The Biz Dojo

S3E16 - A game within a game: Tackling physical wellness w/Pat Woodcock

November 23, 2021 Pat Woodcock Season 3 Episode 16
The Biz Dojo
S3E16 - A game within a game: Tackling physical wellness w/Pat Woodcock
Show Notes Transcript

This week in The Biz Dojo, we chat with Pat Woodcock (IG: @elitecoach). Pat is a former NFL and CFL player, and now focuses on helping others with their physical wellness with Elite Man Method. 

We'll talk a bit about his football career, and how that parlayed into becoming a trainer and entrepreneur. We get into some of the roadblocks most of us face when trying to improve our physical wellness, and what can help us overcome these mental hurdles to a better life for ourselves. 

So get off the couch, grab your cup of  Biz Dojo Coffee (Masters Medium - OR - Dojo Dark), and listen on your way to the gym! or at the gym! or on a walk! . 

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JP Gaston:

So a couple of years ago, I was given a gym membership for Christmas holiday season upcoming I thought who tell this to

Seth Anderson:

give someone a gym membership. That's it. Well,

JP Gaston:

it wasn't like a Santa Fe. Here's, here's a head. No, it was. So Westside REC is a pretty cool facility. They've got a wave pool and Olympic pool and a water slide and a bunch of gyms a rock climbing wall, like it's it's a pretty cool facility. It's not just a gym.

Seth Anderson:

Do they have a rock climbing wall overtop of like a water feature? That would be cool.

JP Gaston:

You know, where does have that is the YMCA in Rocky Ridge. Oh, really? A water based rock climbing wall that you can climb up and you can fall into the water from Yeah, it's pretty quick.

Seth Anderson:

My kid would like that. Yes.

JP Gaston:

I told you to go there the other day. It is a site wreck membership. And I did want to use it for like fitness. Like the whole purpose of me getting it was well, the side benefit generally is cool, you know? Yeah. Gym fitness go together actually. Like, like pb&j if you will. And I'm pretty sure I used it once. That six month window. And it's one of those things that like you can activate at any time. But once you activate it, you got six months. So I went that one time, I think I got a little bit busy and I like I was working out at home but I wasn't really getting my time into the gym. And then after a couple months, it was just like, I totally forgot about it until I came across it in my wallet. I went oh, I remember that gym from six months and three days ago.

Seth Anderson:

It's funny how that those kinds of things tend to work out. I had a similar experience recently where on my Apple TV, it popped up that my masterclass subscription was ending soon. And so last year, I guess would have been around this time or early December. I was like, masterclass, this is awesome. I didn't remember telling you about it. I'm like, we should split a membership. And you're like,

JP Gaston:

yes, six months.

Seth Anderson:

I get 50% off and then we split it two ways. And then that's another 50% off, like what to do, we should do it. And I had all these grand ambitions of like watching Masterclass every night. And I don't think I turned it on. For eight out of the 12 months.

JP Gaston:

Those first four months were the ones where you turned it on.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, well, that's probably generous. It was probably more like a couple it was like over Christmas break. I watched like four of them. Okay, I was like right into it. And then you know, life happens. And then it's like, oh, man, I had this amazing access to all these great speakers and all this amazing information. And I did not use it.

JP Gaston:

You see You didn't Chef Ramsay it up and you're not cooking? Amazing?

Seth Anderson:

No, although there's one with Metallica right now that I am watching. And I'm gonna watch it here and there. But I just feel like Man, if I would have just watched this for like an hour a night, for the last year, have we got through like the whole thing instead of watching like, I don't know, training days, the other morning,

JP Gaston:

you would have been, you would have become the first master of all trades, I could

Seth Anderson:

have been a master of all the classes. So now maybe I'll set that goal for next year. But it is interesting. Like when you you kind of, you know, to that point you like you get all excited about something you go a couple of times or you do it a few times, and then it just kind of doesn't stick. And I think I think that's a lot of people's experience, both with physical and mental wellness.

JP Gaston:

It took some pretty serious dedication for the first few weeks for me to get into a routine on the physical wellness front. And once I did like now it's just it's just a part of my like anything else. It's just a part of my day, right? It's just a thing that I do usually around the same time like I needed to figure out a way to stick it as a routine, rather than this extra thing that I do on top of my normal day.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, yeah. And that that's so leading to our guest this week. Pat Woodcock and working his program like I went from. I think all of us went from not going to the gym for two years more or less, to somewhere between eight to 10 hours of my week going to like physically driving back and forth from the gym just based on how far it is from my house. And then you know, putting in these workouts like I didn't think I had time for those things, but once I made the time for them was there?

JP Gaston:

Yeah, it's that's a, we've had this conversation recently, too. It's amazing how you feel like you don't have time, and then something has a certain level of importance to you. And all the sudden, you have the time. Time exists, it's just a question of what you're going to dedicate it to.

Seth Anderson:

Well, what are your priorities? Right? I mean, if you sit down or you know, I think a lot of times we say, you know, families are priority health is a priority, but it is your is your energy and effort actually going to those things. And that was an awakening for me over, you know, we'll just say over the last couple of years, you know, family is important to me. COVID provided an opportunity to be closer to my family, and now I'm able to, you know, spend more time with them and align what I say my priorities are to my actual time and energy. Same thing with physical wellness, mental wellness, whatever. And I think if you kind of take stock and what was that tool that we used in the Maslow course? Oh, yeah, the wheel of life? Yeah. Tell the people about the wheel of life?

JP Gaston:

Well, it's just a way for you to understand that in the moment. So it's, it's not like a historical snapshot. It's not a future snapshot. It's in the moment how you are feeling about different aspects of your life. And it's a really good way to like baseline to figure out, where am I at right now? Right before a change, and then make your change? And then do it again and see, Did I did I achieve the things I wanted to achieve? Or did it have an impact on my life in the way that I wanted it have an impact, but it's just a, it's basically a rating of one to 10 of like, my finances, my health, my mental wellness, my job, my family time, my career aspirations? Like, all of those sorts of things feed into it. Yeah,

Seth Anderson:

it's a pretty cool exercise, actually. Yeah, and I know,

JP Gaston:

there's been a few people who have reached out so if you want to learn more about the wheel of life, or how it can impact your life, certainly reach out to us coaching at the biz dojo.com Happy to have a conversation or JP at the biz dojo.com or Seth at the biz dojo.com.

