The Biz Dojo

S3E21 - From Empathy to Action: Roles of a Leader w/Tariq Sbiet

December 21, 2021 Tariq Sbiet Season 3 Episode 21
The Biz Dojo
S3E21 - From Empathy to Action: Roles of a Leader w/Tariq Sbiet
Show Notes Transcript

This week in The Biz Dojo, we are joined by, CEO and Co-founder of North Pole Hoops, a Canadian basketball media and recruitment organization based in Toronto.

Tariq shares the evolution of his perception of his role within the organization and acceptance of the changing dynamic into a more strategic position as CEO. We talk a little basketball, but also get into the business of basketball, sponsorships, and what it means to form a community.

We also take some time to talk about leadership, a key skill not only as CEO, but also for the coaches, trainers and even players within the organization. Empathy and action go hand-in-hand as we walk through what it's like to be a leader in challenging times.

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JP Gaston:

Hey, you should be listening to us on the news li app. Just visit newsleave.me to download today and listen to the entire internet, including podcasts like this one. You can also check out our conversation with founder Jani season three episode eight.

Voiceover:

This episode is powered by airdry DQ grill and chill owned and operated by local entrepreneurs. Check out one of their three airdry locations today and pick up a blizzard ice cream cake for Dilly bar.

Seth Anderson:

The Biz Dojo is also brought to you by beyond a beaten path. If you're on the lookout for a personalized gift had to be on the beaten path.ca and get started on your custom creation beyond the beaten path, personalize it, because everything else is boring. So it occurred to me on the weekend JP that it was this still this calendar year when we did those first episodes with Bill and Mike and Nicole. My goodness, that feels like two years ago, honestly,

JP Gaston:

it absolutely does. I can't it hasn't even been a full calendar. Like it's been

Seth Anderson:

no, we started January 20. It was crazy. It is crazy. How many people we've had the privilege of connecting with over these last, you know, call it 15 months, but even just in this calendar year?

JP Gaston:

Well, there's the show, there's chopping it up. There's all the connections we made outside of the show that people might not be aware of at all, in relation to the show. And then now we've kind of transitioned into this coaching and consulting firm, firm, firm. That sounds good. And we've made so many connections there too.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, and it's like one thing feeds another. And, you know, I've learned so much about leadership, life networking, just like I don't know, man, like the one thing on my list of 21 things that I wanted to sort of focus on and 2021 that I did not get to, I still got, what do I got 11 days. Go go go go was to write a book. But honestly, I feel like I could write a book on what we've experienced this year.

JP Gaston:

The fact that you are going to write a book in a year, I'm

Seth Anderson:

going to write one in 11 days. I'm gonna do the old Mark Cuban where I just take all my blogs and put them in a book and call it a book,

JP Gaston:

chapter one, November 18 Chapter Two, November 9.

Seth Anderson:

Reason that you've put on your Star Trek voice for that Captain's log,

JP Gaston:

Captain's log, started six, seven 5.2. Now, you know the other thing that I find interesting about our seasons, over the course of this year is how some of the relationships especially from our earliest conversations have changed. Started out as kind of this, we're hoping that you are a guest on the show slowly turned into Hey, you were a past guest on the show. Now we're connected on this level turned into like almost a friendship turned into business partners turned into like it's crazy. The evolution of those relationships as the show has grown

Seth Anderson:

infinite possibilities, once you open the door to anything, and I think that's that's what you're getting out there. Like you don't really know until you know, some of these some of the these shows are these episodes start with shooting a shot. And it's just led to all kinds of cool places. And I think this is another one of those. So we had Tarik spate. So he's a CEO of North Pole hoops. Really cool guy, again, that I just sort of happened upon on LinkedIn, we had some common connections, he was in the basketball industry. I just kind of started out by wanting to pick his brain a little bit and understand sort of what this whole North Pole hoops thing was, and they're up to some cool stuff. I would say

JP Gaston:

those connections to our earlier episodes, we've we've talked to a fair number of basketball folks between Oh, do you remember doing sports journeys? Sports, that was a thing for a while? Do

Seth Anderson:

I was the thing I think we need to get back to that thing at some point. But I think and someone asked me the other day, like, are you guys just kind of like a sports podcast now? And I was like, No, not really. Like we've, we've got, you know, I think a breadth of people that have come on the show. And everybody that has come on from the sports world, for the most part, also has that business executive or leadership experience that we talk about. And, you know, to me that's like, like sports is like a microcosm of life. Like it's just, it's all the same stuff is just like really like jam packed and condensed and lots of pressure. But like, all those attributes are there

JP Gaston:

when we talk about our model for our business, right? Really being centered on sort of that stuff. awareness. And I think all of the sports people we've had on have had different perspectives, there's been the community perspective, which is one of our pillars, there's been the mentor guy. Yeah, there's the the mental wellness and the physical wellness, there's building the community, they've

Seth Anderson:

had it all, all those, all those elements that, you know, we value and we think are important to not only living a good life, but you know, being fulfilled and productive and happy, whatever you want to call it. You know, the athletes and the people in the sports industry we've had on have really showcased you need all those dimensions to be successful.

JP Gaston:

Yeah. And to your point, it's like a little microcosm of the society, yeah, surely coming together. And you think about the mental wellness space, they have to make quick decisions, whether it's in the sport or surrounding the sport to prepare for it, like they're making very quick decisions, whereas for a lot of folks, they have a little bit of a longer span, to work in. But for folks in the sporting world, it's just so rapid that they have a ton of experience.

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, and I think one of the things from this episode that I really took away, was around, you know, sort of this evolution Park was talking about going from sort of being in the operations of basketball, the player development side, and then over the last 10 years, moving into the executive and the business side, and even though you're still talking to a lot of the same people, you know, the the role of responsibility, the outcomes, that you're responsible for change, and therefore, your mindset, the conversation, like, all that stuff starts to evolve. And I don't know, that resonates for me, when I think of my corporate journey, you know, I'm still in the same business, you know, area still surrounded by a lot of the same people. But I'm on like, my fourth different career. And it's every time it kind of requires a different mindset, a different approach different conversations, I don't know about you, but that that's something that I've been thinking about a lot since we since we chatted with him,

JP Gaston:

Oh, for sure that like the corporate environment that we've both been in like that. It's very much like that. And I'm thinking even about the show, right? Like our our show, the evolution of our show has been such that we've had to go from trying to think of a few friends and family who might be good on the show to now we're actually getting requests from people who would like to be on the show, who have an interesting story we have kind of the CEO role, as you said, is been thrust upon us over the last few months. And now, you know, we're doing business to business conversations. We're doing like all sorts of stuff outside of, I think back to our very first episode with very like, that was a very different conversation than the conversations we're having today with some of the people and businesses we deal with.

