for digital marketing training. It's taught by digital marketers at the bleeding edge for digital marketers at the bleeding edge business owners and fresh marketing grads and it's free for a limited time at search hustle.com forward slash beta dash group. That's B E T A hyphen gr o up

Seth Anderson:

I think you touched on some really interesting points there. Jamie smart. He's a he's a he's a coach and a perfect New York Times bestseller but he's a best selling author and his book is called Clarity and He has a YouTube video, it's one of my favorites. And it's about sort of an analogy about kids and teddy bears, and how we as adults basically have teddy bears and how we project our feelings or our thoughts on to other things, charity or boss or bank balance or personality. They give me the example he gives his vacation, and how, you know, we love vacations, right? You love vacations, your traveler, no vacation is good enough to give you a feeling. This is Yeah, because of all your feelings come from within 100%. And so when you said that, just around getting that mental clarity, being able to sort of process that you're creating a feeling in the moment, it's a very powerful tool to have in your I'll call it like emotional well being toolkit. While you're

Jordan Walsh:

kinda, you're hitting home for me, because a number of reasons. But this might be a little negative, Nancy, but I mean, I've been very fortunate to do a lot of the things I grew up wanting to do. And I'll just say that pilot hockey bear hunting 100%. And I can truthfully say that everything you think is going to be a 10 isn't really ever a 10. It's more like a 7.5 or an eight. But as soon as you kind of realize that it's not a sad realization, it's just a real realization that nothing unless you let it is going to be as great as you want it to be, then you kind of start to appreciate those eights as those 10s. And that's when I think you really start to realize, hey, I actually feel really great, hey, this is amazing. And whatever the case might be, but like you say, if you don't let yourself feel that, or you're always, I don't want to say a glass half empty, half full, but even three quarters full and a quarter empty. He can't look at it like that. But I think everybody needs to their own, has to kind of have a few of those moments where everybody's got different goals. Maybe somebody wants to drive a certain car, maybe somebody wants to run a certain race, but they check off a few of those and realize it's great, but it's not we maybe thought it would be, then you'll start to appreciate all your wins even more. And I think that's when you kind of geared up into that 10 out of 10 category, kind of what you're talking about. I

Seth Anderson:

think it's in the it's in the vein, I think it's once you realize that whatever you're looking for, is actually inside of you. 100% Yeah, you know,

Jordan Walsh:

it's nothing external.

JP Gaston:

Do you think it's because we place expectation on it once we start thinking about it, because like, I just think of, like, the greatest experiences that I've ever had, like, I went to Africa for a month. Yeah. And I literally went into that thinking that trip to Africa will be cool. Like, I didn't have really high expectations. I just thought, I'm going to spend a month in a cool place. I'm going to let it come at me. However it comes at me. And And honestly, that trip was a 10, maybe an 11.

Jordan Walsh:

I think you're 100%. Right?

JP Gaston:

It was one of the best things that I've ever done in my life. And I recommend it to everybody. So if you're listening to this, go to Africa, do it, do it. I agree

Jordan Walsh:

in there a couple times. It is amazing. Africa is an amazing place. Don't be scared, just get on the plane and go, Yeah, but

JP Gaston:

like we set these expectations when we when we when we set what we want to achieve our goal or whatever we're putting we put expectations around it. So we automatically fence it in. And we think it has to fulfill this space for us. And if it doesn't, then we didn't achieve what we wanted to achieve. So then, to your point when we actually go and get that car. Sure we've wanted it since we were six years old, we've got this like sweet, 67 Chevy that we've been dreaming about since we had a hot wheel of it. And I sit in it. And we're like, this is like a seven and a half and eight. It's pretty cool. I like I don't want to trade it.

Seth Anderson:

But it was no it was never actually that thing. Right. It was the feeling associated to it, which was based on a thought you had and you guys

Jordan Walsh:

are absolutely right. Yes, I agree entirely.

Seth Anderson:

So, pivoting back to the run, what did you learn about yourself in that experience,

Jordan Walsh:

there was a journey that started like I said a couple years ago. And last year, I you know, I ran quite a lot. And just with COVID and everything I you know, it was like just some I could go and do. And with my work working from home, I worked at home all the time or they're on the road or wherever I'm on my computer, I could do a job so I needed to get away. And you know, I couldn't go anywhere. So it was just a run. I started doing you know I did a 21k and I've never actually entered into event or anything I just do it for myself. I don't do it to get a little metal at the end or ribbon that I that I did around I mean if that's somebody's motivation, keep kicking ass but for me it was just so I could say I did it. No one can ever take any of that away from, you know, a car or whatever they can take away but hey, I ran a half marathon. Hey, I ran a full marathon. Hey, I ran 100k Don't ever take that away. And that's what I liked. So, last year, I did run quite a bit. I did a couple halfs you know 21 23k somewhere in that vicinity that I did to quote unquote full marathons or I did 44k or just under 40 4k 43.7 I think is actually a marathon.