Seth Anderson:

And really, anything at the biz dojo.com

JP Gaston:

Yeah, yeah, you can type your own name at the biz dojo.com and we'll get it don't worry.

Seth Anderson:

All right, let's hop into this week's conversation with Pat Woodcock. Well, welcome to the dojo Pat, pleasure to have you in today. So for those of you listening, you may know Pat as a former NFL and CFL player. And currently I know you're running a program. I know because I'm in it, the elite man method. And it's long as some of the cool things you do. But I thought maybe we'd start with like, like, who is Pat woodcock, you know, when you kind of get past what you do? You know, who are you? Well,

Pat Woodcock:

I would say first and foremost, I'm a husband and a father, I have my amazing wife, who we've been we've been together since high school. And then for kids aged 1412, eight and six. So busy guy. And then you know, from there? Yeah, I mean, I'm a coach. I'm a former athlete, a businessman, I'm a little bit of, you know, a bunch of different things, I guess. And ultimately, all those things are just a product of, you know, the coaches and my parents and everybody who's kind of helped me

Seth Anderson:

get to this point. That's awesome. I think resonates with JP and I, we've recently started calling ourselves coaches. Yeah, okay. It's such a broad space. I mean, coaches kind of show up all over our life. And I think you're associated to sports, right? I mean, obviously, you're an athlete, you're, you know, you grow up with it, you've probably had some amazing coaches along the way. When you kind of think about it, though, like, is there been some coaches in your life that have played a really, you know, integral role to help get you where you are?

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, I think I didn't view them that way at the time, but when you look back on it with kind of that frame around it, then definitely, I had some guys who, you know, were mentors and people that I look to and, and who guided me to, you know, kind of do different things. Certainly, in high school, I had, there was a guy who was, you know, had played before me for some of the teams that I played for, and was kind of integral in showing me what life after sports could look like, and would transition into business and those kinds of things. I did have a strength coach who helped me along the business side as well, who showed me, you know, how to do things and how to make that transition afterwards. And then, you know, certainly my both my parents and, and, and my extended family showed me what, at least gave me an idea of how to be a father. I mean, that's always a learning process for everybody. But, but I think that that's an important piece to see, to see how you're supposed to interact with kids and how you're supposed to show love and all those kinds of things because that's, that can be different in different scenarios. And I think those things were important for me To see to then be able to, to bring to my family as well,

JP Gaston:

when you're a high level athlete, how much are you thinking of life after sport, I mean, I've played sports my whole life, but I would never put my like, I were to wear a baseball glove and played net for my brother. And I was just the most amazing goalie in that league. But aside from that, I would never put myself in the elite athlete territory. So I just like, I'm wondering how much of your life was preparing for life after sport? And how much was just the drive for sport?

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, I would say definitely, you know, in kind of the college and early pro years, like you never think about that, at least I didn't. Everything was about right now, and being the best that could be right now or at the following season or whatever. But when you know, I was lucky enough to have an eight year career. So that's pretty long for a football player. So you kind of get to the second half of that. And now you're starting to say okay, so I probably am not going to play for another 10 years. So what am I gonna do in next year or two years or three years down the road? And so then yeah, then you kind of look at the opportunities that are there that you things that you do in the offseason, or things you enjoy or opportunities that are presenting themselves, while you're still playing that you can potentially capitalize on when you when you finish and move into. But yeah, really, that doesn't, that doesn't really come into play until the last few at least it didn't for me, maybe it's a little bit different for other guys, for sure. But I was very much kind of one track minded. Now that

JP Gaston:

I've said it out loud. It actually made me think, I don't know how much people plan a couple of years out when they aren't. True. It's

Pat Woodcock:

a little I would say it's a little bit different though in athletics, because you know that that's a career that nine times out of 10, you're going to be retiring much earlier than anybody else. Right? Like, you're going to be retiring in your 30s. If you're lucky, maybe 40s If you're an outlier, but But yeah, it's a much earlier transition than most people. Right. So that is something that we probably should spend more time planning for earlier on. But But yeah, for me, it was it was definitely a later and later kind of end of the game sort of thing.

Seth Anderson:

Do you think that's evolving or changing with sort of the the landscape these days, I just think about, you know, a lot of people getting into personal development, you know, even some of the work you're doing with elite man method, like that's something you could technically do while you're still playing now, you know, podcasting, media, etc. It's changed a little bit since since he retired,

Pat Woodcock:

I think, absolutely, I think there's a lot more opportunities for guys while they're still playing, like you said, to capitalize upon what they're doing and the platform that they have. The really wasn't. So I'm old enough that they really want my social media, when I certainly when I started. There's a little bit more when I finished but you know, there, if you were in the city that I was playing in, you weren't really a part of my audience, right? You weren't going to hear me talk or you weren't going to see me or whatever. And that's obviously much different now guys can have reach all over the world. And like you said, Do it while they're still playing, and in all likelihood, they should because that's when their profile is

Seth Anderson:

highest. Just something that popped into my head. What's your proudest moment? I mean, I'm sure you could probably conjure up a few but I'm curious very where you go with that. So my best sports moment, no proudest moment, period. Oh, proudest moment, period.

Pat Woodcock:

Ooh, that's definitely a tough one. From certainly from a personal point of view, the day I got married, and the birth of my four kids are days that can't be matched by anything. For sure. And then from a sports point of view, there's been a few obviously, you know, the day I got my scholarship and the day I signed my first pro contract and the day I won the Grey Cup as a player I think those are all pretty, pretty high level ones. If I had if I had to pick one I'd probably have to say the Grey Cup winning one when I was a player just because that was a day that I dreamed about a little kid right? You watch the Grey Cup game growing up and put yourself in that scenario as a 1011 12 year old and play that out in the backyard and all that kind of stuff and so to be able to to achieve it and have it come to fruition was was pretty awesome.