Seth Anderson:

Well, it's interesting, because like, it is like a lot has evolved and changed and grown. But it's funny, I was talking to Lauren the other day, she was episode two. And I asked and she lives so she listened to the episode we just did with with Andrew and her episode, and I was like, is it like, night and day, like totally different? Cuz I'm too afraid to go back. And she was like, actually, no, like, they were both, like, just very conversational and like, you know, very homey, and like, just they had like a good vibe to them. And I'm like, Cool. So like, as much as we've grown and evolved, I think we've stayed grounded and rooted in like what this is, which is, you know, having genuine conversations with people to help inspire others. So I thought that was a cool perspective.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, well, I'm we're coming up on the close like this is, this is the final episode, single tier, single for this for this season. And we don't know what season four is exactly going to look like yet. But Season Four coming at you soon.

Seth Anderson:

Sometime. We got we got projects, we got things that we want to work on with some really cool people. So we're not going to put any pressure on ourselves just yet in terms of when season four is going to come out. But

JP Gaston:

we know what's happening. We just yeah, we're not going to give you a date right now

Seth Anderson:

sometime in the new year. You will you will hear from us. And I mean, we'll keep our socials active and all that kind of stuff. But you know, we've got some pretty exciting projects in the hopper that

JP Gaston:

very exciting. I am very i There is even a few that came up recently that in

Seth Anderson:

the last couple days, and like who knows what door we're going to open next. So looking forward to it. In the meantime, you've got our whole catalogue 50 Plus episodes now, including this one. So let's jump into it with Tarik from North Pole hoops. This week in the dojo we're joined by Tarik spate. Mark is the CEO and co founder of North Pole hoops based out in Toronto, welcome to the dojo TARC thanks for having me, guys. Yeah, absolute pleasure. So you and I ended up getting hooked up on LinkedIn. And it's been a pleasure getting to know you these last few weeks but you know, for the folks listening in maybe the first time they've heard of you or you know, part of your network. Why don't just Take a minute and introduce yourself what? What are you up to? And what are you all about?

Tariq Sbiet:

Sure. So for North Pole hoops, started that about 11 years ago go into your 12th. And that it's changed. But I'm doing I've been doing has been changing kind of year to year. Over the last couple months, I've really been focusing on sponsorship partnership in the basketball world. And that's been that's been really fun, because it's really connecting my two passions, which is business, and basketball and ultimately sharing with corporate Canada and into the business community at large the opportunity that they have to grow with basketball and utilize basketball as a vehicle. That's been the message and the people I've been talking to the companies I've been talking to been pretty excited about it. They've always wanted to get in basketball, the feedback I get they just looking for the avenues to do that. So, you know, I've been helping them communicate that. And it's literally been exposed over 100 companies in the last two months from the startup companies, I'm always going to support startups as a as an entrepreneur myself, to you know, corporate Canada, big brands, so excited about it. Also on the player endorsement side, is a great opportunity there to work with different NBA players from Canada, that I've known for 10 years know them in their families. I'm also reintroducing myself to them kind of went from Tarik as the kind of connector when it came to the student athlete and the college program, connecting those dots. And now it's like, you know, NBA player, or even college player now and i els connecting them to a lot of different people. And it's kind of the next step in my career as well.

JP Gaston:

Basketball as a vehicle. I like that line. What, what does that mean for you? What's the what's the connection there?

Tariq Sbiet:

It makes sense, when you think about what basketball does. And for right now, when I use that word, and the role that I'm in, it's used as a vehicle to connect people connect communities, when it comes to sponsorship, for example, for people that don't understand how sponsorship works, it's you know, companies that are trying to reach the communities across the country, across the province, across the continent, you know, so from a from a kind of sponsorship standpoint, it's a vehicle to connect communities, and then it's a vehicle to, for players to change their lives, literally, you know, kids that come from low income situation, tough times, they get the scholarship that's worth over $100,000 USD, they're able to, you know, use it to get their education. And then on a, maybe a more macro level, I think it's a vehicle for positive global impact, which is, what our mission is about, and what we're doing, we've been doing it in Canada, you know, it's really starting to have a global feel to it progressively. And just so happens that the CBl bcls kickoff today, they're kind of on that same wavelength as well, where they're bringing candidates to the world now, through basketball, and that's exactly what we're doing as well. So it's a powerful vehicle. You know, some people might look at it as a sport, but it's something that connects people, regardless of race, regardless of religion, regardless of gender now just connects people to passion and love, like loving the game, if you're not even asked right now brings us together, you know,

Seth Anderson:

for sure, for sure. I love that. I tend to think that just sport in general is such a unifying. You know, when we live in such a, I guess a world that's become so divisive and there's so much you know, negativity always swirling around, I find sport is one of those things that that can really bring people together in a special way that not a lot of other things can. I'm curious, just when you're talking about sort of your evolution from being something of a connector, sort of, in the, I'll say like operational side of basketball, helping players get opportunities, mentorship, that kind of thing, moving into like a CEO role, where now you're running the business. What was that evolution, like for you from like a mindset stem be like, interacting with maybe the same people, but having a different outcome that you're trying to get to? And what's that? What's that journey been like for you?

Tariq Sbiet:

That's a good question. Um, you know, the early in the early days, like the title hasn't changed because I'm the founder of the company. So the role has changed, you know, and but for me, the word the word or the title, CEO, Chief Executive Officer, that's it comes with a lot of responsibility. And I never called myself that early in the early days, like, even on my business card, it said National Scout before, because that's what I was doing. I was I was scouting, you know, and I didn't have, you know, a big team that I was leading. You know, I think that's where the responsibility comes. Its leadership, right. And it's about Empower, empowering others. And that's the right thing. My role has constantly been growing and changing is in the leadership side. But in the early days, it was me traveling across the country, looking for the best players in the country. In New York guys, case, a here Gu gwoc was a player that came through our showcases MVP, we help connect them to the University of New Mexico is now at a university Loyola, they've been a tournament team. So he was in an Edmonton kid, that that was my job. That was it was my job was traveling around, and now we have some of our younger guys coming up that have stepped up in that scouting role that kind of fits one of our departments. And now it's about again, it's about Empower, empowering people, it's about having a plan, helping provide structure for people in their lives, you know, because they, in this case, love basketball. They understand the sport is growing, but they don't understand how do I bring my passion and my skills, my interest? And make a career out? You know, or how do I? How do I, you know, elevate from where I currently am to that next level. And when I tell, you know, staff that I might be speaking to, and they tell me they want to do this, I never tell them no, I tell them how, like, this is how we can do it. This is how we can create the plan, or how we can execute. Some people don't want to hear it. You know, some people don't want to, especially younger people, they don't understand that, you know, when you come through our doors, you're coming to live your dream, you're coming to create a dream job. And you're coming to create it, right. And we our philosophy of our company is you get what you put in, oftentimes, particularly younger people, because it comes with maturity, they may think that it's like any other job, like you know, you know, a nine to five job that anybody can get as a 18 or 21 year old or 22 year old at a grocery store, and you get paid X amount. And you know, that's what it is like, this is a little bit different. There's just like with anything that's special, or people want or is competitive, like it takes sacrifice, it takes extra sacrifice to like live your dream. So that's kind of the culture that we're trying to build is we start we all started in the garage, my brother and I, when we found this company, we literally started in the garage. And then we moved up to our parents living room. And then we moved up to our, to our room, we made one of the rooms the office, the other we were in, like what 27 year old, he was 29 at the time was not long ago, you know, we were in this sleeping in the same room, but like that's the sacrifice that it takes, you know, and then so now, anybody that's working with us, they understand that mindset of or they if they don't understand they stand out right away. Because that's our culture, everyone understands that, hey, get what you put in, started the garage, but there's room for growth, there's lots of room for growth, and opportunity. So, you know, I think that's been a to kind of go back to your original question of like, how has the role changed? Like, it's a lot more leadership, because I have more people, you know, they're following. And also the circles my circles have changed in terms of the day to day conversations that I'm having with they're not really basketball people anymore as much. You know, like, by even by me by that is like basketball industry people. They might be, you know, a business owner or brand director that loves ball, or some that don't so maybe even hockey people. But it's it's a different group, which is good because that's what we needed to get to the next level. We've already spoken to all the basketball team, I've traveled across the country for 10 plus years and sat in the living rooms of basketball people across the country. So we know all the basketball people that we need to now we need to learn the market. Now we need to learn we need to get to another market and then bring that market to like have them collide with each other through basketball through the vehicle. As we said earlier,

JP Gaston:

it did torque the national scope. Think about Tarik the CEO but it was that always the the idea was to get towards the business. Senator where you just, this is what I want to do. And then it came about as this leadership role unexpectedly.

Tariq Sbiet:

No, I always knew that was coming. I knew that I wasn't ready for for it yet. Because my thing was I needed to get it, I need to have the team. And I had to get the right team in place, we've went through some turnover in the past, you don't have to have the right pieces. And organization is only as good as its people. I don't care what industry you're in. And, you know, so we had to get like minded individuals that I knew it was, it was only up until that point, that and then you get to people, you have to have infrastructure, you have to have processes, you know, those things are crucial. And I definitely did not do that on my own. We developed our leadership team, which helped take it to another level from Tarik, you know, a young entrepreneur, young entrepreneur that felt like he had to take everything on his shoulders alone, to you know, leaning on my teammates leading on my my lead, creating a leadership team. So that now when it comes to major decisions, it's a collective decision, I stopped, kind of make the final call on it. But you know, it's gaining perspective versus just it being a Tarik decision. It's, it's surveying the room, collecting the information, and then making the right decision based on our personnel and where we're at. And then, ultimately, the one thing that I've always said, I learned this about myself as time progressed, that I'm a visionary. I didn't know that like until people started saying that, because I just, I'm just me, I just think how I think, you know, but it wasn't up until, like, you know, certain things happened, where whether people would say, or I'll be like, wait a minute, I'm saying what's about to happen in six to 12 months or two years, in this space, because it's like, looked at basketball. and Canadian basketball is like a flat piece of clay. That could be molded however, it's molded, because I come from, you know, some roots, family roots, like land in Lansing, Michigan, East Lansing, that's where, you know, Michigan State University Spartans are, and I got a chance to kind of absorb some of that culture. And I always, I always thought man, like, I wish we could, in Canada have like Canadian universities, like packed house and culture and generations of people coming together. And my whole thought process was, let's build it, let's make it happen. Let's get the energy, that's still the excitement. And also as as progress, figured out that I'm a marketer by heart. And that was, that was a joke, like, I get it from my mom, she's like, a social butterfly, as I was talking to everybody, and I'm the same way. So yeah, it's a, it's taken time to kind of get to, as to make, to have the rules kind of evolved. But I knew that the end game was, I love basketball, or as well, but I actually like business just as much, if not even more now. Or maybe it's or maybe it's growth, like the idea of growth, and like taking it to another level, whatever that may be. But definitely love, like, creating solutions, you know, and having to do like talking to Company A or executive ABC, all three have different goals. But I want to know, like, what is your goal, and I know, I can bring value to the table, because I can help complement that goal or help reach that goal. Or even in some cases, for younger companies set the goal because young entrepreneurs do not they're kind of stuck in the mud, and they don't even have the goal in front of them. I find a lot of times so you know, and through COVID When it first kicked off, I jumped I jumped outside of basketball, I started offering consultation. And so a lot has kind of happened there. Whereas like led me into which led me into what I'm doing now, in terms of, you know, sponsorship in terms of marketing deals, and it's like, it's all about the solutions at the end of the day. But you can, if you can do outs in basketball outside of basketball, you can do anywhere, because the skills are like transferable. I find

Seth Anderson:

that makes a lot of sense. I mean, at the end of the day business is business and I think you've got a really cool opportunity where you get to work on business and leadership and things you're passionate about and an industry that is, you know, I think on the precipice of exploding in Canada and II think about it like I'm only 35 And when I was going to like Elementary in high school, I think I was 10 or 11 when the raptors and grizzlies came out and like there was no Canadian basketball presence really like you played in high school or middle school. And that was kind of it like they were Steve Nash and Todd makalah and like a couple of guys, but like Canada basketball just wasn't like it was sort of a blank slate and even up until the last few years like the growth I would say at the grassroots level is just kind of starting to scratch the surface of what I think the potential is. And so I guess for you, as you're meeting with business A, B, and C, I'm curious, like, what? Or maybe maybe one question would be like, what are some of the things you hear that people don't know about the industry? Or they're unsure of in terms of making an investment or a sponsorship? And then, you know, how are you helping connect the dots and get them excited about the industry? And like, what's that look like in a day of tax life?