Seth Anderson:

But did you do a lot of training for those things like were you all in or were you just like basically running those?

Jordan Walsh:

It was more a mental thing and the human Rain is such an amazing tool. Like, I mean, if you tell yourself you can do something, you can just do it. So that was for me, I guess the biggest thing like I guess last year, you could say I train because I ran three, four or five times a week. But this year, all in I probably ran a dozen times. So up until no one I like total, like cold like April I don't run in the winter. That's for the birds. But for me to now, I probably around a dozen times, I've been more weightlifting and stuff like that this summer. But yeah, I just, you know, I know I can do it. It's just a matter of going out and doing it. So I kind of realized that, look, I'm not getting any younger, I'm not getting in any better shape. When I started this, this running thing I wanted to do 100 kilometers because shout out to our buddy Nick Fallon. I remember, you know, for 17 I was sitting on a plane flying to Denver, Colorado, ironically enough, and I got a text he had just had a, an aneurysm was the same day as a humble crash. It was identical same day, so I think is April 6, or seventh. And I was like, Whoa, that guy hit me hard. And he's my age. He just, you know, healthy guy. He's been athletic, you know, he was playing in regular still, he was still in red here. Yeah, with the college team, the canes or whatever. I remember. And it was crazy. And literally like a couple months later, he went off to BC with a bunch of our other friends and they supported him and he ran his I think he's 108 like an actual Ultra event. He did 108 kilometers. And I just remember when I started running,

Seth Anderson:

Thumbelina, yo, Nick and like, doesn't surprise me at all because his brother does that stuff, too. Doesn't he?

Jordan Walsh:

Doesn't used to do a lot of the, what was it like triathlons? Yeah, that's exactly what it was.

Seth Anderson:

But like brain aneurism. Not sure if he's gonna make it

Jordan Walsh:

90 days later. 100 AK 124 hours, but he will come on, right. And he didn't train for it at all. I remember being after he done it. Maybe the first time I seen him. So like maybe six months after that. We're sitting at a party, that just a casual outdoor thing. Anyway, right. And I asked him like, what like, did you train like, he's like, No, I just I knew I could do it. And I just when they did it, I just everybody, and I hope he doesn't let me say he's like, everybody kept saying, Oh, I'm really sorry that happened to you or something along those lines. And Nick, I apologize if I'm wrong, but and he just he hated he's like that. No, it's fine. Like, I'm it's good. I don't need your sympathy. Like, I can go and do something like I had to go and do something. So that people were like, like, actually, you know, Hey, I am okay. But be now Okay, fine. Like I'm good. Leave me alone. I mean, not in a bad way. But like he just crushed it. And I just that just stuck with me. So like if he listens to this, that totally so and I've told him this before, too. I messaged him before I did it actually tried last year to do it. And he mentioned my concussions I got a migraine and I think I ran 12k And I knew like I have a migraine, I can probably go to like 7080 but I'm gonna power out because when I have my migraines like you're really tired with quick, so I stopped. And then this year, I knew how to do it. Because I'm like I'm getting in worse shape. I'm not getting lazier, but I'm getting busier, I don't have as much time. So I just kind of said to him and do it. My biggest thing was I wanted to have that 100 kilometers on my iPhone, because that's what I always run with Kayla check my iPhone, and I'm a 21.5 kilowatt reboots every 24 hours. So if I did it over 24 hours, and I started at like six in the morning, and I finished at 3am Let's say the next day I wouldn't have I'd have like 80 and 20 to the third amendment, I started at midnight, and I was gonna run like 20k and then take like an hour rest and keep going. But I kept running it was obviously cooler at night. And I'm looking at the forecast. And it'd be like plus 32 that day, it's like, well, if I don't get like 70k done before 8am I'm toast. So I did and I just kept going and it took me I think just just under just over seven like 1708 17 hours about to do it, which is it's actually just a like, just below average time for people that do the events. Like I think like 1620 1630s, pretty average size 40 minutes over that. But no training, nothin. Just the mindset to get it done.