Seth Anderson:

That's cool. I had a feeling you go the family route overall, which I mean it's so relatable Right? Like even you know the Grey Cup and everything amazing but but it's in the

Pat Woodcock:

past now. Yeah, it's in the past and it's a great memory but really that's all it is whereas you know families families still everything right family will be everything and and that's and that's ultimately the legacy right? Yeah football player picture on the wall name on the great cup, but nobody really cares legacies family and the kids and where they go and all that kind of stuff. Not

Seth Anderson:

only did you win the Grey Cup, though you also had at the time the longest return in history and I'm just curious what's going through your mind you're in the Grey Cup you're running through everybody like what do you what's Pat Woodcock thinking in those moments?

Pat Woodcock:

But literally while I'm running Yeah, nothing just just run don't get caught. Where's he coming from? You know, just trying to get to the end zone before he before he catches up. So yeah, literally nothing going through your head in the actual moment. But the game itself you I mean, we were very much in the zone that year, like we were a very good team. And we had made plays like that kind of all year long and, and that had kind of been my coming out party in terms of having long touchdowns throughout the year. So I felt pretty comfortable thinking that I would have an opportunity to do that in the game. And, and now, obviously, when it happened, you know, I didn't know it was a record until I got to the sideline, and somebody came in told me that it was the record. And that was cool. But we're still in the middle of the game. So I really wanted to focus on one of the one of the games. But yeah, pretty much man like it's, it's, that's the life of an athlete, at least when you're trying to be successful is whether it's good or bad. Like you got to forget that one and move on to the next one. Because feeling you're too bad whether it was a good one or a bad one. You linger too bad on that old one. You're not going to play on

JP Gaston:

the next one. So yeah, it's almost like this even keel thing like never let yourself get too high. Never let yourself get too low. Just try and manage the emotion, at least until you're holding a giant Grey Cup over your

Pat Woodcock:

head. whistle blows Yeah, exactly.

Seth Anderson:

So as part of your journey, how difficult or you know, was anything come to mind and what you underestimated when it came to making that transition from playing to regular life?

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, the biggest one for me, honestly, was the kind of the no offseason, right? Because I my whole life had been based around a season and an offseason. And even in the worst seasons, you can kind of say, alright, so if I just suck it up for three more weeks, and the season's over and I get a break. Oh, you don't get a break with regular life, right? Yes, you may go on vacation for a little bit. But business is a all the time thing. And family is an all the time thing. There is no offseason per se and so having been, you know, kind of eight years Pro for years college and all that kind of stuff. It was very much part of my kind of internal calendar, I guess that there's going to be an offseason coming up. And that was the first couple years when I was trying to start the gym and get business rolling. And all that kind of stuff was was challenging at times just just from that aspect of the the constancy, the the like, it never stops, there's always something there's always something there's no break. That was that was the biggest one. For me.

JP Gaston:

This is a weird correlation. But when they talk about people coming out of prison, they talk about being institutionalized. Does it feel a little bit when you come out? Like you've been kind of institutionalized?

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, to a certain extent for sure. Because I mean, a lot of it is, it's dictated to you right? Like this is your like, this day, you have to be here, and you have to do this. And you have to do that. And you don't really have a choice if you want to continue playing and stuff like that. So you get a little bit of a break from that in the offseason, obviously. But yeah, it's very much you know, you have a built in routine and you have kind of these schedules that you follow. And it just becomes second nature to you. And so when you come out of that, and you don't have somebody creating a schedule for you and dictating where you need to be. It's there's there's definitely an adjustment process to figuring that out for yourself and how that's going to work best for you. Why

JP Gaston:

am I eating it too, and napping at 3am

Seth Anderson:

every day. It's interesting, like, the whole offseason thing and it harkens me back to the days I used to GM and coach, Junior B hockey team. And what I loved about it was obviously the competition the building that all the connections you make, but playing for something right? Like you knew you got this six month Tomlin ahead of you, you're playing for a championship and you got to put all of your energy into it. And you know, unfortunately, in my experience, we always kind of came up short. But that's a tough thing to apply in business day in and day out. Because you don't necessarily always have that Stanley Cup waiting for you. Like, sometimes it's the grind. Right? And, and how do you like, what, what what did you learn? Like, how did you learn to get up for business every day, without that, like cop at the end of it. So

Pat Woodcock:

I mean, I think part of it is planning and goal setting. And so you know, having an idea of obviously, where you want business to be, whether it's more clients, or more money, or better service or whatever, and kind of setting those small term goals. So there's your little mini Grey Cup, you know, like this quarter, I'm going to work on this, and I want to nail this down. And so I got, you know, three solid months to attack this. This is my season right now, at the end, you know, hopefully I'm gonna have that cup, have that championship achieve that goal. Do a little celebration, and then you know, maybe do it again, the next one. Definitely not easy because like you said, it's, it's, there's just a constancy to it. But you have to kind of create a game within a game sort of thing, right? So, find those little things that you can create trophies for yourself. Something to work for in the shorter term, to keep the focus and keep the fire lit. And then you find another one to go after for the next one. Because if you just get boring, boring, same stuff, same stuff, same stuff like that tunes anybody off pretty fast.

Seth Anderson:

A game within a game I love that's a great soundbite so maybe just diving into what what inspired you to Get into the personal development business. And we'll talk a little bit about my experience in your program. But what what led you to this store.