Tariq Sbiet:

I love these questions because I don't get off the time thought of the business side of it. It's easy the basketball, so it's good. A lot of companies don't even know what our ecosystem looks like. Like they don't even know that there's basketball being played every weekend in a league format. You know, so there's a way to not only connect, but continue to evolve week to week improve the activation week to week. I also think there's just like some people that aren't like they like the raptors, they like basketball through the rafters, but they don't understand the space, like the whole ecosystem. So I'm talking like, the height starting at the high school or middle school level, amateur level, you know, to college level, and what's coming next. Like we have 26 Canadians in the NBA right now between bowl contracts, the two ways to do it. And that number is expected to double three to five years from now, I can say that, because we know who the guys that are coming up through the pipeline are like that's a crazy statement, right? Like, I'm saying, essentially in three to five years, we'll have 50 Canadians in the NBA ish around that number, or maybe more. Right. And you see at the college level, the Benedict Metro rams at Arizona, who's from Quebec, you see the Andrew nem hearts. You see the Zack EDIS at Purdue, like, we're talking about guys that are like, they're at the top of the top of college basketball number 12345, top 10 ranked teams, and they're playing their starters, in some cases, the stars of the team. So I think a lot of times, people don't like to get especially the people that aren't basketball people. They don't have that context, like the actual talent of I can't do what I do, and play the role that I play if the talent isn't there. And it's the excitement isn't there that these kids are like, you know, the lateral band is playing for the Raptors. You know, Chris Boucher. Can birch got three Canadians? You know, for the Raptors. I was at the game the other day with when OKC was in town, you know, shake gills? Yes, he's a franchise player. You have, you know, Lou d'or you had five Canadians in that game, just that one game?

Seth Anderson:

Well, I think the good context to around like the volume like 50 Canadians may not sound like a lot, especially if you're used to like hockey as your like frame of reference. But there's only 15 players on a basketball team and really, you know, 10 to 12 the play meaningful minutes if you have 50 players in the NBA, that's, you know, the better part of 10 to 12% of the league being Canadian, that's wild, which is crazy, because like 15 years ago, there was like two three guys. Absolutely. You know, the other thing I think of two that you mentioned there like people like the raptors, but I don't know if people fully appreciate the impact of the raptors, you know, and I think we talked about this in one of the first times we met, I can't remember the exact number but I believe in Calgary, JP youth basketball registration, like tripled or quadrupled in 2019 when the Raptors won the championship. Now imagine you know, the Raptors you, they're going to go on around here with Scotty barns and Lando band and in some of these, you know, young guys that are coming up that are relatable like a band and a Canadian blue Shea, etc. Imagine they go on a run where they win a couple championships, and they're at the top of the league and how relatable that'd be, what's that going to do to the to the ecosystem you're talking about? Not just in Toronto, but across Canada. It's crazy to think about

Tariq Sbiet:

when they won the championship. Like we felt the impact of that immediately with all the clubs that popped up and reaching out and saying they want to play in leagues, and that's why we started the club League side and that's kind of blowing up. We felt it for sure. We felt the excitement. I mean, I was downtown Toronto, like three 4 million people in the streets and euphoria the energy that you felt like you felt everyone felt like a champion walking the streets like it was it was special. It was definitely a different type of feeling and gave like hope to people like wow, like they're like, they couldn't believe it happened. And so now that you know they got a championship they are if the stars have you know, some people don't believe it's possible. Again, tap it again. But if the stars align, you know, another championship it just it's a it's another like grenade that's thrown into this bar boom another explosion but regardless if they win or not like this is a basketball country. You know, it's it's it's also a hockey country and Most sports can and will coexist. But basketball is definitely a trending upward. And that's one of the things that I think is undeniable. If you're a brand, if you're a company, you know, someone that's trying to get involved, whether or just a person and industry professional, like, you see the growth, you want to get involved, everyone wants to be involved with growth. And that's the cool thing is the growth is undeniable. We're kind of fortunate at North Ballou to play a role and be at the forefront of it, in terms of just seeing, seeing what it looks like, you know, like seeing the Leonard Miller's of the world who's in high school right now, his high school senior, he's got, you know, Kansas, he's got, you know, Power Five conference, over 10 offers. He's a 611 610 611, like guard guard wink, you know, we haven't seen a prospect like that. And he kind of blew up in the last six months, because he had a growth spurt. And I'm sure you guys may have heard the name Elijah Fischer. You know, you know, he's another one, and there's many others, but the, the Miller kid is just like, we looked at ESPN rankings and states, there isn't somebody that fits his mold, you know, as a 610 611, then we already have a lottery pick, coming up and shade in sharp was the number one player in the world right now, who's Kentucky bound. So it's like, seeing that next generation come up, you know, it's not, it's not going to stop. It's just pipelines pull. And it's actually expanding because now the Calgary kids, the Alberta kids, you know, the British Columbia kids like once that once were truly like, those provinces are truly like, tapped into and there's infrastructure and there's elite development and all that. That's how I could say like, that's what's happening in Quebec right now. It happened in Ontario, it's happening in Quebec, Quebec to turn right now I think Alberta is next after that a couple years down the road. And then it's like, you know, sky's the limit you know that number because the reason why I could say three to five years gonna double is because of Quebec being activated now. And then that that number could even go further. Once Alberta is like, really like tapped into and then be seen because in Alberta, you have these this population. It's kind of diverse population and you got length, you got athleticism, and you got talent, pure talent, but now getting the skill getting to the mental game side of it. The development side, NBC, you always have a couple trees every year, you know, seven footers. Like they're just out there, you know? So what happens in the West coming?

JP Gaston:

I'm excited about Saskatchewan. That's always the Yeah, that's always the one for me that like even any sport as it comes out west it goes into BC and then kind of the last ones into the sport tend to be the farmhands out in Saskatchewan. And they're those guys are all giants. They have crazy athleticism, you give them any sport and all the sudden they just they get so good at it just got

Tariq Sbiet:

you on Manitoba, Nova Scotia, like people are live everywhere across the country and they love the game across the country always find some hidden gems. You know, Saskatchewan has got just Sean Henry, who's at Bradley right now. He's like a six, five wings now probably an NBA player, there's gonna be a pro overseas. You know, they've had Trey Lyles, who's kind of a Saskatchewan, Florida. We live a lot of his life in Indiana. But yeah, Manitoba has got a manual a cot, who's at Boise State right now who's got MBA upside, you know, and let's see how we could put put it together. So not definitely not to, not to remove those other regions from the equation, but I'm saying like in terms of, you know, pure talent and volume. That's where I look at like Ontario and Quebec. I look at Alberta. And I look at British Columbia, as well. Which makes sense, right? market size, population, all that stuff.