JP Gaston:

That's awesome. I decided in 2008 or 2009, I decided I wanted to check off running a marathon off my bucket list. And I and I was not running at all. My training was eight weeks, I was I just saw a marathon pop up on my on my phone as an event I could sign up for and I was like, I'm doing it eight weeks from now here I go 43 kilometers. Let's run it. And I didn't like I think I ran once in my quote training, I ran a half marathon. And it might have killed me. Like, I remember getting home and just lying on the floor in our living room. Thinking I don't know if I'm gonna do it. But to your point earlier, like it's amazing what the brain can do and when you get running. Sure, you know, I was at the halfway point watching people run back from the end of the route and crossing the finish line and I was like, Oh crap. I'm only halfway and these guys are already done. Yeah, but I wasn't I wasn't there for the I mean, I've got the little belt buckle metal that they give in Calgary isn't there for that I yeah, I was there to check off the thing off my list and to say hey, you know what I ran into So no one can take that from me. It's not a thing everyone does.

Jordan Walsh:

100%. But even if you're in the back half of that marathon, you're still in the, you know, top 4% of the world that's even done it. You know what I mean?

Seth Anderson:

I think when you were telling me about this story, Jordan, one of the most impactful parts, and I love that Nick mountain stuff, Nick, if you're listening, I'd love to have you on to talk about that. Because, again, I

Jordan Walsh:

don't give a lot of shout out. Like, there's not a people that inspiring that I can honestly say, that was one of the top five things. Like, if I didn't know, Nick, I probably wouldn't have ever put my mind to doing something else. Probably just not that 100k

Seth Anderson:

So you cross the finish line, walk me through your emotions and what that felt

Jordan Walsh:

like. It was Yeah, so I mean, the last I went really hard on the first 70k Because I put it in my head that if I didn't do that, by like eight, which should be more than attainable. And it was I was gonna not be able to do it because of the heat. And so I pushed it push it, push it, push it and I you know, really, really messed up my left leg. I should have timed it should have pace myself way better. But I didn't so I played the hand that I was dealt and whatnot. So the last I would say 15k was like hell black better term. And I you know, I just keep telling myself, okay, like, you don't run for and you can walk one run for and you can walk, just get there, get there, get there and I keep watching and I'm like, you know 92 Kilometer associate talk a game last quarter. Let's get the car out. And then let's get to Connor McDavid. Let's get the Gretzky K. As soon as we get the Gretzky, it's like, I'm just going on the homestretch. There's no 100 shooting for them. I'm just trying to get over it. Let's get the hell out of here. So I was actually pretty close to my house, like I had mapped out what 100k was, and I kind of have myself finishing within a good distance in my house. So like, I'm just gonna run in my house, it's within 3k, let's just go home. And then you're done. Like, you just go home, you know, you get your massage gun, you're on your feet, you get in the tub, you get in that. So whatever you need to do, just get there. So I turn it on, I'm going, I'm going. And next thing you know, I can see my house and I'm in so much pain. And all of a sudden, you just kind of get this jolt of I don't know if it's like accomplishment or thankfulness that I'm still like, Thank God, I've done this, like, how dumb was it to do this, like in that moment, but you know, we kind of find fifth gear again, and you finish it off real strong. And I just remember I ran in my front lawn, I laid down and it was like this euphoric feeling, which I don't have a great like, I don't, you know, when I was younger, I didn't really have a lot of feelings. Like I actually went and, you know, seen a psychologist and stuff when I was younger, to really help me identify my feelings and stuff. So it's not, it's something that I've really turned into a tool now, separate conversation, but like, I don't get a lot of, I'm proud of myself, I don't get a lot of I'm really happy with myself. But when I was laying on that grass, like and I don't, I don't cry. But I'll admit, I started like crying. I was so happy with myself that I actually did this. And of all the things that I've done, I was one of the very few that I'll give myself. Sam was actually proud of myself for that

JP Gaston:

Russia. Dopamine is so good. That's exactly what it is. Yeah. I remember, when I stepped over the finish line for the marathon. My whole body was like, Yeah, you're done. No, but my brain was like, that was the most amazing thing. Let's do it again. Like it was.

Jordan Walsh:

Yeah. Well, that, you know, however, it probably lasted like an hour for me, and then I was in pain and whatnot, but it's just men, you've got another call for forever, like I said, but that's what keeps the guy going back like that hour after like, never doing that again. I don't care somebody pays me 25 grand, I don't care if it's for charity, or some you know what, I don't care. I'm never doing it again. And now I'm like, That feeling was really good. Like, I bet if I did 125k I could get it again. And it's like it's never ending. Right?