Pat Woodcock:

So when I finished playing, it was always in my head that I was going to train other athletes, and whether it was pro athletes or younger athletes to bring them up and help them achieve some of the same things that I did. And, and that's where I started open the facility kind of within a year or two after I finished playing and was working with young athletes and university athletes. And eventually, we got to some pros and all that kind of stuff. And I had a year in 2016, where I was a strength coach for the RedBlacks here in Ottawa, and, and won a Grey Cup with them. So I kind of did all those things on the athletic side. And then right around that time, because of partly because of the RedBlacks job and business, I got more out of shape than I had ever been before, and didn't like the way I felt and all that kind of stuff. So didn't go back for a second year with the RedBlacks still had to do business. So wanted to get myself back into the shape that I was used to being in. And it wasn't as easy as it used to be. Right, I was around 40. I was family and business and lots of obligations, and the body just doesn't respond the way it used to. So it wasn't just a simply as simple as, hey, I'm just gonna go back to the gym workout the way I always have. And, you know, eventually I'll get back to where it was It wasn't happy. So took some more research had to find out why and how come now that I'm 40 I can't train the way I did when I was 25 and all those things. And when I finally figured it out, got myself back to where I want to be I was like there's got to be my friends and colleagues and guys like me, who are struggling with same thing. And right around that time I had a client who, as part of a business promotion with his clients wanted to bring them to the gym as part of a, you know, a training session that was his gift to his clients. And so it was a quick transition to you know, here's a group of 4040 45 year old guys coming in struggling with same things that I had just been struggling. So it was a way to kind of put what worked on me into practice on other guys see the results, see how happy they were with feeling better, looking better, carrying themselves with more confidence. And I was like, Well, I got I got to share this with other guys, this is you know, I've trained athletes, and I've gotten those 10 results. But these guys are, these guys are happy. Now these guys are feeling better about life. And they're better dads and a better businessman, and they're doing better with their overall life. So this is something that I need to put together and kind of allow other guys to have that same feeling

JP Gaston:

apart is it to cut through the noise in that space. Like I feel like in in the wellness space, there's a lot of noise of people promising things. Like, clearly you're getting results for yourself and for your clients. And like there's a there's a path. And there's a lot of people like that. There's also a lot of people who are just promoting stuff to make some money. Yeah. And they say all the right things like how is it really hard to cut through that noise?

Pat Woodcock:

I would say it's, it's tough for the uneducated, and it's tough for the desperate. So the uneducated just don't know the difference, right? They don't know the difference between this program and this program, you said this, he said this, what's the difference? And that so there's a process there in terms of trying to show what the difference is, and that kind of stuff. And then the desperate grasping for anything and usually grasping, like trying to find a magic pill. And when you tell them, there's no magic pill, they don't want to talk to you anymore. They want the magic pill. So they're getting to talk to somebody else. So yeah, you know, there's there's, there's always going to be that issue. Can I let me I think it's similar in a lot of different industries. But it's, it's obviously very prevalent in this one, I think, because there is so much of that desperation factor for there's somebody who have tried so many different things, and nothing seems to work and why can't it work for me and, and so they're just they tend to try to latch on to what's going to be the easiest, when in reality, they need to go the other way. And find the thing that's not going to be the easiest, but it's going to give you some results in the long term.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, well, and there's lots of magic pills, right, like, in our space for coaching. Yeah, there's not a lot of there's not a lot of magic pills for dealing with some of the stuff we coach. When it comes to physical health. There's like everything is a fat burner. Yeah, everything burns fat. Doesn't matter what it is. Yeah. Have this bacon diet, I promise totally.

Pat Woodcock:

Perfectly healthy for you.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, it's interesting, because, you know, but uh, you know, my journey, and I'd shared this with you when we first met. And I think what attracted me to working with you was you you just seem to legit, it's like this guy played in the NFL, CFL, he, you've got it. So you've got that legitimacy with you. And I'm like, Okay. And what I loved also was just the pairing of the nutrition and, and the exercise, which was something I was looking for. And it was very no pressure. Like he never made it feel pressured. It was just like, Hey, dude, I think I can help you. And so that's very much your approach. And I think where I was at, is I knew something was missing. Right? Like I had lost the better part of 100 pounds and You know, I felt as good as I'd felt when you lose that amount of weight. But it had all been like cardio based, and not necessarily through eating better just eating less of thing. So you know, quitting drinking and stopping eating red meat. I don't know, like, obviously, there's some benefits to both of those things to some degree, but like, I didn't have a nutritional plan, I didn't know how to measure food, or how much of what to eat. So like, I knew something was missing. You, you had like a pretty, I'm gonna say basic solution, like not basic, but very straightforward, very understandable. It wasn't complicated. It's like, you know, here's how you kind of do this. And what I learned, I mean, I learned a lot of things like a going to the gym, and just that consistent routine makes a huge difference for mental health, which I think I already knew, but probably forgot over COVID A little bit. But the second thing, the one thing I really want to hit on his like, I did a ton of cardio that was like, the main thing I did to lose my weight, a lot of hit workouts, a lot of running a lot of, you know, that kind of stuff. And I'm not saying there's anything wrong with that, but like, I did not build up my strength. And that has been such a game changer. Going through your program and building up the strength of my body, I feel like a different person.

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, absolutely. There's, there's very different ways that that weight training benefits. And there's, there's physical ways, and there's mental ways, and there's kind of emotional ways to in my opinion, you know, obviously, physically, like you said, you're going to build up stronger muscles, you're going to be able to do things better, you're going to probably move a little bit better. And there's a hormone response there too, especially when you get into our age group, you know, we're going to get a little boost of testosterone and growth hormone that kind of stuff. Mentally to though, you know, when you lift 100 pounds for the first time, like, that's cool, like, that's an achievement, like, that's something I've never done before. And then when you go 250 pounds, 200 pounds, like that's a, that's a physical thing that you've done that you've like, doesn't take anything other than hard work, right? It doesn't take a special skill, it doesn't take, you know, somebody to give you good luck, it doesn't take somebody else's contribution, all you have to do is show up and push the weight every day. And eventually you get stronger and you achieve these things. So that's pretty cool. And then too, I think those things together, just creates a confidence, like you carry yourself a little differently when you can do that stuff. When you've changed your body, when you've lifted a weight that you've never done before. When you've achieved things like that physically. It creates a mindset and a feeling and a confidence that, you know, you just walk into a room different, you carry yourself different and you approach business different and new approach everything different, right, you just have a little bit more confidence and a little more swagger. And just, in my opinion, there's nothing that matches, you know, the feeling of achieving something physical like that. Like there's business achievements, and those things are awesome. But a lot of times those are contributions from other people, right? You can't do this stuff a lot by yourself. There's, there's luck involved, and there's all those kinds of things. But that is just pure effort and consistency, and drive and want to and when you get those things rolling, and then you achieve, like, That's cool, man. And, like, I don't think there's anything that matches that.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah. And I just, I gotta say thank you, because like, I would have never known that had I not? Like, I thought that I had kind of figured out most of this stuff. And you know, if anything, it just realized that every time you think you've figured everything out, you probably haven't even you don't even know. Like, I don't even know what I don't know, right now. And yeah, you know, I think of the little things like I never would have went and dead lifted something I never could mainly cuz I didn't know how and I didn't want to hurt myself and I didn't want to look like an idiot. But like three year program, it's like the first day, I got to learn how to deadlift shit. And it's like, what I love about it, it's got the simple video to break down, I just followed it, get to know it, you know, do light weights, figure it out. But like, I literally never would have done that in my life if it wasn't, you know, for your program. And I think I'm, you know, kind of like an every man like all these things I thought I couldn't do.