Seth Anderson:

My cousin if you've ever met kale JP, I don't think I've ever introduced you anywhere. My one of my first cousins, he's through marriage related to Trey, I think, and they've, they've met a couple times. That's it's a small world. So actually, on that note, though, what role? I think it's a great segue into the CBL and, you know, I'm a big fan of what they're doing. I had an opportunity to go up see a couple of games in Edmonton this year. My son, you know, he's got a bunch of jerseys on the wall. Jimmy buckets. He's got, you know, just a bunch up there Kobe. But right next, all of them he's got Edmonton stingers, Jersey, Xavier moon, this sort of lighting the province on fire this year. You know, when you look at, oh, West in particular, what role do you think the CBL will play and helping to think of it like from a kid's perspective, being excited to be like them? Be Like Mike or be like Xavier be like, whoever what role do you think the CBL plays In the growth of basketball at Western Canada,

Tariq Sbiet:

I would say in one word, inspiration and pathway, right, like, I've shared with you the triangle before Seth, how they're at the top of the pathway that isn't the NBA. You know, the Raptors are the top MBAs the top of the top when it comes to the pathway of basketball. But that strong pro domestic league has always been missing for Canada. You know, it, were we It's a truly Canadian product. I know, we've had the NBRC for years now, but doesn't have that close to coast presence. And when kids, as an example, as you mentioned, can look and see in their own backyard, they go to a stingers game. And it's a packed house, it's amazing, you know, environment, they could say, I could be that one day, but then it's, that's the players, right? That's the kids. Then there's the coaches, right? There's the referees, there's the industry professionals that finish executives, executives, you know, there's all parts of the equation. That's job opportunities, you know, and that's where I think there's a lot of alignment with, you know, the CBL, northpole hoops, playground, these are private entities in the space that are have are like minded in the sense of pushing the bar and creating jobs. And that's what the CBl has done a tremendous job of, and also, while creating those jobs, they're also they got people talking, they got people say, seeing, like, Whoa, I can do that, you know, I have these skills, I can do that. So it's so much more than basketball, it's a vehicle for change, it's a vehicle for people to to grow, to see that hey, like, and I've seen it because over the years of the, you know, working alongside the basketball community, high school coaches, prep coaches, college, university coaches, they're always like, what's my next level? You know, like, if you look at the Scott Morrison's in the royal ran as of the world, and, you know, and there's a long list of them that they have to go stateside, you know, to see, seek that next level opportunity, because it didn't exist in Canada. Because eventually you, Pete, you, you kind of peak and you reach the highest level of coaching in Canada. That's what's the next level after that. And right now, it's in the States. But now, the fact that we have pro ball, I think it's massive. You know, Roy's Roy's now recently named, he's part of the bcla coaching staff. That's fantastic to see. They also have the national team, but the outside of the national team, there isn't that next level opportunity. You know, and the last thing I'll say about CBl is just the culture, the culture of the game, the growth of the game, in terms of I was in Edmonton. This past summer, I was there for the CPL championships. I was amazed, not surprised, but amazed by just the overall production of the event. And then just the how Edmonton has embraced the Stingers. You know, like, I was a mini NBA game. That's what it felt like, you know,

Seth Anderson:

I was I was there too. And like, I drove up like, four hours to go to the game, because I was excited about it. Like it was it was fun, it was enjoyable. The other thing I would say on that is it was maybe the most affordable, professional sporting event family friendly, that I've ever been to, like my kids loved it. Very affordable. And it's awesome. Like, again, watching Xavier cross people up like it was like an NBA game out there like it was, it was special and the fans were into it. The music Cardinal office shall have time like, I don't know, I thought it was really well done. And I guess continuing in that vein a little bit when you look at the opportunity for for professional basketball. In Canada, obviously. We've got the raptors, we had the Grizzlies, it's probably not realistic to expect another NBA team at least anytime soon. What do you think the scope of opportunity is though? Maybe for potentially the WNBA or the G league to have more of a presence in Canada? I

Tariq Sbiet:

definitely think it's there. It's possible. I think there's a lot more activity than ever, in terms of business people, investors, pursuing, you know, NBA teams, WNBA teams, G League teams, and experimenting and in different markets in Canada. So it's only a matter of time. I think it's inevitable. Is it is it two years from now is it three years or five years from now? When the time is right, you know, I look at look at clawback and what's happening there. You know, right now they got the Montreal Alliance. Fantastic. I think it's gonna be cheap. for that community, I think it's a special community in Quebec. But you let you think about, okay. What does it look like three to five years from now, in terms of the amount of Quebec NBA players forget Canadian basketball, just Quebec NBA players a lot coming? And, you know, do you look at it and say, okay, Montreal Alliance, they've been naturally, they've now fit that, you know, fit that need that demand for pro basketball in the province? Or is it? Like, is it so overwhelming that it demands an NBA team? Again, wishful thinking, I'm, you know, I'm a glass half full kind of guy. But either way, you know, the Montreal alliance is going to be, you know, I've been to these high school games at the, in Quebec, you know, for the last 10 years or whatnot. And just to see, like, the intensity in there, like, it's like, they got cops there because the crowds are going crazy. And they're like, you know, there's rivalries there, the, the, the competition level is so high. That's a high schooler, I can just imagine, you know, Ottawa, Blackjacks, come into town to take on the Montreal, you know, Alliance, it's like, there's that same competitive level between the communities in a positive way, you know, like, I think that's gonna be cool to kind of see, and we're gonna see it this year. It's just the this is the tip off year 22. For them. It's exciting.

Seth Anderson:

I could just imagine the Raptors if there was a Montreal team that would be

JP Gaston:

has a man who deals with that time between the leafs and the Habs? Yeah, that would, that would be pretty amazing.

Tariq Sbiet:

I would say, five years would be the kind of

JP Gaston:

nerdy people.

Tariq Sbiet:

That would be the earliest I could see that. Because, again, you got to fast forward on seeing what's all the things that need to happen for that to be justifiable.