Seth Anderson:

Has there been any lessons that you've taken from that over the last while it's only been a couple of months? But yeah. Do you find any difference in your mindset? A that you know, you can do stuff? Or did you find something inside of yourself that is carried over? Maybe helping you not? You know, you talked about those sevens and eights at attends? Did you find some of that in that moment? Well

Jordan Walsh:

the first thing I found in myself and the lesson I learned is if something really hurts, just go to the doctor don't be too pigheaded because I end up cracking my left foot like a big stress fracture. And if I had gone in earlier, they could have done more for now none they can do for it. I got to deal with it every morning I wake up and feel like I'm 76 with arthritis. So that's the first lesson so

Seth Anderson:

you wanted to feel younger but you ended up feeling old 100%

Jordan Walsh:

But I mean to tie back to you that lessons that I yeah, I think it's just anything I mean I I think everyone kind of knows us you you listen to a podcast and you hear it but until you prove it to yourself like you don't get it anything your brain tells your body that it can do it can do you just gotta go do it. And then you're off to the races. So you can take that and you can apply it to other physical attributes are you know you you've lost I don't know how many pounds you're in great shape now and compared to what you were 70 years ago.

Seth Anderson:

100 pounds.

Jordan Walsh:

You know how much talk but you got you don't drink at all anymore or tired at all. you retired like, you know, you just woke up one morning, you're like, I'm not drinking, I'm sure there was days are easier, and some of them were

Seth Anderson:

more inevitable. Actually, there was no difficult days. Once I decided that I wasn't going to drink anymore. I just stopped drinking. And I mean, there was many indicators that I should stop drinking long before I did. You know, being allergic to it as a starting point. You know, no turning bright red every time I took a sip of beer. I mean, it progressed, I remember that. Yeah. Because it was like, I'd I drink a whole bunch. And then I would turn around, he lit up like a Christmas tree, pretty much immediate. And then I was immediate. It's like, okay, well, this isn't normal.

Jordan Walsh:

Oh, I never thought of that good call. Great Call. Yeah.

Seth Anderson:

So that coupled with, you know, just, it was just the right thing for the life that I wanted to live. And I, I actually thought it would be more difficult. Yeah. But to your point, the day I decided I was done was that

Jordan Walsh:

when I tell a lot of people that like, every year, I'll do one to two months sober, because you know what, I'll be the first thing that I drink probably more than I should, responsibly of course, but you know, working in alcohol with our do squad car, you know, meeting with clients, and they always want to be shown a good time and you want to, you want to deliver that. You got to make a sure you keep a handle on it. And B, make sure you're doing it responsibly. So every year I do anywhere from four to 48 weeks, just sober. And, you know, just because I know I can't, and I don't have a problem with that. I do it. And it is what it is actually just sober. So don't call it that. But I guess sober September. And it's just, you know, I tell people that they want to quit your goal. It's so hard. It's so hard. It's like no, it's it's not as long as you think you can do and you got to have a reason to do it to like, you know, you've just listed a couple right? Well, I

Seth Anderson:

think the reason for me was myself, it was my personal health. That was the reason it wasn't for anyone else. I mean, I knew there would be benefits to other people, by me not drinking, but it was for myself. And I think one of the things that I had told myself for a really long time is that I needed to drink for business, right? Like you go to you see people you're engaging with them, you have a drink, you have a beer, it's just what you do, that becomes part of just the language of, of everything. And I remember I went to a business meeting in Detroit, when I was helping a friend start doing the startup thing a couple years ago. And we're in the penthouse Office of the CEO. And he's got his own private wine collection. And this is literally three weeks after I decided I was done drinking. And so you're standing there, and there's all these business executives, and this guy's you know, pouring drinks of his own private wine. And I'm like, No, thanks. I'm good. I'll just have water. That's the moment I knew you were okay. I mean, not even that. I was like, it was just like, You know what, I don't actually know. That was just a story. I was telling myself.

Jordan Walsh:

I can't say that because like I said, I do that, let's say one month every year, but this year was different. So I I still talk to a psychologist you know, but once a month just be just keep my pencil sharp, more so about how I can you know, manage business and life and family more than anything to be honest and make sure that I'm on the right path. But I was talking to her right at beginning September. They're just after I'd run that run a couple weeks after maybe doesn't matter. And I was telling ya, they don't want me to do this sober month that ship full chassis so funny. Like, why do you think that you have to and I said, what I just said, like, you know, we're in meetings with clients and done it on and on. I mean, don't get me wrong, I have fun while drinking but she's uh, you don't need to have an alcoholic beverage in order to have fun or in order to do business. She's like, when you're doing your month. Watch yourself in these instances where you usually have a beer, you know, primarily business and see try to just exist and be present and you'll probably enjoy yourself just as much. So that was really what I focused on throughout this this month of doing it. And I gotta admit, I just like what you said. I've got a funny example that's down here to a tee what you just said, so, kissel does a couple meet and greets with stores that have to do spod well Wainwright is one of them. So we obviously sold out Wayne right because I'm from there. And we go we do a meet and greet at Duane Reade liquor and cold beer store. And it's a huge success. Everybody's having a great time. And Jay the owner brains of Santa some of the staff at the end and they had just had a wreck where you know, they've got a shelf that's got like anywhere from $4,000 bottle of tequila or whatever to $25,000 bottle of of rye or poured around. Well, they were bombing out of the base winters military training facility, and one of the shelves fell and like a dozen of these five to $20,000 bottles broke. So thank God they got insurance, but that's not the point. His story. Point. His story is he had 116 $1,000 bottle of tequila, that there was most of it left it was just broke. So he saved it all and he had like a couple of shots left where he offered us all a shot of this healer and he was like, Oh, I had to really like take a look. I mean, that's exactly what you're saying. I was in that exact same scenario and I wouldn't say like you I had like gone but I'm just like, I can still be in this moment and and be alright, no, the first thing I did in October when I was off sober training was go and try that tequila but hey, in the moment I didn't need it.

Seth Anderson:

No It's interesting because like, I didn't really like in the moment, I guess I realized that but it wasn't until I was looking back on it later that I realized that was the moment. Yeah. And I think that's the beginning of any self improvement journey. For me, that was part of my journey. But really, whatever journey you're going on losing weight, improving relationships with people, Breaking Bad habits, all of it starts at self awareness. Yeah. And so as you move forward, what are some of your key motivators in your life? So you want to take care of your personal health, obviously, for yourself? What? How does that translate back? I know you have a young daughter and setting an example for her. What is that? How does that all kind of come together?

Jordan Walsh:

You know, in terms of motivation, I kind of take that into parts. Motivate, I've got a number of different motivating factors, but like, some people crucify me for this, and you know, what, my, my best attribute might be my kryptonite, but my biggest motivator, honestly, is money. How do I make money for myself? How do I make money for all my partners, my friends, and I don't mean that rude, like, I want all the money. I mean, I want everybody that I work with, and that I care about to be successful. So I'm going to do everything that I can to ensure that and I guess that, you know, just leaks into every friendship and relationship and partnership, I guess, that I have, with respects to the family, you know, will be my daughter. That's kind of how I think it's like, you know, I want to make sure that I work hard, and I work my ass off enough to give her whatever she wants. Or to an extent obviously, you got to be apparent, but

Seth Anderson:

is it the money? Or is it something deeper? Like when you think about what does the money provide? Yeah, curity freedom. Like, what? If you go a level deeper, deeper there? What do you what do you find? Well, I

Jordan Walsh:

think you hit the nail on the head, right? It's just that, you know, whatever you you know, it's, I guess, yeah, you're right. You it's that sense of security. It's that able to provide but you know, it all has that one common denominator. Rather, we want to talk about it a lot. It's my right. So let's just I think realize that there's nothing wrong with saying, hey, look, I want to go make a bunch of money. Yeah, don't be greedy. There's someone else being greedy. There's something wrong with stand back or something and do it the wrong way. But if you're a good honest, hard working guy or girl, right, you know, loyal loyalty. Money will come. You like that one?

Seth Anderson:

Yes. So for i We actually did a whole thing on DMX when he passed away. Did you? Yeah, we did. Oh, he was a chopping it up. And I talked about that. And yeah, I think that way back in the day when we were getting to know each other back when we were doing the hockey stuff. And listening to some JP and I were calling him uncle BMX is life lessons. Homes. That's one of them, though, you know, you have loyalty and money on Tom.

Jordan Walsh:

Well, I took that. I mean, you you actually introduced me really to DMX. You were really the first person call me Listen, man. But that line, I mean, I took that seriously. And you know, there's a point in my career, I had three years under my belt TV show the different network. And we had another network that was bigger, come up into Canada and I had to make a decision. Well, first off of my loyal and the network, my loyal to the clients that have gotten me here with this network. And it was the clients because of a number of reasons that we don't need to divulge into. But I kind of said, and I'm not going to mention any names or anything. But like, you know what, I don't know if I want to go with this new network, or if I want to stay where I am, where I am. But I want to make sure that my clients that I've worked with for the last 1000 days are taken care of. So I left it up to a couple of them. They're all American based. So I actually went stuck down in the States. Now with a number of them, every single one of them to a tee wanted me to move, which was tough for me. But again, it's if I'm loyal to these people, the money will come and here we are three years later, and every single one of them still works with me. And every single year we've we've grown that we've grown the money that we've made them and we've grown the money that they've given us, so why LT

Seth Anderson:

money. Okay, so, you mentioned your TV career. I remember again, you're my sister's age, so you're like this little sister's twins. Yeah, this little kid with his hedgehog haircut. There's nothing wrong with that Erica tivity to the day shout out to Walsh's mom for cutting his hair. She still does still does.