Pat Woodcock:

Turns out I can write, I think it's you know, it's so easy to get caught up in just the routine of life, right? So, you know, if you're not a regular gym guy, and you know, you have kids and you go to work and you do this and maybe you do some cardio, go for a jog a couple times a week and that kind of stuff. And then that becomes the routine and you just think, Okay, well this is it now, like right on 40 This is what I'm going to do. I'm going to jog maybe we're gonna play golf. Maybe I'll play pickup hockey once or twice a week. And that's that's just the routine. And it really doesn't have to be if you don't want it to be right if you love doing that stuff like awesome. But if you're if you want to see change, or you want to try something different, like there's no reason why you can't. I think a lot of times guys are hesitant to ask for help. Right? We always want to figure stuff out on our own or, or like you said, just not do it because I don't want to look like an idiot. So there's nothing wrong with asking for help. Talking about coaches already, there's nothing wrong with having a coach in different areas of your life. Right? Like, I have a business coach, I have a, I have coaches that I talked to about my training to make sure that I'm keeping myself on track and that kind of stuff. And there's, there's nothing wrong with having a support group and trying different things and pushing yourself to do different things. In fact, it is probably better for us, right? We don't want to get caught up in those static routines all the time. Because you just start to die a little bit, doing the same thing over and over again, all the time. You keep challenging yourself, and you keep creating new opportunities and new experiences. And I mean, that's what makes life exciting. And for me, too, like, I think, when I try new things, it helps me to understand how my kids feel when they're trying new things for the first time. And so I, as much as I'm a creature of habit, and I just do the same thing over and over again, I keep pushing myself to try some different stuff and, and do different things and make sure that I'm keeping on top of that kind of stuff so that I can help them when it comes up for them as well.

JP Gaston:

I don't know, Pat, I think there is something wrong with people who like jobs

Pat Woodcock:

100%. But that was a whole different conversation. In high school, I quit the 200 meters because it was too far.

JP Gaston:

It was it was 100 meters too far.

Pat Woodcock:

Strictly under gay

Seth Anderson:

love, just jam on that point about kids there because I think that so my first motivator was yeah, I wanted to feel better. Second motivator was more on the nutrition side. And it was about learning, learning about it, cuz I just, you know, again, you can go online, there's information everywhere, but like, none of it was real to me. And I, you know, I'm a kid, like probably many of my generation grew up on macaroni and hotdogs and noodles. And you know, that old chestnut. And, you know, you get into adulthood, and I remember a day where it would be nothing to go down to 711 and eat 40 kilos a bag of Doritos and wash it down with a big gulp and like not think anything of it. Yeah. And I don't, you know, again, my kids are gonna have to figure out their lives and do whatever. But as much as I can, I wanted to figure out okay, what does good look like when it comes to eating? Yeah, and how can I start to influence that on them so that they don't repeat this cycle that I went through? Sure. And that has been such a huge learning for me just like portion sizes. And you know, what are the good things to put in your body? What motivated you to add the nutritional part, because I'm sure like with this business, you could have just done the physical part, but you intentionally added the nutrition part. Yeah, cuz

Pat Woodcock:

because I want I want guys to get results. And and I want it to be lasting results. So you know, you hear me say all the time, like, there's going to be seasons in the year where you're on track all the time, and everything is perfect. And then there's going to be seasons where you're too busy, or there's a family event or something and things fall off track. And that's gonna happen more often with training and just not being able to get to the gym consistently, and that kind of stuff. But if you can consistently eat well, and at least have a knowledge of the effects of all the effects of the food that you eat on your body, when you're doing it, then that can hold you over when you're in those downtimes. And you can't train as much. And it has a, you know, an overall impact, obviously, in terms of health and longevity, and aging, well, and focus and concentrate, like all that stuff is affected by the foods that we eat. And so you're just not going to get the same result, I can give you the best training plan in the world. But if you continue to eat the same way you've always eaten, you might get stronger, and all that kind of stuff, but you're not really gonna be healthy. And certainly, it's not going to be something that you're going to pass on to your kids or whatever. Because that they're not going to grow as well, they're not going to learn as well, when they're teenagers, they're, you know, their hormones are going to be affected by it, you know, there's so much stuff that's affected by nutrition. And it was a no brainer to include that if I really wanted to have people have positive change that was going to be lasting in the long term, I have no interest in helping guys, you know, lose 25 pounds, and then they gain it all back. As soon as we stop working together like that. Amazed. Well, I'm not done, right. That's not That's not what I'm in the game for. And so the nutrition just has to be part of the package. And I mean, you know, Seth, the way I do it, like I don't just I don't give you a meal plan and say Here, eat this, because that doesn't teach you anything. And so when we finished whatever length of time we're going to be together, you still don't know what the different foods do, you just ate what I told you to eat. And so a big part of that is educating like, this is what protein does to your body. And this is what fat does your body and so carbohydrate, just your body. And this is why we want to eat this much of it, not much of it and all that kind of stuff so that even if it's not 100% Perfect, you have an idea of what you're doing. And you can manage that on your own

JP Gaston:

that awareness. I'm not in your program, but I started making myself more aware of my portion sizes and what I was actually putting in my body. And that awareness like even in my worst times, has stuck with like when I'm eating chips. I am now fully aware of what I am putting in my body and it makes me think twice about it. Like it's a really good trigger for that. Totally.