Seth Anderson:

Well, and if the MLB goes that way of having a team in Montreal again, I think that will happen. I'm I'm like 90% sure that they will get their team and would not be nice, package it up, bring in basketball and baseball at the same time. Exciting. I know. So one of the things we'd like to talk about on the show, too, is just around personal development and growth. You talked a lot about leadership. And you know, you've been developing that space over the last couple of years. I noticed on your Insta, you post a lot lately. Tim Grover, the book winning, what have you been learning? Through that book? I mean, Tim's unbelievable, obviously, as a mindset coach for the two guys in the picture behind you, what have you, what have you been taken from his

Tariq Sbiet:

book, so I read his, this first one relentless, a couple years back, and a lot of like, similar ideas and messages, that kind of just confirm what I do every day. And it's good reminders, um, you know, things like, yesterday, I was reading a chapter on words, uses, you know, selfishness, but it's really just spending time for yourself to in the growth process. And sometimes you have to be selfish with your time, and just allocate time in the right places. Sometimes it's being alone, you know, as opposed to going out with a friend or going up, you know, or even seeing family in some case, I'm saying, if the is all about these books are all about, you know, the highest level and in greatness, you know, and Colby and Jordan and all that. So it's like, you know, there is definitely an element of that, where you are going through the journey, and some people don't understand it, you know, like, peers don't understand that, you know, why am I seeing so and so less, because they're focused on a goal. And it's a, you know, goal setting and reaching goals are sometimes it's sometimes it's a lonely path, but if you can have people that are like minded on that path, it's not not that lonely, but you do need some time to like, reflect, you need some time to focus, you need some time to just need your, your, you know, your own time. And, you know, that was one of the things and, you know, just a lot of good lessons in the book. Sometimes I'll be reading it, and right before I'm going to the gym, just to get in the right mindset, you know, get my mindset flowing, and I'll be amped going to the gym for something that I read in there. So it's a it's, it's an interesting book, because I don't know if a lot of people connect with it in the same way In a sense of like, there's some intense topics, you know, and it's intense ideas. And, like most people are afraid of intensity. You know, like, they'll hesitate, especially in today's, you know, very, uh, you know, sensitive world. Everyone's like, it seems like sometimes we're walking on eggshells, because of sensitivity, but it's like, you know, that we're gonna go deep here for a second, like, in the world we live in today, right? Like, instead, it seems to me, right, going over the last couple years, it seems to me that the messaging out there in the world is like, instead of like, raising yourself to become strong, it's almost like they want like, the world wants people to bring themselves down to become weak, because the only way to get out of a tough time is to strengthen yourself. It's not to victimize yourself and point the finger at people and blame everyone around you. It's not to do that, it's to do this, it's to say, Hey, I gotta do better, I gotta improve. I messed up, you know, and that's where it's almost a breath of fresh air to kind of read some of this stuff. You know, because anybody that's done anything of worse in this world, you know, develop themselves, they develop themselves, they bruise themselves, they improve themselves. And it's not. And he says this in the book, for example, like it's winning is like, going to help, you know, and but what, actually, here's the, here's the, here's a, I'm looking at it right now, winning takes you to hell. And if you quit, that's where it'll stay. You know, that's a chapter. That's a name, that's one of the chapters here. And so it's just like, we live in a world right now, where it's like, and this is not now, all bison class forever, it's always been this way with just human beings, like, you're either going to stop, or you're going to keep going. Right? You're either going to improve yourself, or you're going to stay stagnant. Right? And the the thing that I've seen in this way, I've tried to kind of create my own environment, my own bubble, it's like misery loves, loves company, you know, but the opposite is true, too. You know, success loves company, too. And that's where it's like, mindset, the habit, developing the right mindset, empowering people. And that's where with no, in my team, like, you know, going through gold, and just like, for everyone else, it's not easy, you know, but like, what's the answer to that? Do we stock do we quit? Or do we keep going? Do we find ways do we pivot? Or do we adjust? And you know, that's where I first had to do it on my own and show them and then they seen progress. They seen different things happen. And then now they believe, and now they push, and we all push together. So I go on all day long. This guy's but

Seth Anderson:

before I dig into one of the things I was thinking about while you were talking there, I mean, I could vibe on on that all day. And there was, but before that, have you read can't hurt me by David Goggins?

Tariq Sbiet:

No, but I know, I know, Goggins like, I watched some of his stuff on YouTube, he's, he's even more intense than Elon Grover

Seth Anderson:

is a whole other level man. But he's got in his book, and you should pick it up. It's a great read. But he's got this concept called the accountability mirror. And basically, like, if you can't look yourself in the mirror, and be honest with yourself, whatever it is, good, bad, or otherwise, you have no place to start. Right? So if you're not good at something, or you need to develop something, and you're telling yourself, I'm great at this thing, and you're basically lying to yourself, you don't have a place to start. But if you're like, you know what, I'm not a good enough leader, I need to be a better leader. And you look yourself in the mirror and you, you connect with yourself, and you look at yourself, and you're like, Okay, I need to get better at this, then you've got somewhere to start. And it's liberating. It is right, like we we put on these masks, and we pretend that we're something and I mean, I've been there and it's just like, I'm this or I'm not this, or I want to be this and I got to put in the work to do it. But it all starts with, you know, that accountability and that awareness. So anyway, I think you'd think you'd vibe on that book for

Tariq Sbiet:

sure. I'll check it out. As soon as I'm done this one. I'll check that one out. And I think it's like different people different like authors and those type of personalities. They'll connect differently with the readers like some people aren't ready to read these books. Like they're just not there mentally there to read those books because of how extreme not extreme but like how these are like, this is the highest level of Cheevers of the world we're talking about. Right? So some people are not ready for those. What they might Do you as extreme ideas? You know? So that's where I look at it as I'm reading. I'm like, I wonder if everyone could relate to this? You know, I don't think so. But it's like, that's why there's different types of books and different types of personalities that might be the, the Tony Robbins of the world, which is like, it's a different vibe, right? But it's good to like, it's intro level, like a bring people in, get their confidence to positivity and all that stuff. Whereas this guy is gonna be like, going to hell. And you know what I mean? Like, it's different type of words and

JP Gaston:

points. But I think it's a lot like physical wellness, right? Like, you're not gonna go and lift 450 pounds right away. Most people can't do that. Like, you've got to you got to work your way into it. You got to stretch your brain a little bit at a time and get there eventually.

Tariq Sbiet:

Absolutely. It's good point, the process for sure.