Jordan Walsh:

But I think I'm going to transition are they gonna start going to HQ hair salon and Sherwood Park but that that's that's

Seth Anderson:

us. That's another story. So we're rivals and ball hockey.

Jordan Walsh:

Well, I don't know. We're rivals we were

Seth Anderson:

friends.

Jordan Walsh:

Oh, I think I got rivals got to be like there's got to be some competition. Oh, God, you know, come

Seth Anderson:

on. We really have a competition called Sr. and Wyatt. Oh, yeah, no competition. But no problem bringing us on to your team for provincials. No, no, I was great. Anyway. I just think back to this young kid, and he had all these ambitions. One of them was you wanted to be a pilot. Yeah, you wanted to get involved in in hockey at a professional level. And you did a little bit of those things. What did what did you learn through those? It was experiences now with the TV stuff and everything coming up. What's a couple things you took away from that, that you were able to apply now?

Jordan Walsh:

Well, ever since I was like, three, I want to be commercial. I think that's a really great honorable career. But like, you don't make any money until the end, and even so you're, they treat you like cattle. So I realized quick, there's no money in that. And then, you know, with the hockey thing, I for whatever reason, the play by play, I don't give myself a lot of credit, but I thought I was pretty good at that. You know, a lot of people agree with me. So that was I got you on the radio for the first time. Yeah, you did. Well, I mean, I had to solve sponsors, but you add it all up and give me the opportunity. Yeah, remember when

Seth Anderson:

we put out that ad that we were going to be doing it before it was signed off?

Jordan Walsh:

Oh, yeah. Forgot a big meeting with the project or the territory manager?

Seth Anderson:

Yeah.

Jordan Walsh:

I'm notorious for that. I was introduced for that. I always shoot off before I was what I learned I not there. Like I had to do it five or six other times. But I've learned now like, I will not launch something unless it's

Seth Anderson:

100% on there. Yeah. So that was one lesson

Jordan Walsh:

100% Like when we did backwards backstage with Brett like that show like last year? What what? Yeah, last year on April, so 18 months now. We didn't announce we filmed that every we didn't announce we're doing it until like 10 months after I killed gate cuz I got, you know, really good friends of mine in there. We had a blast filming some of the most fun I've ever had. And the productions top notch. Not to mention like there's a little bit as well me it's like, while I'm filming with brackets, Louie is my friend. But people who practice you know what I mean? I wanted to announce it. But we didn't. And I bit my tongue bit my tongue that my tongue.

Seth Anderson:

One of the things you mentioned too, and I think of community, like you've included a lot of your friends on your journey. Now with these TV shows, what is what does that mean to you?

Jordan Walsh:

I think it's very important. And I'll even you know, transition a lot more that into our partners the last 18 months since COVID. But on a friend and family level i Every year I try to include it all in I'm probably getting worse at it. But include friends or include family because at the end of the day, like when I was a kid growing up, I loved hunting, and loved hunting. So that would be what I do for fun while I still and I think hockey probably taught me that because hockey was fun, too. But when I started working in hockey, then you know going on semi pro and not not playing but announcing and sales. It sucked the fun rate out of it like yeah, I hated hockey. So when I took that step back and got lucky enough to transition, I just kind of was able to recognize that feeling or that, you know, sense of negativity towards something you love. And this doesn't just have to apply to me in this instance, some you know, everybody else can relate to this. Like, if something that you really enjoys is not fun anymore. Figure that out, because you don't want to lose, you don't want to lose that. But I was able to identify that and avoid it like the plague with the hunting stuff. And that's one of the ways that that I do that. It's okay. Yeah, you know, we can travel all around the world and go to Africa and New Zealand and Spain. And that's awesome. Don't get me wrong. Like it's, it's a lot of hard work with filming, but it's still a vacation. But at the end of the day, I like to go back to a night every year not with my family and my friends because that's what I grew up loving. That's why I fell in love with this called a pastime. I like to call on team sport. But remind yourself of that and turn all that work and all that stuff off at least a couple times a year. So that's kind of my rule of thumb. And that's why I do what I do. But it's also very special for me to you know, go back and hunt with my family or in earlier years on the show guys like Scott McCloskey who you know and Steven white and husband, Derek, Derek Pfister has been on has been on the

Seth Anderson:

The Biz Dojo,

Jordan Walsh:

The Biz Dojo, a little bit on the TV show, too. Yeah, that's funny. Not is, but that's what it's all about. Right.