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah. 100% and, you know, a big one that we talk about a lot is alcohol And people just don't understand the impacts of alcohol. Now, I know all the impacts, I'm still going to have some drinks, because I enjoy having drinks with friends and with my wife and that kind of stuff. But I know exactly what's happening. So when I feel like crap the next day, I know exactly what. And there's no ambiguity about that. There's no ignorance, you know what I mean? I know exactly what I'm doing. And I can make that choice. But when you don't know, and you can never fix it, you can never make the choice because you don't have the knowledge to do it.

JP Gaston:

There was a point when I was doing my workouts and just trying to work on my nutrition where I was, every time I ate something, I was like, well, here's a kilometer of running, or Well, here's 15 minutes. And then every time I finished, like, wow, that's like 57 minutes worth of workout. Now I got to do to compensate if I want to actually lose weight.

Pat Woodcock:

And that's, I mean, certainly the, there's people that follow that. And, but that's, that's not a, it's not a good mindset to be in because it makes nothing enjoyable, right? It makes the exercise not enjoyable, but it makes the food not enjoyable. It's just about finding the right balance of the two so that you can enjoy your exercise and just do it for exercise, and your workouts, and then you can also enjoy your food.

JP Gaston:

The only time it works for me, were the handful of times where I was working out and near the end of it, I thought, well, I did a little extra push today, I can have some pizza later. Like I get an extra push to get the extra push, it was just making something horrible. You mentioned there, though, you kind of mentioned like a almost like a finite time together, like you know that your time with individuals is going to end. And a little bit earlier, you had also mentioned people trying new things and trying to keep it fresh. So is there something that you do to try and try and keep it fresh and hold on to clients? Or do you kind of have the mindset that, hey, we're gonna be together for a finite amount of time, so that I can give you the tools to do what you need? After you leave?

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, so that it's very individual. So, you know, depending on how sort of the first block of training goes and the initial program, then, you know, we have a discussion in terms of okay, so how do you feel and what would you like to do next, and those kind of things. So, it goes one of two ways, there's a lot of guys who just needed a little, a little push a little tweak a little bit of that to kind of get things back on track, and they feel good about moving forward on their own. And then, you know, ideally, you know, they've learned a little bit about training and nutrition, and they're good to go. And there's other guys who really enjoy the type of programming that I do really enjoy not having to think when they go to the gym, they just show up and do the program. And they really enjoy the ongoing support and having fresh workouts and just kind of the whole thing of, you know, kind of having, I guess the fitness side of things taken care of for them, they don't have to mentally put any energy into that. So they can keep their energy for family and business and those kind of things. And like I've had clients for that continue for three years, four years, five years, some just online, some in person, but it's it's very individual. And it sort of depends on how busy people are. And that kind of stuff, the busier you are, the more you'll want stuff to be taken care of. And you don't have to think about it right. So, but I do I do keep it fresh. And you know, I change the workouts up and change the style of workouts and go from full body to upper body, lower body and mixing some different types of conditioning and all those kind of things to keep it interesting, because I mean, I've been training since I was 18 years old, right? So I cannot do the same thing over and over and over again, because it drives me crazy. So you know, I move around myself, so I know exactly how it feels to want something fresh. But without being gimmicky about it, like I still want you to get results. So we're gonna keep doing some basics, but we're gonna change it up the way it looks and the way it feels and keep things fresh and interesting for you. So that your habit going right, I don't want you to get bored and step away.

JP Gaston:

And just not just another day of leg presses. Like let's do something a little different.

Pat Woodcock:

Let's do something else.

Seth Anderson:

We've, we've talked, we've sort of skirted around mindset a little bit, what kind of common mindsets Do you see show up looking for your program? Like? Are they people who are lost? Are they people who are just looking to find that next edge? Or do you kind of get people from all walks of life showing up at your door?

Pat Woodcock:

At this point, I think I'm getting a lot of big variety with very different mindsets. But I would say the two overarching are kind of at the two ends of the spectrum. So there's like you said, there's the guys that are lost, who have never really been in shape, don't know how to exercise, don't go to the gym. But they've achieved business success, they have family, and now they're in their 40s. And they're like, I'm not healthy, I'm not going to be able to live long enough to enjoy this and be here for my kids, I need to fix it. Please help. And then the other end of the spectrum is guys who maybe have been in shape before and are used to being in shape, but have gotten off track and you're busy with business and family and stuff and really want to be back at the a level fitness where they expect to be where they want their fitness to kind of match their business success and their family's success and like have everything kind of be on the same level instead of districts falling behind. So those are kind of the two, the two most prevalent types of members that I have. And so very different, right? In terms of dealing with one side and dealing with the other side. It's part of what makes keeps making To be a better coaches, you know, we're dealing with the very, very broad spectrum of, of mindsets and experiences and what people are capable of, and all those kinds of things. That's, that's what keeps it fun and interesting. I feel that not working with the same guy every time,

JP Gaston:

I was very much in shape and, you know, have just kind of fallen off the track for the last 30 years. 10 years, like top

Pat Woodcock:

abs of steel at 10. Yep. And then and yeah, like, that's like, that's the situation that I was in when I got started, right, I'd always kind of been in shape. And then well, I want to get back in shape. So I'll go back and do the same thing that I've always done. Well, it doesn't work anymore.

Seth Anderson:

Is there a couple of key things you can sort of crystallize that you've learned about yourself as a coach during this sort of venture?

Pat Woodcock:

I would say one of the biggest ones actually, is, it's kind of something that you alluded to earlier in that, like, I'm not, I'm not the hardest military coach. And coming from a football background, a lot of people expect that or from, you know, an athlete training performance coach that I was before. A lot of people expect that the screaming and the yelling, and do you suck, like you didn't do it. Like, that's, that's not my style of coaching at all. It never really was. And it certainly doesn't apply to clients now. Because it's, it's much more about understanding where you're at, and fitness and health and that kind of stuff should be making your life better, and fitting into your life to improve it, not overtaking it and becoming the sole focus and that kind of stuff. So, for me being a screamer yeller hard ask kind of like that was, that's just not mean, it doesn't fit the type of coaching that my clients need. So that's been that's been kind of interesting, like I said, coming from a football background, and kind of having coaches that did that a lot, too, when I stepped back and kind of see the way I interact with, with my clients and the way I coach people, it's, it's very conversational, like this, right? It's much more instructive and just conversational. And it's not. There's not a lot of screaming yelling motivation stuff. Because if you need me to do that, then we're not doing the right stuff anyway.