Seth Anderson:

And I mean, as we've kind of JP and I have got into our I'll call it like mindset coaching and helping people. I do think there's this perception, you know, that people want to go from like zero to 100 real quick. And, like, it takes years of practice, and discipline. And I've learned in my journey, you know, yeah, I lost 100 pounds. Yeah, I quit drinking. Yeah, I basically rewired my brain and completely, you know, I've made a lifestyle that I love living like I love my life. But it did not happen overnight. It was just like Lego blocks, man, lay the foundation and just like one at a time just every day get a

Tariq Sbiet:

little better. Before you get rewire it, you had to go through some tough times

Seth Anderson:

100%. And I've talked about this, I think on almost every episode of the pod this year, so forgive me. But we got introduced to podcast, we had a guest on earlier this season, Haley Daniels, and she went to the Olympics. And she she mentioned finding mastery, which is the the sports psych from the Seattle Seahawks, Dr. Michael Gervais. And I listened to a few episodes and one of the episodes he talked about earning your values. So in order for us to value something, we have to go through something to earn it. And I just love that concept. And so to me, you know, one of the things that I think I've earned is my personal health, because I know what it's like to not have it to not take care of myself to get to that place where, you know, I'm looking in the mirror at a 320 pound person who hasn't been to a gym and his entire life and doesn't know who he is or what he wants. And it's like, I need to do better. And like, I've earned my personal health and so therefore I value it. Definitely. So I don't know, I think that's kind of a neat concept to play around with when you're like, Okay, what are my values? But why do I value that and odds are, it's because you went through something to, to appreciate it or to devalue it.

Tariq Sbiet:

You know, I went through a bad depression, but six years ago, and it was the best thing that ever happened to me, right, like, I hit rock bottom. And then I realized that I want to stay as far away from that place as possible. And so it elevated me to another level, because since then the, you know, the trajectory has been going that way. And that was like six years ago, there's like a lot a lot of digging, you know, you dig in to yourself, you know, you find out through the darkness, you know, I mean? Like, what's what, and what are the adjustments that you need to make? And then that growth mindset is like, what, really, I hope to share with everyone that I meet, you know, and it takes time to really understand it. And as you bump into, come up with people every day. And I know that like, okay, we're talking this group, this person, we're talking a different language, it's okay. You know, I mean, like, whether you see like people that do have the growth mindset, and then you just slide and you align and you connect, even with you, right, like, that's how we kind of connected. We're on the same kind of frequency there. But it's, it's a life ain't easy, man. Life ain't easy. And it's like, again, going back to the, what's the solution? Is it quit? Is it stop? Is it point the fingers of blame other people? Is it like, you know, you come to my level, not like, I'm gonna go up and you're gonna meet me there, you know, I'm not gonna go down, you know, and that's something that's like, I think we see in the world now. It's just, it's just such a toxic world these days, you know, overall, but now it's like, What world are you? Are we going to create for ourselves? You know, who are we talking to? Who are who is around us in our bubble? What is our our environment looks like?

Seth Anderson:

A couple of things come to mind. I mean, one like on the depression or, you know, sort of in that value space, there's this quote I love which is, you can't leave somewhere you've never been and I don't like I think generally Most people don't want to end up in that place. And a lot of people don't even know that they're there. I think that's the hard part. It's once you're aware that I'm in this place, then you can leave, then you can grow that. And then that's where that whole accountability comes into. And I think the other point you were making just around, you know, What world do I want to be a part of what lifestyle do I want to have, and I have one quote, like one quote by my desk that I look at every day, which is you create your space. And that's it. Right? You can get that right down to the mindset level, how we show up our actions, whatever, but like, we actually get to choose the energy, the presence that we bring to the table each and every day. I actually think more people are afraid of having that much power, and like they kind of shy away from it. But I've just like in the last few years, I just fully embrace it, like I have control on how I show up and how I react or respond to things. And I don't know, once you can kind of tap into that, like inner wisdom, you can do some things that you would have never expected.

Tariq Sbiet:

Yeah, no awareness, like you said, it's sometimes you got to go through it personally. Other times, you might be fortunate enough to like, bump into somebody that can provide some guidance to, that's where the mentorship comes into play, in share experience, because that's the only way you really build awareness. It's either like, you know, you're very self reflective. Just innately, or, you know, someone is they're saying to Hey, wake up, like, you're not what you think you are, or where you think you are, to go to the drawing board. Really write things out. And, and until, until eventually, like you're talking to yourself enough. And those talks are not like, Oh, I'm worried about this, or I'm afraid of that happening. Or, you know, because we talk to ourselves, like so much in a day. Right? Oh, what are the thoughts that are in our brain? Like, is it growth, improvement? Finding, you know, like, love passion? You know, first is what seemingly society is feeding us right now is fear and death and negativity. And, you know, Blaine are good enough for?

Seth Anderson:

Yeah, oh,

Tariq Sbiet:

it's wild stuff. Blood. But yeah, it's a, it's an interesting conversation, for

JP Gaston:

sure. Love the idea of you, like, you can come up and meet me up here. Like, I'm going to be on the top floor. I don't care if you take the elevator or the stairs, you can choose, but you're gonna meet me up here because I'm not coming down.

Tariq Sbiet:

Absolutely, absolutely. And, on top of that, like, there's, like, I'm, let's say, I'm on the 20th floor, like, I need to go to the 14th floor. I, you know, like, I haven't done, I haven't done nothing. That's the mindset, like, I haven't done nothing, you know, I got a lot, I got a lot to prove I got a lot to a lot of goals to achieve, you know, not only am I not going down, I'm going off, I'm striving up. And whoever, like, you'll, you'll follow that league, like, I'm not gonna follow the other way. And that's true, like, man, like, whether it's the friend, the friendship relationship, whether it's, I've seen it, I'm not married, but I've seen it in the, the husband wife dynamic, right, where it just takes it to another level, you know, you have if you have, especially if you have a kid as well, like there's, you're now managing the anxieties of a household. Right? And that's like, are you gonna, whoever the leader, like, we find out who the leader of the household is, like, the household is not going to elevate unless there's a leader that elevates it. And that, that that needs to be the mindset of that person, male or female, whoever it might be, but it needs to be. Let's go up, you know, let's not go down. Let's not be afraid. Let's you know, and it's just like a bat. It's a constant battle, because we have enough anxieties as individuals as just one person. But then now you're having to manage again, back to leadership, whether it's, you're managing a household, or you're running a company, you know, or your captain of the basketball team. Life in basketball, it's all the same and business that's how I view it. So it's just you know, I funny thing, so leadership, right? To your point, JP, I was faced with like, a conversation with a fellow like leader, and that person was kinda sick. We're talking about okay, do you lead with compassion? Healing is MTC dealing with stress, like, every situation is different. There are there are times like COVID times, you got to leave strikes, you know, because I can't, you know, I can't like have the The person that is in a tough mental spot, which was the most of the world at one point, like, if they're met with empathy, empathy, they don't really have something to follow. Whereas if they see strengths, they follow that. And then to get to a certain level, and then we could talk about, you know, empathy, but we need to get out of, we need to go from survival mode to thriving, like, we need to get you to thrive. So my answer was, No, I'm leading with strength at this very moment. The world needs strength, you know, the world needs strong leaders. And that's leading by example. Right? By action. So it's like, it's not a time to like, discuss, like, if you're at a low point, right, and you're at a low mental state, low vibration, and you're trying to get out of it. Like, I don't think empathy is what's gonna do it, because I've been there and that low vibration, and it didn't do it. For me, at least it can be different for somebody else. But it's like, we can't sit there talking about why, for a very long time with empathy, talk about the why you're feeling this way. And you know, what's going on? And all those things at that moment, in a moment of like, what's the word in a moment of chaos? Like, especially like, if you're in a leadership position, like you got to be strong. Because if you're not strong, it they feel it, you know, I mean, the people that you leave, they will feel it immediate, like, there has to be No, you can't switch, you got to go, you got to find the solution. But find the solution. Let's bring the let's bring the environment to like a stable place. And then we can discuss your feelings and everything else that comes with it. But we need to, we need to get out of survival mode, then we got to go to thrive.