Seth Anderson:

Well, that's what you know, we've been trying to do with the dojo too, is you know, we've had some really cool guests sort of one time Jordan Walsh, even and then Jordan now. We've been you know, we have tried to keep a family friends roots to like, you know, JP sister in law, Val Sweeting. The curler Yeah, we've had childhood friends we've had lots of people are waiting right now. Yeah. Shawn, Jeremy, while Irma, Irma guy so I think it's been it's part of what makes it fun when you can include the people that you care about in what you're doing.

Jordan Walsh:

Well, everybody's got a different story, right? Being in business, be in life, be it whatever and varying levels of successful at the end of the day, everybody's got something that they can teach somebody else. I don't care who you are. So it's interesting to see and for me, like just real quick. I had a good eye opener earlier this year where we launched our show with Brett and you know, one of the one of the shows me with our other friend there, Jordan Everly, we went out on a whitetail hunt. Last three harvested some really good whitetail bucks, you know, fully guided place in Saskatchewan was back in Wainwright and you know, I went into the local hardware store and an older guy that always watches my shows is there. He's like, Yeah, I watched that show with you and Breton that Everly and I'm like, oh, yeah, you like it? Because there's like, probably my favorite show that I've ever done. He's like, No, I'm like, oh, like, I can't relate to it. He's like, I can't you know I'm not going on with your Neverland record school and I'm not going to Saskatchewan on a paid wait till on so it really didn't have any form. Like I like when you're with your grandpa on the back 40 around, you end in or Wainwright or hardest year, whatever the case may be. So we actually dive into it like 60 to 70%. And 99% of statistics are made up of a spot. But somewhere in that ballpark of people somewhere in this made up statistic, but literally the data is there, I just don't have the exact number, want to watch or listen to something that they can relate to. And then there's the other 30% of people that want to live vicariously through it. So you got to find that balance, no matter what kind of content you're creating, you've got to give people two thirds of what they can relate to, but that 1/3 that they can be like, You know what, I might never get to go to New Zealand on a red stag hunt. But I'm gonna watch a whole bunch of these episodes because it looks freakin awesome. And that's like astute, right?

JP Gaston:

And I think not just that but because they're relating to the two thirds they're like, Well, hell if this guy can go on a hunt with his grandpa in the backwoods of ama ever lay Yeah, I can't

Jordan Walsh:

100% 100% agree.

Seth Anderson:

I have my fantasy hockey draft on the weekend. And I actually picked up Everly with the one of the last show. Please love and he was available. So I think he's gonna do all these great human

Jordan Walsh:

eyes. He's one of those guys that he is as good as you like as a human. He's guys.

Seth Anderson:

He seems like an awesome dude. I stood in line behind him at an ice cream shop in Auburn Bay. And my kids were running ice cream. There's

Jordan Walsh:

another business that's another garden too. Yeah, we just bought another ice cream truck. We've got a few now. I thought

Seth Anderson:

Shawn was a serial entrepreneur, but you might give him a run for his money. Yeah, well, maybe

Jordan Walsh:

you don't Milty I do. Yeah, we had him on. He's my uncle's agent.

JP Gaston:

They have a business.

Seth Anderson:

We graduate him and I graduated the same okay.

Jordan Walsh:

He's not he's really under the brand. Yeah, yeah. I knew who he was his dad nori was firefighter with my grandpa Dennis. Right there. The scene they were Pfeiffer together for like 15 years. So Ice cream? Ice cream.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, that's adventure. Everybody loves ice cream?

Jordan Walsh:

I think so. I mean, our little label stuff, Alberta Health Services, because they really delayed us this year. We didn't get off to the Running Start that we probably would have liked. But we did it right. And you know, we

Seth Anderson:

might have to sell in the winter months. Like you probably wanted though.