Seth Anderson:

In that vein, is there a we kind of talked about coaches in your life? Is there a football coach that really kind of helped you in your career? And sort of creating this style that you have? Now?

Pat Woodcock:

That's an interesting question. You know, there's obviously, there's certainly coaches that that helped, I think, for me, what I've always tried to do is kind of pick the best elements from coaches that and kind of use those things. And also, to see what I really didn't like, in certain coaches and make sure that I didn't bring that to the table. I definitely had coaches who, you know, your best friend, when you're productive, and you're playing well, and all that kind of stuff, and you get into a slump, and they don't talk to you and like, I want nothing to do with that kind of stuff. And like, that's just not how you deal with people. And then, you know, I think, I think being able to, the biggest thing is honestly being able to coach everybody a little bit different. And that's, you know, I've had a couple of different coaches who who were really good at that who everybody says, you know, everybody's the same. Everybody gets coached saying, Well, no BS, everybody's like, everybody's the same. But you can't coach everybody

Seth Anderson:

treated equitably, like everybody gets treated fairly. But that doesn't mean the same. It fairly is not

Pat Woodcock:

the same. Yes, exactly. So yeah, there's, there's some people that that need a little more hand holding, and pushing and prodding and support and that kind of stuff. And there's some people who, like you say, go in there, they're good to go. And you might not hear from them for two months. And then they come back and say, Yeah, I'm killing it. I'll feel great. And everything's amazing. It's just a matter of trying to figure out the right style for each individual.

Seth Anderson:

Are you? Are you getting into coaching your kids sports, or I'm trying

Pat Woodcock:

to avoid that, take as much as I can. I kind of don't want to be that that I think coming from sport, that'll be hard for me. Yeah, that'll be hard for me, because, like, I'll expect a lot and I don't want to do that. I will train them probably like, I'll take them to the gym, and I'll do that kind of stuff. But I don't, I don't want to get involved with actually coaching their sport. I don't want that. I don't want that to come home. You know what I mean? I don't want like crappy game. And so they're mad at me. I'm mad at them because of the election. I just want to I want to support them. Whether it's a good game or a bad game. I just want to you know what I mean? I want to be I want to be dad, and I want to be coached.

JP Gaston:

It's funny you mentioned the styles of coaches that you've been through because we had last season we had Mike Moriarty on and he okay, I wouldn't say he gave like it was exactly the same answer was that he kind of picked and chosen these different elements from different coaches because there there were certainly a handful that had the the breadth of skill and were able to kind of dabble in each spot equally. But for the most part that you either had a hard ass coach who was too hard or you had a too soft coach.

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, for sure. I mean, I think it's just like any other industry there's there's a lot of guys who, who become coaches and even have success almost in spite of the way they coach, you know what I mean? Or, or what works really well for one team, they think that's the way to do it for every team. And it's that's just not reality. Perfect example is guys who are hard asses in college and then become pro coaches and try to do that with pro athletes. That doesn't work. You can't talk to a grown man making money, though you talk to an 18 year old kid who's scared of you, right? Like it just it just doesn't work that way. So the guys who are adaptable, like they tend to have success, right? And the guys who can, it's just like any other business, right? When you can adapt and find the path that works best. Like, that's what's going to work. But if you try to do it the same way over and over and over again, regarding a situation like that, that's just going to have very limited success anyways, so it doesn't surprise me at all that Mike would would have kind of the same answer. It's, that's the nature of coaching. I think that's the nature of sports is you're going to have guys who, who are the screamers and yellers. And somewhere along the line, they had success. And so they decided that's the way to do it. And the opposite to I did, I did have, you know, at least one coach who was too nice and too loyal and too like to a fault. And you can't win that way. Either. There has to be some accountability. And you know, you're in a performance based business, you can be loyal, and you can be friends and all that kind of stuff. But you still got to produce it.

JP Gaston:

And I think it's weaning off over time, right? Like, the hardest coach was the big thing, let's say 50 years ago, and they realized, Hey, we got to do things differently. And over the last 50 years we've progressed to here. It does kind of make me wonder, you know, 50 years from now, are people going to be looking at what we're doing and thinking, wow, those guys were jerks. Like we're

Seth Anderson:

not even 50 years ago, like I think I'm Mike Keenan. Like he was still employed. Yeah, not that long ago, he might still be employed in Russia.

JP Gaston:

Still a lot who are in but I just mean the majority, right? Like we're, we're we're definitely having a shift from where we were in the 50s 60s 70s. Which sounds like a long time ago to us. But you know, in the grand scheme of leadership and coaching, it's not that long ago. So pretty quickly. Yeah. So like 50 years from now, even 20 years from now, how are people going to reflect on the way that we're coaching? Because we think it's great, and like, personally, it feels good. The way that yeah, we're coaching but I wonder what advancements will be made?

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, it's it's interesting, right? I mean, it's, you know, there's, there's always evolving, and there's always new techniques, I guess. But when you're in the moment, right, like, right now you're like, Well, what else could we possibly be doing? Like, what else? Somewhere along the line? Yeah, we're here. That's it, we got it. We are now on the shoulders of the giants we're tackling. Yeah, in a few years, somebody will be doing the same thing. We

JP Gaston:

are holding up the Grey Cup of coaching.

Seth Anderson:

So Pat, what? What are you working on personal development wise? And how are you? How are you feeding your mind these days.