JP Gaston:

No, I think I think that's it. Like when I think of it, when I think of the metaphor of the building, even when you get to the top level, there's levels above you that you might not even be aware of. Yeah, well, and as a leader, like, to me, at least the way you get there, is by helping lift others up. Yes.

Tariq Sbiet:

And sometimes don't get me wrong, I will make sure on record, empathy, and empathy is 100% a part of it as well, you need that you need both, you need a healthy combination and a balance of all, I was simply speaking on the when it's time of chaos, like right now, you know, right now in the world, do we need strong leaders or like that are going to be able to get the job done lead by example, lead for the people? Or do we is it a matter of empathy at the highest level? You know, because it's a solutions are found through logic, not emotions, especially the, the, the society feeds off of emotions, emotions are also part of fear, and a part of, you know, all that all that stuff. It's, it's, it's taps into, like, a deep place of, of suffering, you know, and that's where the fear kind of comes from. But if we just look like look at a situation logically and say, okay, okay, we got a ABC, we got to address these things. And then we got to find the solutions for ABC. And then let's go execute, now we have a button you can execute, that's what's going to give us a chance to get out of it out of any type of problem. So yeah, I think definitely, there's definitely a place for empathy. There's a place for sensitivity, and there's a, you know, we're human beings at the end of the day, so we have to have a healthy balance of them all. So don't go too far off topic, JP. Back into the building thing. Yes. There's all there's always another loved one.

Seth Anderson:

I think he made a lot of great points there. I think where I would go is I think you need both of those things and unbalanced. It's where do those things apply? Yes. And this is how I look at it. Right? If you can replace judgment and blame and finger pointing with empathy and compassion. I think that's a better place to start solving any problem. Okay, we're here now doesn't, you know, we might want to spend a little time in figuring out the components that occurred. So it doesn't happen again. But there's zero value, in my opinion of going back and saying it's this person's fault, or this person did that. We're here. What's the path forward? Yeah. And I think that is a much more effective place to start as a leader because I find we can waste a lot of time, get a lot of people's backs up, you know, create an atmosphere of distrust by blaming and trying to figure out what happened instead of just like, Okay, here we are, how are we going to get over that? Yeah, let's do that. So that's right. Instead of spinning on, like, how something made you feel or you know, there, you can get stuck there for sure. So it's like how do you how do you bring those two things together and the most effective way to keep moving forward in business and life support and whatever, and society as a whole Totally, totally. I think this has been amazing. Tarik, really appreciate you taking the time. You know, from a North Pole hoops perspective, if people are interested in learning more, what's the best place for them to get ahold of you or, you know, tap into what you guys are up to?

Tariq Sbiet:

So our website is North Pole COMM And then on social media at North Pole roots, you know, I think if you're a basketball fan at basketball, you know, that's, that's your get your fix, you know, from middle school to the NBA.

Seth Anderson:

Awesome. Well, again, and you know, we've got some exciting things are brewing up for the new year. More to come on that but really excited to kind of see where, where we can potentially work together and create some cool content.

Tariq Sbiet:

Definitely appreciate you guys having me. It was really nice conversation start off the day here. And obviously, we covered a lot of ground, for sure.

Seth Anderson:

Awesome. Well, have a great rescue day. And thanks again for popping in.

JP Gaston:

Thanks, guys. Hey, thanks for listening to season three. This is this is the end, we're at the end, you've made it.

Seth Anderson:

Everything that you know, and I think we're going on a high note, we really appreciate everyone who's taken the time to even listen to five minutes of an episode this year. And, you know, we're really looking forward to continuing on with Season Four in the new year. But in the meantime, like we mentioned off the top, we've got our whole catalogue 50 Plus episodes now JP,

JP Gaston:

yeah, it's just you click on that first one and hit Play and Apple podcasts. It'll just go through all of them. So just keep listening. You can have a marathon. There you go over to marathon.

Seth Anderson:

As well, you know, as we've been mentioning all season, we're open to coaching both individuals and organizations. I don't know if you want to tell people a little bit more about that.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, we do. We do training and development for organizations. We've got a few in the hopper right now that we've been working with, and also working on podcasts for other organizations. So hey, if that interests you, for sure, reach out. We're happy to help you on your podcast journey. We've certainly had a very interesting one. Couple of

Seth Anderson:

a couple things. Yeah. We're not. What are we nominated for? This year?

JP Gaston:

We're nominated. We had a Stevie Award nomination and a cool,

Seth Anderson:

yeah, I've actually heard of that award.

JP Gaston:

Yeah, we're we're nominated for a digital award again, as well. So

Seth Anderson:

we're going for platinum this time. Yeah, hopefully

JP Gaston:

hopefully back tobacco, Ava digital awards. And yeah, there's there's a few things going on that

Seth Anderson:

so hit us up the biz dojo.com Or at The Biz Dojo podcast, we're on Insta workface are what do we just call that? We just call that meta now any meta meta around the meta? LinkedIn? Also Twitter, we post on there

JP Gaston:

with occasionally it's you see us on there and on on occasion and don't forget you can reach out to us at coaching at the biz dojo.com as well

Seth Anderson:

or anything at the biz. dojo.com

JP Gaston:

just try something you know, take your own name, that's fine. Just do your own name at the biz dojo.com We'll get it.

Seth Anderson:

Triceratops at the biz. dojo.com Anything you want. We'll get it fit your

JP Gaston:

brand that The Biz, Dojo, whatever, eggnog,

Seth Anderson:

whatever. All of it. Alright, thanks for listening.