Jordan Walsh:

Yeah, we would very much like those summer months, especially with COVID. And everything. Food trucks were a hot commodity this year. And I mean, we only got to operate for the final five or so weeks, and we still managed to turn a profit. So it's like, okay, if we would have had the other 10 weeks I would have been that would have been awesome, you know, but we didn't and that's just out of your adult. So you play it. And you know what, at the end of the day, we've got three trucks now, number of bikes in spruce Grove, Stony Plain area. And as much as maybe we lost money this year, because again, five weeks to jump through the IHS hurdles, and we were able to work out a lot of the kinks. So like next year, we're going to hit the ground running. But we started like I said, an ice cream business and the Parkland county area and you know, we're really excited and proud of it.

JP Gaston:

You know, it gets me every winter is the candy cane crackle ice cream that they have it like yeah, Candy Cane crackers, like candy cane and chocolate dices mixed into like a vanilla. So the candy canes actually melt like a little bit and you get like this minty vanilla. It's it is like the greatest thing about winter where the hell is this? Not so I'm from Ontario. I used to get it at Zehrs which I believe is all like PC products. So I think you can get it at like superstore and no frills and no sauces. It's candy cane crackle, it is just taking crack, basically. Yes. Nice. Exactly.

Seth Anderson:

So Jordan, what's next for you?

Jordan Walsh:

Well, I'm jumping on a plane tomorrow morning going to Colorado to catch the avalanche home opener because that team's very near and dear to my heart and they broke it last year. So I'm hoping they can repair it this year. But from a business perspective, it's kind of our busy time of the year. I mean, kind of divide my year into segments in this segment is ball which is hunting season. So we're out filming and hunting and driving all over the country and that guy just picked up a new shaft from Shreveport shove, and I've had it for six weeks, I've already got 1,000k on it. We've been in northern Alberta, elk, moose, you name it, and the next six weeks is going to be all focused on whitetail deer throughout Alberta and Saskatchewan. So it is the fun part of the year. You know, we're not in meetings, we're not, you know, flying to the states a whole bunch for work, but as much as it's fun it is it is it is a task and you know what, hey, like I said, get outdoors if nobody's ever tried hunting or whatever I encourage you to do and maybe not even hunting, just get outdoors and and you know, go spend it spend a weekend camping you'll you'll find a sense of rejuvenation that I think it'd be thankful for. And that would be my message, I guess,

Seth Anderson:

I guess last question, and we'll get you out of here. What are you doing for personal development? How are you? How are you feeding your mind lately?

Jordan Walsh:

Really trying to be more present in the moment? I find that with working from home and always you know, email, email, text text, I'm stuck to my phone. So rather it's I'm working on this with my, with my psychologist right now, and you're really taking mental notes, and when I find that I am more present in a situation, when I'm at home playing with my daughter, a lot of times I'll play and then I'll text I'll play, I'll text I'll play, I'll text. Now, don't ever get a sense of enjoyment out of playing with my daughter, because I'm always working. As much as fun as my job, maybe it's the worst. So I'm really trying to get rid of the phone, get rid of the computer and just be present, even if it's, you know, obviously, with my daughter situation I want to be and maybe it's situation, I don't want to be in, like, start spending much time with Seth and JP, just be present, take those mental notes, and I'm getting a course but take those mental notes in that situation and just exist. So there's a lot of reward there have been focused on that for a number of weeks now. But I still got a lot of room to grow in that department.

JP Gaston:

I mean, I think the other thing is, be aware. Be aware that the episode still needs to be edited. And I post a whatever. The next couple of days, JP has

Jordan Walsh:

an amazing airline. It's fantastic.

JP Gaston:

It's so amazing. It's running backwards over my head.

Jordan Walsh:

Well, thanks for having me on guys. I really do appreciate it. And I'm definitely on my way through atrium and stop and grab a Dairy Queen, the blizzard that you fill me in on how great those guys are to work with. And I love Blizzard so hell yeah,

Seth Anderson:

awesome. three locations in Airdrie even the head of all 301

JP Gaston:

for a blizzard stuff at one for some fries stuff and another don't get the combo just get one.

Jordan Walsh:

Well actually know how to go over another 100 cages to break even on my calorie intake from your genius plan but a

Seth Anderson:

shout out to Trent in the DQ airdry team. Awesome. Thanks for coming to the dojo first guest

Jordan Walsh:

it worked out great. And I mean, thanks for having me. It's always enjoyable and obviously SAS great to great excuse to come down and you know.

JP Gaston:

Thanks. Thanks for joining us today for our conversation with Jordan. We'd love it. If you'd hit subscribe, leave a rating or review and continue the conversation with us on our social media channels or on LinkedIn, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, you know, social media. And as always, if you'd like to learn more about what coaching could do for you, connect with us for a free discovery session, no obligation, just send an email to coaching at the biz dojo.com