Pat Woodcock:

So a few different things. From like, for me, I think I'm always trying to evolve in, in all aspects of what I'm doing. So for me, the biggest thing right now is trying to balance growing business in New new type of business, as well as be present at home and be not thinking business when I'm supposed to be dad and supposed to be family time. So that's, that's the biggest one for me right now in terms of trying to manage my schedule, manage my mindset, just figure out the best way to to do both of those things as well as I can. Not always easy, especially with with young kids in the schedule can be unpredictable. And now this is my scheduled work time I got to work now. And you know, that just throws the whole day off when you can't do that. So it's, it's, it's always a challenge. And it's, it's challenging for me because like I said earlier, I'm a bit of a creature of habit, when I get out of routine throws me all at a routine throws throws everything kind of out of whack a little bit. And so that's something I'm always trying to get better at and putting a kind of a bigger focus on it right now, just because, you know, my kids are getting older. And thankfully, as we're coming out of stuff, we're getting back into our activities, and everybody's got sports and practice and all those kinds of things. And I want to be available for those things and all that kind of stuff. And at the same time, you know, like I said, pushing online is a relatively new business, you know, for me in the last couple years, at least in terms of the level, I'm doing it now. So there's lots of moving parts there and trying to get the systems right and make sure I'm providing the best service that I can. So trying to balance those two things at the same time is is always an interesting game.

Seth Anderson:

Any. I can't believe it. We're already knocking on 2022 Feels like I've still somewhere in 2019 Any any big goals for the upcoming year?

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, there's there's a few. I mean, I'll be 45 in April. So I kind of have it in my head that I want to get in the best shape I've ever been in in my life by then. Just another thing to add into the balancing act. So I mean, obviously different kinds of shapes. So you know, I'm just fizzy cape and looking shape and that kind of stuff. I'll never be able to run like I did when I was 25. But, but I'd like to do that by My birthday. And then I was actually thinking I would like to potentially run track in the summer, which I haven't done in years. So that would be a whole new type of training again, back to back to some of the stuff I did when I was younger. So from a physical side of things, and a personal side of things, those things, and then yeah, business wise, you know, got a few numbers I'd like to hit next year, in terms of another flick kind of moving into the second full calendar year of being online and, and running this program. So making some making some good moves here at the end of the year to kind of set up for those things and, you know, have the systems in place to be able to get all that done in 2022, as well.

Seth Anderson:

That's exciting. I thought when you said get in the best shape, maybe ranglin at a CFL, come back there but

Pat Woodcock:

no chance, no chance. It's funny, like the odd time all you know, I'll post a workout video or something and say, Oh, he looked like he could still play his suits, all mirrors and smoking. You know, I could probably give you like one series before my hamstring started popping out of the side of my legs and that kind of stuff. Yeah, it's, it's a different deal, man. It's a different deal. And, you know, you look back on some of the things that that I did at that time. And we used to joke about it a lot, actually, the teammates, my teammates, and I, that people just don't realize what it feels like and what it takes to play at that level. And, you know, everybody comes to the game on Sunday and watches us run around and all that kind of stuff. But if they saw us get out of bed Monday morning, they wouldn't believe what we looked like and you know, 80 year old men, you know, crawling into the field for practice the next day and that kind of stuff. So yeah, my body just couldn't never recover from anything like that right

JP Gaston:

now. It's, it's like the joke that they have about the Olympics. There should always be one regular guy there as a frame of reference, because all you're seeing is a totally high athletes compete against other super high performance, I believe so it looks like it looks like nothing. Like when I yeah, I play hockey quite often at winsport. And they have the big the big ice, which is like the Olympic Yes. But anyways, it's huge in comparison to the regular rinks. And you think I see people skate on all the time, no big deal. And then you actually watch people skate on you're like, wow, you're slow, like you are so tiny. You're not taking up any of the ice.

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah. It's different man. It's different. And even just, you know, taking my kids, obviously to watch some CFL games and that kind of stuff. And even sitting in the stands like, it's not the same when you get on the field level. And you see those guys moving around and hear the collisions

Seth Anderson:

up close, man, I played one year of high school football in grade 12. And I can still remember being out there. During a punt or during kickoff and just how fast everybody was moving. It was like the first time I'd ever played. I'm like, I don't know if this is for me.

Pat Woodcock:

Yeah, it's it's crazy, man. And yeah, I mean, just every level, it just magnifies the speed and the size and it's a lattice collision I ever heard on a football field was on a kickoff. Give you the story real quick. So I was returning the kick. So there was two of us back So myself and Tony Tompkins was the returner. He's about the same size as me. So both small guys. And this was when Ricky Williams was playing for the Argos. So the write about he was so he was covering the kickoff, you can believe that. So the ball came to me. So I started kind of coming up the middle and kind of cut this way. Tony was over here. He came across to kind of block for me as I was coming off his butt. And so Ricky was coming down. And so Tony cut across, I kind of went and I just heard this explosion. And then you know, I ran about another 10 or 15 year olds got tackled I turn around and Tony's just dead on the field guides everywhere all over the place. And you watched it like Tony saved my life you watch the replay and he just took one for the team threw himself in front of the torpedo. But blew him up. Yeah, it just absolutely crushed him he was probably a difference of at least 50 pounds and they were probably the same speed. Ricky of course had like a 50 yard head start coming down covering kicks. So as the as the only time I remember like running with the ball and hearing a collision going, what the hell was that in the middle of a play? And to turn around and find out what

JP Gaston:

it was he turned around and there's like a equipment yard sale going on 10 yards definitely

Pat Woodcock:

in a dead body in the middle of

Seth Anderson:

I think that's perfect start in this odd Thank you. Thank you so much for making the time Pat. We really appreciate it. Yeah, man,

Pat Woodcock:

I enjoyed the conversation. I appreciate you having me

JP Gaston:

on. And if people are looking to get in touch with you want to talk fitness or nutrition or anything, how can they how can they reach

Pat Woodcock:

out? Yeah, the easiest place to find me is on social media. So on Instagram, I'm at elite coach, all one word and then just my name app Woodcock on Facebook, or LinkedIn.

JP Gaston:

Awesome. Thanks so much for joining us, Pat. Thanks, boys. Awesome. You got it. Cheers. Thanks for listening to today's episode. Don't forget to hit subscribe and leave a review. Of course if you're interested in coaching, send us an email to coaching at the biz dojo.com